Camel pack or bottle

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  • Camel pack or bottle
  • What the hell u on about Boggles………..

    simondbarnes
    Member

    You used a camelbak for an XC race? And filled it? You’re clearly bonkers.

    ben10
    Member

    Was thinking more for everyday riding

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Subscriber

    Was thinking what, more for everyday riding?

    hels
    Member

    I hate camelbaks, all sweaty and nasty, swinging about and interfering with my radicalness. Any ride under 3 hours and 2 bottles on the bike, tools and tubes in saddle bag, pump on bike, key and phones in pocket. And cleaning thems a bitch. I even have one of those effete tri-athlete/sportif bags on the stem for extra stowage. Anything but the nasty camelbak.

    project
    Member

    dam when its full of water it weighs a ton cant help carrying all the weight on my back

    A dam is a man made or natural construction that holds back water by building a wall or obstruction accoss a valley, and very few animals can cary a ton on their backs.

    Premier Icon somafunk
    Subscriber

    I never ride with a camalbak (or similar), i hate them with a passion. I’m firmly in the one or two bottle camp, and as i run tubeless i don’t worry bout punctures, sometimes if i’m heading out in the Galloway hills i’ll take a teeny wee chain tool and tubeless patch and co2 pump in a seatpack but that’s it – in 20+ years of riding i have yet to make use of it or need an allen key. If i run out of water when up in the hills i fill up from a stream or hillside spring, I must admit i do get amused when i see folk at trail centres carrying massive packs bulging wi all sorts of kit but i guess if folk feel more secure carrying so much then who am i to scoff?, if they’re happy to carry it then it’s no skin off my nose so to speak.

    steve_b77
    Member

    I think this may be what you’re looking for; on rides under 2 hours and XC racing bottle on the frame, anything over that a camelbak suits me just fine

    khegs
    Member

    Both, just take a bottle for short rides, and take the camelbak bladder as well for longer ones.

    I only ever put plai water in the camelbak, sports drinks stuff goes in the bottle, easier to wash, cheaper to replace if it goes a bit mank

    a pack you get on with helps too, I hated using the bladder until I got one of those odd looking wingnut packs, the mule I had before (old style one) seemed to sit weirdly when the bladder was full, ymmv

    ben10
    Member

    As im saying camel pack are bottle picked my pack up yesterday when out on the bike and dam when its full of water it weighs a ton cant help carrying all the weight on my back. Ok was a xc race but can’t help

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    my hovercraft is full of eels

    wobbliscott
    Member

    I hate hanging crap off my bike. I’ve a small camelback loco with a 2l bladder – and guess what? You don’t HAVE to brim it if you’re on a short ride. Can fit all I need in the pockets and it has an expandable pouch to carry a lightweight jacket/kagoul if the weather looks dodgy or changeable. The thing is comfy and not noticeable and I don’t have to stop to pick up my bottle every time I clatter over rocks or drops. Advantage is the extra weight is not on your bike so makes it easier to move your bike around underneath you, and I find the handy adjustable straps prevent it from ‘waggling’ around. It even keeps your back warm on a cold day. As for sweat – if you’re not sweating, you’re not working hard enough 😉 but i sweat like a pig on my bike anyway so it’s not an issue for me.

    Each to their own. I’ve considered using it instead of a bottle and saddlebag on my road bike.

    One thing I would like to see is a camelback with two 1ltr bladders in side pockets instead on one 2ltr bladder against your back. This means you could have water in one and High 5 or similar in the other, and if you are on a longer ride and you have your bladder brimmed and are taking some extra tools, spares and food with you, then it all gets a bit tight and the bladder is harder and conforms less so is a bit less comfy on your back. Though its only an issue until you suck the first 0.5 ltrs or so out of it.

    b r
    Member

    Them that don’t use a Camelbak for normal riding, do you carry a first aid kit?

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    Most rides I do these days are about 90mins at most. I can survive that long without drinking so rarely take either.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    find a pack that fits, put in it what you need? Don’t take it for racing?

    matther01
    Member

    Funk – I hope you use somekind of sterilising agent in your water otherwise you’re very likely carrying worms! 😯

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    I must admit i do get amused when i see folk at trail centres carrying massive packs bulging wi all sorts of kit but i guess if folk feel more secure carrying so much then who am i to scoff?, if they’re happy to carry it then it’s no skin off my nose so to speak.

    and generally it’s got a pump, tube or 2 (even if tubeless), multi tool, first aid kit and maybe a jacket. Enough to avoid walking home normally

    b r
    Member

    Most rides I do these days are about 90mins at most. I can survive that long without drinking so rarely take either.

