Shimano GRX RX820 – New Gravel Groupset Goes 12 Speed!

by 44

Today Shimano has launched its new GRX gravel groupset – Shimano GRX RX820.

The brief highlights are that it’s now 12 speed and that, by using Shimano’s Microspline cassette, it can now offer a 10T smallest sprocket to give a bigger top gear (or a wider gear range overall).

There’s more to it than that, though. GRX RX820 will now be available in three, very different, versions that should suit the many ways in which riders have interpreted ‘gravel’. There’s a racy, 1×12 10-45T version, there’s a pretty versatile 2×12 (11-34 or 11-36T) and there’s a very intriguing 1×12 10-51T set up.

Let’s get into it then:

Get yourself some gravel soul, right there

Shimano states: “With a focus on the heart and soul of gravel cycling, Shimano mechanical GRX receives this 12-speed upgrade delivering top-tier performance without an over-the-top price. Since gravel is all about personal expression and freedom to choose how and where to ride, Shimano GRX includes three unique 12-speed mechanical drivetrain personalities to cover the full spectrum of riders and rides.”

GRX ‘narrow range’ 1×12, 10-45T

This version of GRX820 is aimed at the ‘American’ or ‘London’ gravel world. With a wide 10-45T twelve-speed cassette, it should give you enough of a range to race on and to make it up and over the rolling hills that you’ll typically find on many gravel races and sportives. The ‘RD-RX822-GS’ rear mech features Shimano’s Shadow RD+ clutch to keep the chain on, paired with a narrow-wide 40T or 42T chainring up front. This is the closest to SRAM’s XPLR gearing and is a popular stock setup for most gravel bikes that you’ll see in the shops.

GRX 2×12, 11-34T

Nope, the front derailleur (still) isn’t dead. While the one-by GRX offers a good spread of gears, what if you want more range? Or closer ratios? Or the same bike has to do road and gravel duties with different tyres? Shimano has you covered here with its 2×12 RX820 setup. It features a single option 48/31T chainset which mates with a 12 speed 11-34 or 11-36T cassette, giving a pretty low low of 31 x 36T. Note that this groupset uses normal Hyperglide cassettes with an 11T small ring.

GRX 1×12, 10-51T


Now this version of new GRX RX820 is going to be of great interest to some people as it pairs drop bar shifters with Shimano’s widest range 10-51T mountain bike cassette, effectively giving your gravel bike the same range of gears as a modern mountain bike. (Albeit with a 40 or 42T chainring)

The rest of the GRX RX820 groupset

The other components are pretty common between the different arms of the groupset. The brakes are hydraulic and still use the excellent and highly praised lever shape and action of the original GRX. For one-by groups, there’s the option of a ‘clean’ left hand lever or one with a ‘shift’ lever that’ll actuate a mechanical dropper where the shifter would otherwise be. Unfortunately the inline hydraulic ‘chicken’ bar top lever seems to have quietly gone away, though we don’t see why you can’t fit the previous generation anyway.

Wheels – you can’t have a Microspline future without the wheels to let you do that. There will be hubs and whole wheels available. Initially, like when Microspline originally appeared, Shimano is the only shop in town, apart from DT Swiss who apparently already have Microspline replacements ready for its CX wheels. Expect the likes of Hope to catch up pretty quickly, though… For now, though, there’s a single option when it comes to wheels – some very smart-looking carbon RX880 wheels with GRX Microspline (or HG for the 2×12 setup).

The elephant in the room – no Di2

There’s no Di2 version. Or at least not yet. For now, though, if you want electric shifting, you’ll have to make like a cyclocrosser and co-opt one of Shimano’s road groups for your devious purposes. And, at least to add to the ‘mechanical is still cool’ vibe, Shimano’s third tier road groupset; Shimano 105 today announces a mechanical version to go with its, oh, Di2 version that came out last summer. Keep hanging in there, electric gear fans!

There is some good news for more budget-minded riders. There’s also a ‘600’-level GRX groupset launching today too. This offers both one-by and two-by chainsets, along with mechanical STI levers and hydraulic brakes. The rear (and front) mechs and cassettes are shared by both groups.

Pricing

The good news is that new GRX 820 appears to be in stock right now at UK distributor, Madison, so you can get ordering and be 12 speeding by next week…

Here is an idea of the prices:

  • GRX RX820 STI Levers – 12 speed mechanical STI lever, bled with hydraulic brake- £349 per side.
  • GRX RX820 STI Levers, no brake included – £249.99 per side. Callipers £74 and £79
  • GRX RX820 12 speed mechanical rear derailleur (max 36T, max 45T or max 51T) – £119.99
  • GRX RX820 12 speed Hollowtech 11 chainset – single ring or double ring – £229.99
  • GRX RX880 Wheels – £579 front, £719.99 rear
  • GRX 610:
  • GRX 610 STI levers – 12 speed mechanical, bled with hydraulic brake – £279.99 a side
  • GRX Chainsets £149.99 for all, double or single ring.

