Bunch of tools

Home Forum Bike Forum Bunch of tools

Viewing 33 posts - 1 through 33 (of 33 total)
  • Bunch of tools
  • kristoff
    Member

    I’d look at getting..

    Chain tool,
    Chain whip (for holding cassette to remove),
    Cassette lock ring tool,
    BB tool,
    Spoke key,

    Most other parts on a bike are allen keys or spanners so nothing really specialist required.

    tinribz
    Member

    HT BB spanner thing or extractor & big (8?) allen key spanner thing depending on type. Also struggled on with a hacksaw for a longtime before getting some cable cutters, wot a difference.

    Premier Icon tommyhine
    Subscriber

    I take it you don’t know anybody with these tools, I kinda chip in with another guy to make buying the more expensive tools a bit more cost effective

    mogrim
    Member

    Chain tool,
    Chain whip (for holding cassette to remove),
    Cassette lock ring tool,
    BB tool,
    Spoke key,

    Most other parts on a bike are allen keys or spanners so nothing really specialist required.

    That looks like what I’d get, too, perhaps with the addition of some decent cable cutters.

    A smallish chain tool is quite a handy tool to take with you on your rides, I’ve certainly snapped chains and I’d have been stuck without one…

    A long handled 5mm allen key is a godsend, too. Much nicer to use than the crappy little L-shaped ones, something like this:

    tom199
    Member

    So basically i bought a hardtail frame and all the components I need to build my first proper custom bike so now comes the question of tools.
    I have all the basics, Allen keys, spanners, screwdrivers etc. but nothing specialist like chain tool, cassette tool etc.
    I bought the frame with headset, fork and bb already installed.

    I have seen a few ‘starter’ bike tool kits for about £40-65. The bulk of it seems to be basics which I already have but when I look at the price of individual tools it soon adds up to be more than the cost of an off the shelf kit.

    So, any advice on what the minimum level of tools would be to build and regularly maintain my new bike? Or anyone know of any tool kits which are reasonably priced and contain all the basic necessary tools?

    Premier Icon FOG
    Subscriber

    Definitely steer clear of tool sets however good value they look. For every tool you use there will be 4 that you will never touch. I think a decent set of allen and torx keys are essential but things like needle nose pliers and mole grips can come in very handy as well as the specialist tools people have suggested above.
    My best specialist tool has been undoubtedly been cable cutters. Nothing else gives the clean cut you need to thread inners into outers and you will still be using them as long as you have a bike so buy decent ones. Oh, that was dangerous, I suppose we will be all on hydraulic or electric shifting by the end of the decade now I have said that!

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    find a decent multi-tool that has a chain tool on it and that you can carry with you. It’s almost guaranteed to have T25, selection of allen keys as well

    cassette lockring tool, BB tool and a piece of old chain nailed to a stick for a chainwhip

    Premier Icon pembo6
    Subscriber

    My angle grinder (with thin blade) is an excellent cable cutter. Slices straight through cable inners and outers easy. Just put a block of wood under the cable.

    Definitely need a cassette removal tool, chain whip (can use an old chain and a bench vice) and BB tool.

    +1 for long handle hex key. With ball end.

    tom199
    Member

    Thanks for the advice guys, very helpful.

    It seems that there are a variety of cassette tools. I will be fitting an slx 10 speed cassette to a hope pro 2 hub. Could someone tell me the exact tool I would need.

    I have read a few articles on installing a shimano crankset. What is the name of the tool that tightens the crank cap bolt which goes into the end of the spindle?

    havinalaff
    Member

    if you do decide you want a cheap set:

    clicky for £25 tool set

    I have read a few articles on installing a shimano crankset. What is the name of the tool that tightens the crank cap bolt which goes into the end of the spindle?

    If you buy most shimano HT2 bb fitment tools the little star drive type tool come with them.

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    A work stand will make the build a joy, rather than a chore. not an essential though.

    +1 on decent cable cutters too.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    What is the name of the tool that tightens the crank cap bolt which goes into the end of the spindle?

    a “coin”
    (it’s only to snug-up the bearings so you don’t need hardly any force on it)

    dabble
    Member

    +1 for long handle hex key. With ball end.

    -1 for ball ends, unless your spending 20-30 quid on an allen key set as cheapo ones have a tendency to snap off, in my experience. I am a maintenance engineer and when the balls snap off they are an absolute PITA to get out again, I’ve even had to chop off heads and drill bolts out and re-tap. Granted I may be tightening machine cap heads up tighter than a bike but still, why take the risk? if you can get in with the flat end that would be better IMO.

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    Good suggestions. I’d add pedal spanner to that, unless of course your pedals just need a big allen key. Buying my pedal spanner was my “isn’t-life-easier-with-the-right-tool-for-the-job” epiphany.

    Premier Icon paladin
    Subscriber

    .
    I have read a few articles on installing a shimano crankset. What is the name of the tool that tightens the crank cap bolt which goes into the end of the spindle?

    If you buy most shimano HT2 bb fitment tools the little star drive type tool come with them.

    Same as the lidl toolset which I used to build my bike. In addition, I needed a spanner for the BB and a big bolt for the headset.

    Didn’t have a work stand and managed the build, but have one now and it would defo have helped.

    tom199
    Member

    Right I feel as though I’m making progress.

    There seems like an awful lot of different types of grease, is there a multi purpose grease or is necessary to have one for every situation?
    Also I’m assuming people use Loctite on all bolts?

    Milkie
    Member

    Buy a cheap tool kit, replace with half decent stuff when tools break. Spend the rest on a half decent workstand and stool. 😉

    I use Castrol Red Rubber Grease (this will spark a debate on which types of greases!) and blue threadlock for certain bolts.

