Do you correct people when they say Zucchini?

Home Forum Chat Forum Do you correct people when they say Zucchini?

Viewing 25 posts - 81 through 105 (of 105 total)
  • Do you correct people when they say Zucchini?
  • don simon
    Member

    πŸ˜†
    You really don’t understand how the English language works, do you?

    iDave
    Member

    There is no reason why we have to use the same term as the americans.

    Why not? No one says we have to, no one says we can’t. Should they use the same word as us? If so why? If not, why not?

    Fire road.

    ‘Double-track’ – WTF!

    Is singletrack a US term? I think we should be told? Or berm maybe?

    Fire road.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Don – a fire road is a specific thing that we don’t have.

    don simon
    Member

    Tandem. It’s a compound noun which is used for a specific thing which I’m sure will have a synonym in English and therefore can be used to amplify the English language and make it one of the richest languages in the world.
    You do NOT have the right to say how the English language developes, no one does, everyone does!
    This closed mindedness is most unlike you.

    iDave
    Member

    Don – a fire road is a specific thing that we don’t have.

    We do have them, I was running on one this morning

    …and back on topic.

    The answer to any question/statement with ‘zucchini’in it is, “Surely you mean bacon?”

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    TJ, I like an occasional gamble so I bet myself a quid I could find you being a hypocrite by simply looking at a small number of your recent posts.

    So from here:

    Molgrips =- it irritates in the same way as seeing words with American spellings

    And from here:

    they have attempted to go thru the right channels

    Woo! I’ve got a quid!

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    PS, looking at the search results, your command of the apostrophe is dismal πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Eggplant, Zucchini, Cilantro and Arugula. Ridiculous **** names.

    I consider myself to be well-versed in stateside language, and I had to look up ‘arugula’. Never come across that before.

    Knob – bulbous protrusion. Nob – member of the nobility

    If you’re talking about the correct spelling of the insult / vernacular, it’s actually “enob,” with the ‘e’ being silent. The etymology is “bone.”

    I correct people when they say Betws y Coed wrongly. Which is just about everyone from England.

    I’d like to think that I’d be in the minority there, but perhaps I’m wrong. Bets-ee-coyd?

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    I was like saying to Fred it was him and he turned round to me and said it was me adn I was like ” it wasnae me cos I was not here” and he was like ” it was so you ” and I turned round to him and was like ” it never was so he turned round to me and was like ” it so was you” So I was like “Lolz in never was”
    etcetc

    All said with the aussie rising inflection of course.

    It really does not matter how language develops does it.

    don simon
    Member

    but perhaps I’m wrong. Bets-ee-coyd?

    Yep, you’re wrong. πŸ˜†
    High fives for Bez, now spend your new found wealth on getting a life. πŸ˜‰

    don simon
    Member

    It really does not matter how language develops, does it?

    Vocabulary no, GRAMMER YES!
    πŸ™„ Not worth it.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    I was just like trying to demonstrate something?

    don simon
    Member

    And you’ve demonstrated it, yet again.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Don / Bez – thats inability to spell / dyslexia. I get “through” wrong so often I gave up and write thru. Spellchecker couldn’t cope with all the variants I find. If I end up with though or thorough it changes the meaning somewhat. I didn’t even know thru was an americanism

    apostrophes – never been able to get the hang of ’em. My English teacher told me not to bother if was going to get it wrong so often.

    I was actually in remedial classes for writing for years at school. Nowadays I would be classed as dyslexic I think

    Elfinsafety
    Member

    I was like saying to Fred

    πŸ˜•

    Hmm?

    Sorry, mind like a vegetable draining thing actually mine’s crap really it don’t drain well the holes are in the wrong places I’ll have to get a new one.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    apostrophes – never been able to get the hang of ’em. My English teacher told me not to bother if was going to get it wrong so often.

    Speaking as an apostrophe nazi – when in doubt, leave it out.

    damo2576
    Member

    yes i hate it when people ask for “zucchini flowers” always have to correct them with “fiora de zucchina”

    don simon
    Member

    I didn’t even know thru was an americanism

    Tandem, you appear to not be very consistent (again) in your defence of the English langauage. I sympathize with your dyslexia, but I’m not convinced that it affects your grammar. If you want information, you ask a question., when you ask a question you use a question mark.
    You want to defend the correct use of the English language by rejecting new vocabulary, for which there are no rules.
    And yet you have no issues pissing all over the grammar, for which there are some rules.
    Poor use of apostrophes is poor learning and laziness and from what has been said above poor teaching.
    If you have so little respect for your language that you can’t be bothered learning the grammar, you have no right to comment on the use of the vocabulary.
    Que tengas un buen dia.

    don simon
    Member

    100, just to upset elfin. πŸ˜†

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Don – you rather missed the point.

    I made two posts attempting to demonstrate usage of language that modern youth use and many folk rail against. Its that old bugbear of nuance going missing in text.

    Never mind.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Don – a fire road is a specific thing that we don’t have.

    If you’ve ever been on a ‘fire road’ in the US you will notice that they are identical to our forestry access roads. So we do have the roads, they are just used partly for a different purpose. After all I am sure they also use them for timber extraction, and if there were a fire in a UK forest I’m also sure the fire brigade would be driving along them.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    Well, if we are going to be pedantic about fire road, there was never such a thing as singletrack when I was young. It was a path.

    I happily use singletrack and fire road now.

    Pathworld doesn’t have the same ring to it, does it?

    πŸ™‚

    don simon
    Member

    Well, if we are going to be pedantic about fire road, there was never such a thing as singletrack when I was young. It was a path.

    You’re missing the point entirely, it’s all about TJ, he has an opinion about something and rather than saying that it’s just an opinion and leaving it at that, he has to say that it is WRONG in spite of contradictory evidence. He will quite happily use vocabulary hat has been taken from other languages without thinking about it while trying to tell us that introducing new vocabulary is WRONG! This is all perfectly normal in the world of Tan.

    aP
    Member

    When I was studying part of masters in the US I had to take an English elective and one of things that surprised me from taking this class was that a language changes fastest the closer to it’s originating place. Also most of the americanisms that tj hates are actually old English, so we exported them 300 years ago, our usage changed and now the yanks are reimporting them to us.
    Oh, I was given a special dispensation to submit proper English as she is wrote.

Viewing 25 posts - 81 through 105 (of 105 total)

The topic ‘Do you correct people when they say Zucchini?’ is closed to new replies.