Flat pedal shoes

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  • Flat pedal shoes
  • JonEdwards
    Member

    So I’ve had 2 pairs of 5-10s. An original pair of Impacts (the suede ones) – great grip, soaked really easily, took ages to dry, carboard midsole and the daft tongue design rubbed the top of my foot raw. I then got a set of Freeriders – equally grippy, looked a lot nicer, really comfortable, harder to soak, but equally poor to dry out, same midsole and the sole has fallen off one of them after relatively little use (2.5 years old, but I wear SPDs most of the time).

    So before I throw more money at 5-10 – Do any of the other options (Shimano AM41, Vans Gravel or Teva Links) have anything like the equivalent amount of grip? As a mostly spud/occasional flat user who loves his rocky DHs, I’m after all the grip I can get. All weather friendly is good too. Are the 5:10 Barons any better than the freeriders for longevity?

    Ideally they want to be available from CRC so I can make use of their “spend £100/save £50” offer (I have a bunch of other stuff to buy). This kind of knocks out the Tevas as CRC doesn’t do them (yet)

    Cheers!

    Jon

    GW
    Member

    just an idea but why not get normal skate shoes and use the winter to learn how to ride flats properly? I guarantee it’ll make you a better rider.

    JonEdwards
    Member

    I’m actually not bad at all on flats – taken me a long while to get there though, and I still believe that SPD/flat choice is horses for courses and most of my riding is improved by using SPDs (lots of long technical climbs)

    However if you want to recommend me some “normal skate shoes” that grip like 5-10s and are relatively weatherproof, then go ahead!

    🙂

    wors
    Member

    Etnies.

    Edit – not sure about the weatherproofing though. Try some goretex approach shoes, they are plenty grippy enough on the peadals.

    Vinte
    Member

    GW, ditch all of your modern bikes, buy a penny farthing and learn to ride properly.

    Iff youve got decent pedals then skate shoes are ideal. 5 tens areto big and bulky

    yeah i have this same dilema – i’ve got some trainers that have the soft rubber soles and are really really grippy and only cost £20 from TK Maxx but don’t last very long because the pedals destroy the soft rubber but then i can buy 4 pairs for 5-10’s so don’t if the collective length of time is going to be cheaper to get the trainers or a pait of MTB shoes

    GW
    Member

    recommend me some “normal skate shoes” that grip like 5-10s

    missing my entire point? 🙄

    peachos
    Member

    try duffs 4130. pretty good sole on them – plenty grippy enough for using with flats (its a bmx shoe). and cheap. same like all shoes though, they get wet – so you may be disappointed.

    edit. ~£30 from CRC

    JonEdwards
    Member

    missing my entire point?

    Nope as it happens. I’ve tried various skate shoes and I don’t find any of them to be near as good for riding as 5-10s are – too soft, too bulky round the ankle (Impacts too), too sponge like, not enough protection, and yes, not enough grip. I like lots of grip. That’s a personal choice – you are pefectly entitled to differ.

    wrecker
    Member

    AM41s are great. Probably not as grippy as 5-10s but are comfy and seem a bit more solid and waterproof than the old AM40s. Cheaper too.

    scruff
    Member

    Having skateboarded for 15 years and biked for 30 years I can say skate shoes are not ideal for biking. Soles too thin and flexy, totally different protection of shoe and foot, no grip whist off bike pushing up trails.

    Pedal grip from a sole is subjective and linked to technique and pedal design.

    Shimanos are great all weathers but uppers dont last. Those Tevas look great.

    Premier Icon guitarhero
    Subscriber

    I obviously can’t ride flats properly either as I use 5.10s and love them, but agree about their sponge like quality.
    I bought the Teva links for commuting and they are very grippy, and the waterproofing seems to work very well. My feet have remained dry so far.

    WackoAK
    Member

    I have the old style Shimano AM shoes but they are now starting to fall apart (4+ years and spend all winter never being dry) and I’m either getting the new version or the Teva Links. I notice that Singletrack Towers have taken delivery of a pair of tevas so hopefully they will be commenting on them.

    I ruled out the 5:10’s purely because they act like a sponge.

    GW
    Member

    with decent technique you wouldn’t need super grippy soled shoes and using shoes with a thinner sole allows better pedal feel/feedback. (too thin will hurt tho) but as you say you are pefectly entitled to differ 😉

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I was much happier with my AM40s than with my 5 10s- bought another set of Shimanos, not likely to buy 5 10s again in a hurry. Better made, better designed, lasted over twice as long, thinner sole, adjustable stiffness, half-decent wet weather manners… Not as much grip but still more than I need. Just basically a better shoe in every way I care about.