And that’s it for the new Shimano GRX RX820 12 speed groupset. Like what you see? Bothered by a lack of Di2? Not bothered by the extra gear? Very excited and already planning a new bike around it? Let us know in the comments…

Join our mailing list to receive Singletrack editorial wisdom directly in your inbox.

Each newsletter is headed up by an exclusive editorial from our team and includes stories and news you don’t want to miss.

Sign up to receive awesome editorial content from Hannah every week.

Check your inbox for our confirmation email and click the link to activate your newsletter.
We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.


Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 44 total)
  • Shimano GRX RX820 – New Gravel Groupset Goes 12 Speed!
  • rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    Some of us have been runnj g a 51t cassette without mods since GRX came out. Albeit 11sp

    didnthurt
    Full Member

    GRX was such a clever product at launch and left an easy progression path with any new technologies.
    Shimano pretty much cherry picked bits from their other road and off-road groupsets, but only using older 11 speed technology. I’ve had my GRX since 2020 and it has been a good product to use but has also had it’s faults.

    The chainset only take GRX specific rings.
    My right shifter failed to shift recently.
    Both brake calipers started to leak and were replaced wth Hope.

    mtbfix
    Full Member

    thepathlesspedalled will be happy to see the front mech still going strong. No friction option though?

    ampthill
    Full Member

    Presumably one can run this with with an MTB chainset in 1x configuration. Another good option.

    nixie
    Full Member

    Let’s hope for some 11speed deals 😀.

    petefromearth
    Full Member

    Let’s hope for some 11speed deals 😀.

    Slight tangent – will 11spd GRX STIs work with an 11 speed XTR rear mech?

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    I’m more interested in Microshift Sword 2×10 and 1×10….

    Daffy
    Full Member

    My GRX 815 DI2 has been utterly faultless on 2 bikes with a combined mileage of 25k km.  I’ve replaced 1 chain in all that time.

    The 12s has some big shoes to fill.

    slackboy
    Full Member

    will 11spd GRX STIs work with an 11 speed XTR rear mech?

    Cable pull is different but you can use a tanpan to use 11 speed road/gravel shifters with MTB mechs

    Tanpan

    didnthurt
    Full Member

    @daffy that’s really impressive. I’ve done maybe half your distance and am on my 4th chain, second cassette, second chainring and third bottom bracket. I do like to ride in the winter slop though.

    mark.t
    Free Member

    Will there be a 73mm BB option on the crankset?  There are quite a few gravel frames that have a 73mm BB shell, so an MTB crankset is often required.  I’ve but XT or SLX on both of my gravel bikes because the GRX ones won’t fit.

    chakaping
    Free Member

    Some of us have been runnj g a 51t cassette without mods since GRX came out. Albeit 11sp

    The 812 (?) rear mech takes that without any hanger extenders or whatnot?

    I was thinking of trying an 11-46t SLX cassette I’ve got spare. If that works I see no need for 12sp personally.

    cx_monkey
    Full Member

    pretty sure there’s quite a reasonable number of boost spaced gravel frames on the market now, which would mean any boost hub with miscrospline would work with this, on those frames? Unless this microspline is different to the microspline used on the ‘mtb’ kit….? And yeah, GRX specific chain rings are a bt of a pain still – I used a Praxis crank instead (Alba I think…) cos it has a removeable spider and uses the SRAM 3 bolt interface, so any number of 1x NW rings available for it. Bit of a mish mash of stuff – ‘old’ 11 spd GRX 600 mech and shifters, Praxxis crank and a Superstar 38T chainring. 11-46T XT cassette. Standard caliper on the back, but swapped out the front for a non-series shimano 4 pot caliper. seems to all work well together though!

    rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    The 812 (?) rear mech takes that without any hanger extenders or whatnot?

    Yep

    Shimano Deore CS-M5100 cassette

    kelvin
    Full Member

    Let’s hope for some 11speed deals

    The 12 speed stuff is at whole different price point to the 11 speed stuff.

    Scratch that… RRP is pretty close, isn’t it.

    jameso
    Full Member

    +1 for the mechanical and keeping doubles approach but 48-31 is still a big chainset (and quite a gap between ring sizes)

    Still waiting for something in the 42-28 range from Shimano. 10s MTB doubles were great for gravel bikes.

    chakaping
    Free Member

    Yep

    Cheers boss

    cy
    Full Member

    The 10-51 1×12 new GRX uses the XT cassette and chain, so on a more drop bar mtb type bike you would just use an SLX, XT or XTR chainset and away you go.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Still waiting for something in the 42-28 range from Shimano. 10s MTB doubles were great for gravel bikes.

