Rider Profile: Tracy Moseley

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Rider Profile

Traharn spent the day at Bike Park Wales with Soho Bikes who were filming their latest video for Soho Bikes TV. The day was all about riding different wheel sizes to try and answer the impossible question ‘which is best?’. Traharn grabbed a few minutes with some of the riders to find out more about their answer to this question, and more.

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Words – Traharn Chidley
Photos – Dan Wyre Photography

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Name: Tracy Moseley (T-Mo)

Age: 37

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Occupation: Professional Bike Rider

Background: “Racing for over 20 years, started at the age of 15 and have not stopped since.”

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Discipline: “Now, it’s primarily Enduro, but still have a go at everything, cross country, downhill.”

Bikes ridden at SOHO bike test: Trek Remedy 29er and a Trek Remedy 650B

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Favourite?: “I’ve spent the last 3 years on my 29er, and haven’t ridden a 650 in over a year, so found it quite bizarre and equally interesting going back to a 650, but the 29er is my favourite.”

Which felt most fun?: “The last run on the 650 started to feel quite quick, but on the first few runs it felt tiny and I really struggled with it. It felt more lively and rougher; I had to do more with it so it felt quicker, but maybe just less efficient.

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Which felt fastest?: “29er always feels faster, it’s less effort and more efficient, and of course when you’re racing Enduro you need to maintain as much energy as possible.”

If you only had one bike what would it be?: [She asks, "out of any bike?”] “This will probably sound a bit crazy but I’d actually go for short travel 120mm XC style bike, they’re so capable, you can pretty much ride anywhere, just a little slower. I’ve had so many years going as fast as I can on my Downhill bike, I don’t really miss that now, I want to be able to ride everywhere, up and down, and I don’t mind going a little slower on the descents to enjoy pedalling more.”

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Do you think one bike can do all?: “Yeah I think so, a lot of people have a 160mm Enduro bike, but I wouldn’t like to slog a 160mm bike around. A 120mm travel bike would be my compromise.”

What is the biggest change you’ve seen in Mountain Biking?: “The professionalism of the athletes within racing, when I was 15/16 no one really had an idea of the training that should be involved, or which diets would be helpful. No one really planned what they were doing, just jumped on a bike and it was really fun. Those times have changed; look at the DH world cup scene, everyone’s got a trainer and kind of knows what they’re doing; all training and eating correctly. Which is really cool, it’s become a sport you can take seriously from all levels, not just on skills and insane ability of the rider, but as an athlete. Riders are physically fit now, gaining respect across the board and not just from mountain bikers who appreciate how skilled we are.”

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

What will/should be the next step in Mountain Biking?: “I’d love to see it more main stream, have more coverage on the television, in the newspapers; have it as an equal sport to football, cricket, rugby. It would be nice for riders to be seen on the same level as a footballer and get the deserved coverage and financial support for the risk and effort they put in. Road cycling has that credibility, but mountain cycling isn’t there yet, it’s kept more underground, which is kind of cool and quite fun, but for the riders trying to make a living out of it, the risk and effort they’re putting in, isn’t getting rewarded as much as it should be. Apart from a small percentage, most professional riders are making just enough to not have to work.”

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

You retired last year? Yet you don’t seem to be slowing down: “I’m trying to retire, but what I wanted to do was take a step back from having the Worlds Series as my main focus, putting all my effort into 8 races, training like a crazy person battling to defend my title. I’m adapting to the next stage of my life, I’m getting married this year and want a family, there’s certain things that can’t go along side racing, so I do have to slow down. But I don’t think I’ll really ever stop racing and riding, I love doing it, and hopefully post kids I’ll still be doing it, but just for fun and not at that intense level. It’s been a fun year transitioning, doing more local races, riding and helping younger upcoming kids and finding a different path within the sport.”

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

What changes have you seen with women in the sport?: “It’s great to see so many women on bikes, I still feel like we struggle getting girls to transition from riding to racing, but that’s something we will forever struggle with, so long as girls are out there giving it a go, having fun and staying healthy that’s all that matters. It’s great that the important step of accepting girl riders has been made, it’s not just a boy’s sport anymore and a girl isn’t stereotyped or judged if they ride too.

After a good day on the bike, what’s your go to meal?: “Ooooh, I don’t really have one, probably something sweet, I’ve just had a Bike Park Wales carrot cake, so I’ll go with that, it was pretty good.”

Tracey Moseley Trek Dan Wyre Photography

Comments (1)

  1. Such a brilliant rider, makes everything look so butter smooth. Such a shame that she isn’t recognised properly outside MTB

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