    The thing about “needing” lots of grip, is that yes it is showing up failings in technique. And that’s OK, I’ve no problem with people using hardware to fix a software problem, that’s why I’ve got a 160mm bike… But if you fix this you won’t just need less grip, you’ll also be better connected to your bike at all times. Move with the bike, not against it, and everything becomes that little bit easier and smoother and, dare I say it, better. And that transfers back to SPDs as well. It’s worth doing even if you still keep wearing glue-shoes.

    sobriety
    Member

    Etnies Cinch in leather, not too soaky and grippy on flats. S’what I use.

    mansonsoul
    Member

    Big LOL to all the heroes who say its all about technique. More grip is more grip. You could be, I don’t know, Sam Hill say, and have awesome technique but still go better in sticky rubber shoes. More grip is more grip, it’s always good boyos. Just because you’re riding gods doesnt mean you ride slicks, does it? No, you ride the grippiest mofo tyres you can because more grip is more grip.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    mansonsoul – Member

    You could be, I don’t know, Sam Hill say, and have awesome technique but still go better in sticky rubber shoes. More grip is more grip, it’s always good boyos. Just because you’re riding gods doesnt mean you ride slicks, does it? No, you ride the grippiest mofo tyres you can because more grip is more grip.

    Is this a joke? Honestly can’t tell.

    5:10 basics FTW

    I wear spats, that way I can dance my way around the trails if I get bored of mountain biking.

    GW
    Member

    Just because you’re riding gods doesnt mean you ride slicks, does it? No, you ride the grippiest mofo tyres you can

    ha ha!! 😆
    As it happens, No, I don’t ride anywhere near the “gripiest mofo tyres” as other than for DH race tracks they’d be **** horrible for most riding. I normally ride the most predictable drifting tyres which (for the rear anyway) actually does happen to be very close to a semi slick.

    because more grip is more grip.

    more grip is generally a lot slower rolling (again, unless we’re talking pure DH)

    deviant
    Member

    Any old trainers i dont mind getting muddy and wet will suffice in the winter….in the summer i have some Airwalk skate shoes that are grippy and have a stiffer sole than typical trainers so are ideal…in my opinion of course.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    I’m in the same situation, need another pair of flat shoes for when my 5-10 freeriders are wet.

    Recently got my AM41s refunded under warranty because the upper disintegrated. Merlin were v good and admitted they’d had a few with same problem.

    Sole had also been torn apart in no time by the long-ish pins on my SSC Nano pedals.

    I’ll probably try Teva Links or maybe wait until next Spring when the Sombrio flat shoes are available (they should be on CRC as Hotlines import them).

    Rickos
    Member

    Just get your favourite pair of comfy wellies and get them resoled with Stealth rubber soles.

    http://www.feetfirst.resoles.co.uk/cycling_mtb_shoe_repair.php

    Or how about a pair of Vans –
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=57806

    DeeW
    Member

    I’ve had a couple of pairs of 5:10s: original suede Impacts and Karvers. Fell out of love with them (too heavy and bulky, and shit in soak up water like a sponge).

    Got a pair of old Nike Air Whistlers, Nike sticky sole not sticky enough for me, so resoled with Stealth rubber at FeetFirst. Very good, but not in the slightest bit water resistant. Resole lasted really well too.

    Recently got a pair of AM41s which I’m liking a lot: good waterproofness, light and stiff, and not noticed much difference in grip from 5:10 soles.

    I do think technique has a lot to do with grip, and that as my technique has got better I no longer need the ultimate grip of 5:10 rubber. You see a fair few world cup guys riding with all sorts of Nikes / Vans etc. Now either they’ve all been resoled with Stealth rubber, or they can manage just fine without the absolute grippiest soles.

    It always amazes me on here that a guy can ask advice on anything (in this case shoes) and he instantly gets told he should learn to ride differently by some Forum Whore riding god. 🙄

    But on topic, I have a pair of Nike 6.0’s they dry out quick and offer plenty of grip. I use them with seal skin or Craft warm socks. I’m seriously considering a pair of the Vans Gravels though. A guy at our local bmx track had some on and he really rated them.

    curvature
    Member

    What a load of rubbish!

    SPD’s are the only way to be at one with your bike unless you want to do crazy tricks and stick your legs out etc

    But honestly for most of the riding done in the uk either on singletrack or trail centres then SPD’s really are the way forward.

    This is all my opinion of course having been using them since Shimano launched their first set of SPD’s. Before that I had clips and straps for off road use, now that is hardcore! You try getting your feet out quick with straps!

    Off to have a glass of red now! 😀

    curvature
    Member

    Well put Shep!

    xcentric
    Member

    not a expert, but happy enough in my New Balance trail running shoes – GoreTex, so dry unless really torrential or deep streams, enough grip on pedals – but prob not as much as 5.10’s – and fine if you need to walk the big up the steep bits. £30 on sale.