    Premier Icon portlyone
    Subscriber

    Park BB Tool 2 in 1

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    +1 for a cheap(ish) tool set. I bought one (Ice toolz or x-tools or something) when I started doing my own maintenance. I think the only things I’ve never used from it are the cone spanners. All the tools worked, nothing has broken yet. I buy nicer tools now but only as an extravagance, the cheap ones seem fine for a home mechanic.

    Some cheap tools are frustratingly poor, some work fine. I found my cheap Icetoolz chainwhip to be perfectly fine. The Icetoolz HT2 bb tool was good for most cups, but it relies on an 8mm allen key which is bendy when freeing up a stubborn cup. Superstars 1/2″ drive bb tool is far better (you need a 1/2″ ratchet handle) but doesn’t have the tension bolt tool…which the Icetoolz one does so I keep both. Cyclo long handled (ball on the long end, flat on the short) allen keys from Halfrauds have been pretty good for a few years now and were about £10.

    I got cable/hose cutters from Decathlon which are great. If you need to use a spanner on anything it’s really worth getting a proper dedicated size tool rather than using an adjustable. They slip open and round the bolt you really needed not to round! Park’s chain brute is the only one that I haven’t broken and is small enough to carry on rides. Oh, and a peg spanner for the back of chainring bolts is really handy too.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    There’s good tool kits and bad ones. The Bike Hand one is excellent at the price, CRC’s X-tools line are higher quality, Superstar do a good one too (I don’t like the interchangable handles thing but it’s quite sensible). Buying individual tools soon adds up. Course, some toolkits have relatively few useful tools, padded out with low quality non-bike tools, internal BB tools and the like.

    Also, if you buy tools only as you need them, sooner or later you’ll need one faster than you can buy it.

    As above, a good quality set of allen keys is well worth it, you’ll use them more than any other tool and good ones mean you’re less likely to have problems- they’re not likely to snap, and they’re less likely to damage or strip bolts. Doesn’t have to mean spending a fortune, my workshop set are just Draper Expert but they’ve been in constant use for 10 years now and going strong. £30-ish might see a lot but not over a lifetime.

    Premier Icon johnnystorm
    Subscriber

    Another thumbs up for the superstar range of tools. My tool epiphany was using proper cable cutters instead of pliers. Wowzers.

    Premier Icon pembo6
    Subscriber

    -1 for ball ends, unless your spending 20-30 quid on an allen key set as cheapo ones have a tendency to snap off

    Never had a cheapo brake yet. And they r great for getting into tight places.

    But I think you’re right Dabble. I think you’re tightening machine cap ends much tighter than alloy derailleur pinch bolts, handle grips and brake levers. Ha ha.

    mickolas
    Member

    when talking about cable cutters are any if you talking outers? I use a cheap dremel-alike with cutting disc for outers and wasn’t aware of a specialist tool.

    also cone spanners.

    magnet tool for loose bearings

    tub of grease

    tub of copper antiseize stuff

    threadlock

    degreaser

    I know the last few aren’t tools but they live in my tool kit.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I’ve never snapped off a ball-end, even with my cheaper disposable/loanable tools but I’ve used loads where they’re missing. TBF I’m not sure how people manage it, ball ends are pretty much designed to round bolts out, so how you get enough grip to damage the tool I don’t know.

    dabble
    Member

    cos i’m ‘ard 😉

    (or hamfisted 😳 )

    edit: it’s usually when a bolt is being very stubborn to get out, a bugger to get into and more leverage is required than the ball can handle.

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber

    Workstand makes almost every other tool work betterer. Get one!

    Keep an eye out for used tools. I’ve bought a bunch of bike tools on Craigslist for less than half of what they sell for online, let alone MSRP.

    You lot are so off topic..

    Ball peen hammer 🙂

    Job done.

    ducktape (if it moves and shouldn’t) and WD40 (if it doesn’t move and should)!

    Seriously though,

    a set of allenkeys (worth spending a little more for a quality set)

    set of common torx keys.

    good wire cutters

    small headed screwdriver (philips and flat)

    a BB / crank tool (depends upon your choice of BB)

    I don’t know if I’d buy a chain whip and cassette tool; make friends with your LBS. I can’t imagine they’d charge you for doing it if they know you and you arrive with biscuits. Esp. not if you’re buying the replacement cassette from them.

    Chain tool

    Tire levers

    track pump

    spoke key

    and, as others have said, a workstand makes the whole operation much simpler. You’re alos (IME) less likely to put of maintenance when it’s so easy to hoist the bike up and quickly fettle.

    toys19
    Member

    I agree that you should buy the tools you need, not a set, poor value imho.

    Premier Icon Jon Taylor
    Subscriber

    IF you have NOTHING then a set is great value. I bought my bro a EBC having heard good things about them. When I emigrated I left my big tool box behind and then bought a small CRC set (the smallest one – seemed to be different tools and higher quality than the bigger sets according to the reviews).

    If you go straight off to buy separate tools then $$$

    tom199
    Member

    So I went home last night to find a big box of shiny bike bits had arrived (more exciting than I had ever imagined). I set about installing them and found that with my fairly basic existing tool kit and makeshift work stand (a couple of ratchet straps hooked around the frame and over the garage door runners) I managed to install stem, bars, brakes and rotors, front and rear mechs, cranks and put tyres on the wheels. Not a bad effort I didn’t think for my first time and very addictive seeing as I was only going to check that my seatpost was the correct diameter!
    As I was going I identified some tools which I would definitely need so will pop down to my lbc at lunch today and purchase them, the advice you have given me will definitely help me to decide which ones to buy.

Viewing 33 posts - 1 through 33 (of 33 total)

The topic ‘Bunch of tools’ is closed to new replies.