Pity the apostrophe.

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  • Pity the apostrophe.
  • whitestone
    Member

    It’s not that hard – if you apply thought to what you are writing.

    whitestone
    Member

    @trailof – those aren’t missing apostrophes πŸ™„

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Odd name for an apostrophe…

    mogrim
    Member

    those aren’t missing apostrophes

    They,re fallen apostrophes. Cast from the light of the Punctuation God’s.

    Ok, not an apostrophe, but still funny.

    They,re fallen apostrophes

    πŸ˜†

    Premier Icon orangespyderman
    Subscriber

    If you haven’t already, you should read this

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    When I was in school we did apostrophes over and over again – from the age of about five to fifteen. And people still **** it up all the time.

    What hope for the world?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I blame the parentheses.

    whitestone
    Member

    They mustn’t have had a solidus education.

    bikebouy
    Member

    CaptainFlashheart – Member
    or is approximately 80% of the population really that thick?

    Yip, y’o is write.

    Regular nouns are nouns that form their plurals by adding either the letter s or es (guy, guys; letter, letters; actress, actresses; etc.). To show plural possession, simply put an apostrophe after the s. Rule 2b. Do not use an apostrophe + s to make a regular noun plural.

    Try explaining any of that to the 80%, or me..

    #pointlesspedantry

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    Does one check grammar with a dictionary?

    Jamie
    Member

    I feel OP wants to have his cake and eat it.

    On the one hand they want to see proper grammar, but on the other they are happy to bastardise the Queen’s English using words like ‘moar’, ‘KWALITEE’ and ‘analwarhammer’.*

    So in summary, I’ll say 6 pages, one flounce and a child conceived during the thread’s lifecycle.

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    *I may have made the last one up.

    A post trophy

    fanatic278
    Member

    There’s a mathematical 50/50 chance of getting “you’re” and “your” right. So why do people get “you’re” wrong 80%* of the time?!?

    Personally, I have trouble with “affect” and “effect”. But that doesn’t make me feel any more lenient towards people getting “you’re” incorrect.

    * statistics may not be accurate

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    There’s a mathematical 50/50 chance of getting “you’re” and “your” right.

    50/50 means there’s a mathematical chance of one which is a certainty. You mean a 50:50 chance.

    hth πŸ™‚

    Is it really that hard, or is approximately 80% of the population really that thick?

    Answer’s [sic erat scriptum] below, if you please.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Is it really that hard, or is approximately 80% of the population really that thick?

    52%?

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Judging by what I read in the comments section of local papers, and on Facebook, YouTube and other social media, a sizeable number of people are barely literate and struggle to spell words that most children have sorted by Year Two.

    So I think expecting them to handle something as complicated as an apostrophe is probably a bit much.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Fumin’

    Does one check grammar with a dictionary?

    For correct usage.

    fanatic278
    Member

    There’s a mathematical 50/50 chance of getting “you’re” and “your” right.

    50/50 means there’s a mathematical chance of one, which is a certainty. You mean a 50:50 chance.

    hth

    I believe you missed a comma there. hth πŸ˜€

    globalti
    Member

    There’s even an Apostrophe Protection Society: http://www.apostrophe.org.uk/

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    why do people get “you’re” wrong 80%* of the time?!?

    Personally, I have trouble with “affect” and “effect”.

    Same.

    Your and you’re is a pretty simple one though: “you’re” is just a shortening of “you are”.

    Affect/effect is a bit trickier though I think. Partly because they have closely related meanings and partly because some of us have accents that makes them sound the same when spoken aloud.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Does one check grammar with a dictionary?

    No, I just ask her carer.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    Affect/effect is a bit trickier though I think.

    This sort of confusion is just an effectation.

    whitestone
    Member

    Affect/effect – one is a verb and one a noun.

    You affect the outcome. (verb)
    You had an effect on the outcome. (noun)

    There’s quite a few of these types of pairs in English.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    This sort of confusion is just an effectation.

    And an inaffectual one at that.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Affect/effect – one is a verb and one a noun.

    Actually, both can be used as nouns or verbs.

    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/affect
    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/effect

    Which doesn’t help the confusion.

    Ain’t English grand?

    Partly because they have of closely related meanings and partly because some of us have of accents that makes them sound the same when spoken aloud.

    [sic]

    πŸ˜€

    FeeFoo
    Member

    Is it really that hard

    Its obviously hard enough and thats why a lot of people dont use it properly. I question whether its really needed.
    If your good at English or your not, you can still make yourself understood.

    You can all read these sentences and make sense of them so do we really need apostophes any more?

    fanatic278
    Member

    Is it really that hard
    Its obviously hard enough and thats why a lot of people dont use it properly. I question whether its really needed.
    If your good at English or your not, you can still make yourself understood.

    You can all read these sentences and make sense of them so do we really need apostophes any more?

    I read those sentences but didn’t digest the content. My brain was too busy trying to translate the non-English into English. And also not being able to concentrate due to the sheer fury that your (intentional) lazy grammar/spelling/punctuation instilled in me.

    On forums I tend to skip reading posts where the spelling/grammar starts off badly. It really does bother me that much. Like nails on a black board. In fact, that’s one of the reasons I stopped going on Bikeradar and would never go anywhere near Pinkbike

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    read those sentences but didn’t digest the content. My brain was too busy trying to translate the non-English into English.

    Self affected struggle.

    CountZero
    Member

    mogrim – Member
    those aren’t missing apostrophes
    They,re fallen apostrophes. Cast from the light of the Punctuation God’s.

    Oh, well done! πŸ˜†

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