    That’s barely worth getting the bike out, unless it’s your commute?

    Premier Icon somafunk
    Subscriber

    What use is a first aid kit really?, if a wound is that severe a plaster or small bandage is not going to be much use. The only time time i’ve needed (sorta) a first aid kit (or a sling) was a daft front wheel wash out on a singletrack path in the galloway hills that left me with small compound fracture of my left elbow, i made a sling out of my riding jersey and limped gingerly 12miles back to the car whilst “Oooing and Ahhing” all the way.

    If i have got worms i’ve had them for since i was a kid in that case – being brought up in Argyll our tap water used to come straight from a feed pipe from the hiilside burn that ran past our house, sometimes it was so peat stained in periods of wet weather that it ran blood red – but still tasted nice.. after we strained the bits and lumps out of it that is, i’d rather drink water from a clean running scottish burn or hillside spring than drink the chlorinated and fluoride poisoned treated crap that comes from the tap.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    What use is a first aid kit really?

    stop bleeding, sling, snake bite (more of an issue for me), close wound, clean up stuff. All things that are useful when miles from home or help.
    This was a recent race requirement

    A First Aid kit comprising: 2 x crepe bandages, 2 x non-adhesive wound dressings, 6 x steri-strip wound closures, 1 x
    triangular bandage, surgical gloves.

    Seems good so is now my trail one.

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    Who wants to drink out of a bottle covered in sh1t thrown up from the trail ? Camelback for me and as noted above on a short ride empty or just a small amount of water.

    headpotdog
    Member

    I don’t understand the “unhygenic” argument against Camelback’s. Just empty it and put the bladder in the freezer when you’re not using it. Sorted 😉

    Bottle whenever possible, If I need to carry a backpack for other reasons then i’ll take a bladder in the pack.

    Horses for courses innit?

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    My first aid kit for riding- a packet of those compeed blister plasters (brilliant for trailside flesh patching, they stop stuff rubbing so stop scrapes from being a pain in the bum- and I’m told can also patch innertubes), a couple of tramadol in case i ever want to walk off a hill with a broken leg or something, some antacids and some imodium 😉 All a chap could desire.

    Don’t really understand how anyone can hate a camelbak. Really, what’s to hate? I like riding without mine from time to time, pentlands rides are usually just a bottle and a saddlebag with a tube and gas cans, but it’s no bother to wear a decent pack. Not sweaty or uncomfortable, don’t move around, only heavy if you carry your brick collection…

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    That’s barely worth getting the bike out, unless it’s your commute?

    When you only have 90mins spare, it’s a perfect amount of time. But then I have good riding five minutes from my door.

    gribble
    Member

    I used to carry a bottle and saddle bag, with co2 inflator and a tube. Worked well until I had to change a flat and the inflator was empty, spare tube worn through from being stuffed in the tight saddle bag.

    Now I just carry a proper pump and a couple of tubes in a camel back. Extra weight is annoying, but the long walks home are more annoying.

    b r
    Member

    What use is a first aid kit really?, if a wound is that severe a plaster or small bandage is not going to be much use.

    If you’ve no first aid kit, where are you getting the plaster/bandage from?

    Last summer we were riding out in the Borders and my buddy split his shin on a daft little rock. Lucky we’d some of those steri-strips, otherwise the ride I’d been canned as it just wouldn’t stop bleeding.

    And on a winter night ride late last year another face-planted and it took the contents of 2 first aid kits to keep his face together until we could formulate a plan to go get a car to the nearest point to get him off the hill.

    But, I rode the GT7 with just a bottle (pump and mini-tool), as I was never more than 10 mins from the car plus Marshalls every few miles who could summon help.

    rob jackson
    Member

    b r – Member
    Most rides I do these days are about 90mins at most. I can survive that long without drinking so rarely take either.

    That’s barely worth getting the bike out, unless it’s your commute?

    POSTED 9 HOURS AGO # REPORT-POST

    90 minute rides int he evening are ace, i am 100% sure one of our 90 minute rides will be better than a 3hr one of yours 🙂

    Premier Icon shortcut
    Subscriber

    Bottle most of the time (camel back 2 or 3 times a year). As for the grammar and spelling – no comment aside for that folk in glass houses really shouldn’t throw stones.

    If I am heading out miles from civilisation them maybe I will take a first aid kit but the rest of the time – no I don’t. Roadies don’t carry them and earth is a lot softer and more forgiving than tarmac.

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