    Euro
    Member

    I recommend the 4130 range from Duffs. Thicker, studier sole than normal skate shoes (they’re bike shoes) and plenty of grip with a decent set of pedals. I have the Vinny Salmon version (contains a bit of suede) and although not waterproof, dry out quickly. TK Maxx do them cheap but CRC have the winter boots (no suede) for £30 (size 10-11). Get two pairs for when one is drying for less that a pair of 5-10s (over priced and overkill imo)

    Check out the sole brother…

    Van Halen
    Member

    have you tried pushing up a muddy hillside in those duffs. i have and it really wasnt fun. absolutely no grip.

    also the soles are super thin.

    My Teva Links are great. Not waterproof but dry very quickly. No shoes are really properly waterproof other than ones with the neoprene cuff as water very quickly gets in the top. I just wear Sealskinz under mine and they’re great.

    Premier Icon Radioman
    Subscriber

    Im very surprised so few people use Shimano AM 41s.

    I have 2 pairs of 5 10s and think AM41s are a bit better, they are a lot CHEAPER TOO.

    Yes they don’t look that good(they look more like cycle shoes), maybe thats why we don’t see lots of them.

    The BIG selling point is the water/mud resistant lace cover. Its Stops mud, water and puddles filling your shoes in winter. Yes 5 10s are super grippy and good in summer but AM41s rule for muddy wet times.

    In terms of grip the 5 10s probably are slightly “stickier on pedals” but I prefer to be able to move my feet on flats to tack advantage of the freedom of movement flats offer.

    Euro
    Member

    Van Halen – Member
    have you tried pushing up a muddy hillside in those duffs. i have and it really wasnt fun. absolutely no grip.

    True, they’re not great for mucky hill walking. Probably best with a set of hiking boots if that’s your bag. Great on the bike with a set of flat pedals though.

    How do the Teva Links size up? I’m normally a 43, occasionally a 42 but my AM40s are a 44. I really like my AM40s but the sole is pretty badly worn (still feels fine but I imagine holes will appear at some point) and I ripped the upper open on a log so it’s been stitched back together.

    yunki
    Member

    I’ve always used vans skate shoes so I thought that I would give their gravel cycle specific shoe a try..

    overall I’m really impressed.. very light.. very splashproof (including some severe dunking this evening) stiff but not too stiff and very grippy..

    like a classic vans shoe the fit is on the narrow side.. and the material used in the construction of the upper doesn’t seem to have as much give as leather or suede either although they are starting to mould to my foot slowly..

    they are more than a bit pricey for my tastes too but I think I’m almost glad that I indulged myself..

    I’ve tried some cheap skate shoes with flats but found them disconcertingly bendy and harsh on the foot.

    So I got some 5.10 Impact lows for flats but it took a while to get used to how firmly they held the foot compared with the float I was getting with SPDs. [This might actually be the reason why my left knee gets a bit dicky]. They also felt and looked rather clumpy. They do the job.

    I’ll probably get the AM41s next time if the fit is good, but that will be some time away as the 5.10s are wearing fairly slowly.

    devs
    Member

    I love 5:10s! They are brilliant but I can see why the haterz hate. 4 years almost daily use before the originals died and the 2nd pair are going strong. I’ve never paid more than £58 for them either. BUT, given that I’m doing the puffer on flats I bought some Tevas as comfort spares. I haven’t tried them in the wet yet as we haven’t had any rain since god knows when. They aren’t as comfy, aren’t as warm, aren’t as grippy but they look nice and feel ok. If it came to hike a bike I would prefer the 5:10s, in fact I prefer them for everything but the Tevas will do for big rides with river crossings!

    jedi
    Member

    my current faves are nike 6.0 melees. canvas and great sole. not stoopid grippy like 5-10s and they dry in an hour on the radiator 🙂

    Slightly off topic, but I wonder if Adidas will put more effort into the performance of 5 10’s above the sticky stealth …

    How stiff is the sole on the Nike 6.0s? The AM40s are pretty stiff and there’s a midsole insert to make them more rigid which I really like.

    prezet
    Member

    I’ve ridden Vans and Nike 6.0’s – and recently bought some 5.10’s.

    The 5.10’s are too grippy for me – don’t like them. Would probably consider wearing them if I was riding hardtail in the alps and my feet were likely to jump around on the pedals.

    Regular Vans I find too soft in the soles. But I struggle to find Nike 6.0’s with a decent grip pattern. Been thinking about the Vans Gravel, as I think the sole has been stiffened up a bit.

    GW
    Member

    TBF prezet – there’s no such thing as “regular Vans” Vans use many different sole structures, thickness’ and grip paterns. Old skools are too thin for rough riding, some are too stiff/thick while others are perfect.

    Bagstard
    Member

    I used vans with waffle soles before 5.10’s came out, but the sole would wear very quickly.

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