    I have 46/30t GRX 10sp from Ribble’s silly sale (£30).
    Combined with a 11-36 rear cassette it is great on my do it all bike, even winching up hills with pannier on.
    At some point I will add goatlink an an 11-40 cassette and have (albeit with larger jumps) full touring / off road winching ratios.

    sillyoldman
    Full Member

    @james0 – and Ben Delaney was complaining that the single ring options don’t go big enough. UK wants lower ratios, US wants higher? We’re a tough crowd…

    nedrapier
    Full Member

    Still waiting for something in the 42-28 range from Shimano. 10s MTB doubles were great for gravel bikes.

    I’ve got an XT M785, 175mm, 40-28T in Black BNIB (a posh box, too) if that would help anyone?

    jameso
    Full Member

    I have 46/30t GRX 10sp from Ribble’s silly sale (£30).
    Combined with a 11-36 rear cassette it is great on my do it all bike, even winching up hills with pannier on.
    At some point I will add goatlink an an 11-40 cassette and have (albeit with larger jumps) full touring / off road winching ratios.

    I don’t mind larger jumps at the back but I prefer a smaller gap at the front. When the jump up front is bigger the compensation shifts are needed and the whole thing seems a faff Vs 1X. I rarely need higher than 42×11 on a gravel bike and with 11-34 at the back a 40 or 42 is used like a 1×8 or 1×9 most of the time, with a lower 1x option for climbs, loaded riding etc. So the 28-40 XT I’ve been on for a while is really nice, you shift up front and often don’t need compensation at the back. Anyway.. subjective stuff, not saying it’s better, just that the range of choice isn’t great.

    Ben Delaney was complaining that the single ring options don’t go big enough

    I’m man enough to be seen with smaller rings and do ok on them : ) I just don’t need to pedal past about 25-28mph on a gravel bike, or at least not for long and there’s no sprints for bragging rights on my rides.

    I’ve got an XT M785, 175mm, 40-28T in Black BNIB (a posh box, too) if that would help anyone?

    I would but I’m on 170s. If you sell the arms I’d take the rings.

    kelvin
    Full Member

    Gravel riding in the USA ≠ gravel riding in the UK.

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    thepathlesspedalled will be happy to see the front mech still going strong. No friction option though?

    Hasn’t Russ endorsed another friction shifter for precisely this sort of application?

    Edit- here you go Soma/dia compe apparently:

    Glad they’re kept mechanical shifting, also glad to hear mechanical shifting 105 is out (hydraulic disc braking only though).

    I will of course be browsing old 11 speed GRX prices now of course because new and shiny with a bonus click means the old stock getting run out at more affordable prices…

    Of course one thing is missing from the autumn hype train (so far), where’s the promised CUES for drop-bars eh? Staggered embargo or just not a priority?

    jameso
    Full Member

    use an SLX, XT or XTR chainset and away you go

    10T gap’s a bit small. Fussy aren’t I … but it’s no issue, I just buy AM rings for my own bikes.

    I think OEM and AM spec could be a bit wider in this area but I also think Shimano do more customer research than I do so I’m probably an outlier. I do see a lot of people walking gravel bikes up hill that aren’t really that steep/hard and some of that is gearing, but there’s solutions in what’s available already.

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    I think OEM and AM spec could be a bit wider in this area but I also think Shimano do more customer research than I do so I’m probably an outlier. I do see a lot of people walking gravel bikes up hill that aren’t really that steep/hard and some of that is gearing, but there’s solutions in what’s available already.

    I don’t think you’re an outlier, I think Shimano are often quite conservative and know stretching ranges to win the numbers game could result in more returns. Gravel bikes with ‘sub-compact’ 2x make a lot of sense, I think lots of people/companies are still feeling out the ratios though.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    I think OEM and AM spec could be a bit wider in this area but I also think Shimano do more customer research than I do so I’m probably an outlier. I do see a lot of people walking gravel bikes up hill that aren’t really that steep/hard and some of that is gearing, but there’s solutions in what’s available already.

    I am not sure you are an outlier.
    I wonder, and you will know more about this, if there is an issue of product managers in big corporations such as Shimano looking at US or Asian gravel and riding more than UK/European riding. They need to understand steep and slippery hills more.
    And perhaps I would also say there is an issue with companies specifying things – basically so many gravel / do it all bikes come with CX gearing. Road gearing seems fixated on what a professional rider would use, not your average fitness punter. Therefore so many of these gravel / do it all bikes come either way over geared or 1x because 1x.

    I too would prefer a slightly smaller jump on front rings, avoiding that downshift at the back when you swap, and put up with some bigger jumps at the rear. Maybe 46/36 and an 11-42…?

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    I’m a fan of the spa-cycles approach:

    “Super compact”

    Basically take your old touring 3x, 110/74 BCD crank play with the inner/middle rings to give a range of 16T difference options and lengths, bolt on a dorky bash guard than most punters will remove immediately then double the asking price…

    Personally I’m more tempted to buy this in 170mm and and this in 42t for use with an 11-36 or 11-40 cassette. But I’m weird and don’t see a problem with square taper BBs.

    rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    and Ben Delaney was complaining that the single ring options don’t go big enough. UK wants lower ratios, US wants higher? We’re a tough crowd…

    The same Ben Delaney who reviewed the new Santa Cruz Stigmata as ground breaking with its clearance and slacker head angle and when I asked how it was different to what some gravel bikes have had for around 3 years he couldn’t answer…..wait, he did say it had a door in the down tube…..yea Ben, no one’s done that before have they!

    MSP
    Full Member

    Shimano do more customer research than I do

    Both shimano and sram are well behind the curve on crank length offerings, 165mm cranks are still like hens teeth, while many riders are now wanting even shorter. So I don’t actually think they are aware of the market so much as they expect to be able to dictate that the market.

    sillyoldman
    Full Member

    Gravel riding in the USA ≠ gravel riding in the UK.

    That there is the problem.

     

    Good that the group can now be mixed with Shimano 12 spd MTB chainsets for lower ratios.

    Those who want bigger ratios can fit bigger tyres….

    ampthill
    Full Member

    Sadly I’m so use to to Shimano getting the chainsets wrong I’ve sort of ignored it.

    I’m not sure why shimano can’t see that consumers want flexibility. There are clearly people happy are happy with a bottom gear of 30×36 or 40×42. But that doesn’t work for me. My gravel bike is 26×36 with a spa cycles sub compact and 650b wheels. I could go lower particularly if I had bigger wheels.

    In the summer I road a today gravel event in Wales. People were on a wide range of bikes. But we all went up the same hills. Non were technical and the MTBs were using their gears down to say 32×50. No idea why any one think that those on drop bar riders wouldn’t want the option of a similarly low gear

    ampthill
    Full Member

    Gravel riding in the USA ≠ gravel riding in the UK.

    Yep the US have gravel roads that hit 13,000 ft. Should the group sets really be based on a narrow spectrum of flatish well published races. Rather than say the Tour Divide. I think I read that there were no Di2 bikes in this years event. Loads on sram electronic shutters apparently. Presumably, in part, because the riders on drop bars can use it to access MTB gearing

    mattsccm
    Free Member

    Another daft tiny cog.

    Why not run something like a 13 up? You could go slightly smaller on the front as  and thus a smaller bottom gear . Of course run 2x so you don’t have those silly gaps.

    rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    11-51 cassette, GRX rear mech and brifters XT crank with 36t ring

    PXL_20221205_133641508

    timmycee
    Free Member

    Just confirming @rocketdog’s comments on 51t cassettes already being compatible with GRX, albeit on mine I used a Garbaruk cage. Shifts perfect, indiscernible from factory derailleur. 36×51 gets me up anything in Shropshire, with the only limitation being pie intake and lack of fitness. I’d post of pic but it’s a PITA.

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    Here’s a question, the new road/gravel 12 speed mechanical is it still using the same cable pull? Would the RX820 mech be backwards compatible with 11/10 speed levers?

    It’s not like 10 and 11 speed cassettes in wider ranges aren’t available and if you’ve got perfectly good levers already, are people really that bothered by the extra sprocket?

    iainc
    Full Member

    I was hoping they’d release this in di2 soon, I have 11 speed GRX mechanical on one of the gravel bikes and it’s a bit tired. Think I’ll hang off for electronic and just replace chain for now.

    other gravel bike has 12 speed GX AXS and Rival AXS etap  groupset  and is nicer on the gear side, but I hate the brakes !

    ampthill
    Full Member

    Here’s a question, the new road/gravel 12 speed mechanical is it still using the same cable pull? Would the RX820 mech be backwards compatible with 11/10 speed levers?

    yep we need to know that….

    jameso
    Full Member

    I wonder, and you will know more about this, if there is an issue of product managers in big corporations such as Shimano looking at US or Asian gravel and riding more than UK/European riding. They need to understand steep and slippery hills more.

    Not 100% sure, I don’t think so – but probably safe to say they won’t see the ‘UK gravel’ approach of underbiking on MTB terrain to the extent that happens here, as part of ‘gravel’. I’d say they’re right tbh, gravel bikes get lost when they’re trying to be more MTB and become bad all-road bikes (imho). Alternative chainset ratios are just for loaded riding or long days with steep hills. And part of my wish for sub-compacts is aesthetic, that I don’t really want a 10-51 and a massive mech on the back of my own gravel bikes. 12-36 is fine with a reasonable 2x chainset spec. It’s all so variable + subjective though, hence why I would like a bit more choice.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 44 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.