Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 260 total)
  • Healthcare workers – how you feeling – what are you anticipating?
  • Premier Icon tjagain
    Subscriber

    Staff nurse here. I have been off for 12 days so not up to date with the latest in my workplace. However my ward was being run down for a change of use so I can see that plan being changed again.
    I am concerned about me being reallocated into acute work if the crisis goes on as I fear it might. This has left me feeling very vulnerable – partly because my skills are out of date and partly because my profession will mean I am at increased risk. I know my situation is much better than those at the real front line but its still making me uneasy. How are you all coping? I know we have community workers, paramedics and ICU folk on here – whats the mood?

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Been a very busy week end preparing and experiencing the first proper effect of this crisis. I was shattered last night when I got home and sick of hearing about the virus.

    Am I’m worried about myself? Not physically I’ll be fine if/when I get it. Mentally it’s going to be a challenge but after the peak, the public eventually getting a grasp and supplies balance out it’ll be a lot easier.

    I’m wary about the risk to my father though so as soon as I so signs I’ll deliberately avoid contact with my parents for a bit.

    In true Nhs style we’ll overcome and march on.

    aphex_2k
    Member

    Clinical nurse / Community mental health anD amhp.

    We’re to ask people of they’ve been abroad or if they have symptoms and stay 1m away. But if we end up forming (sectioning) someone then we go to ED with cops/ambo hand the pt over and hang around while they get triaged and a bed is found.

    BaronVonP7
    Member

    Wife is a Chief Cardiac Physiologist.

    She might be deployed to the wards or out into the community but she thinks (and I think secretly wants) to get deployed into A & E…

    She’s works with an Italian who is getting updates from his mates in the hospitals in Northern Italy.

    Dont think it would be far from truth to characterise her feelings like the troops on the landing craft at the start of Saving Private Ryan.
    Some don’t care.
    Some (management) in denial.
    Some s41tting themselves.
    Most dont know what’s the other side of the loading ramp, but it doesn’t sound good.

    So she’s expecting a s41t storm where all the planning goes out the window and the equipment failures are going to be shown up real quick.

    And from my point of view, you, and her, and all rest, have got to run right into the storm.

    aphex_2k
    Member

    The govt is also planning to dish out $750 to low income / centrelink / pensioners. Which I’m expecting to lead to a huge surge in meth use which is not good at all.

    Premier Icon smogmonster
    Subscriber

    OP – i wouldnt worry too much, i’m sure you’ll be well supported by experienced staff. They’ll likely have a team of relatively inexperienced staff, or those like yourself from other clinical areas, being supervised by staff experineced in ventilated patients. You should recieve some clinical updates before being to even go near a ventilator. I work both as a nurse and an EMT, so i’m seeing it both sides…but the nursing will take priority in the next few months. Although i havent looked after ventilated patients in many moons, i do have lots of experience of unconscious patients requiring manual ventilation and airway management….its going to be interesting times ahead, to understate it slightly.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Subscriber

    And from my point of view, you, and her, and all rest, have got to run right into the storm.

    Am I being selfish? Thats the bit I really don’t want to do! Put me in the “shitting myself” category.

    Smogmonster – I have done ITU nursing but 30 years ago!

    gobuchul
    Member

    And from my point of view, you, and her, and all rest, have got to run right into the storm.

    Am I being selfish? Thats the bit I really don’t want to do! Put me in the “shitting myself” category.

    I can understand why you are concerned, although I agree with the Baron, as healthcare professionals you have to step up. The rest of society needs your help.

    dave661350
    Member

    Healthcare people.

    A simple….

    Thank you.

    BaronVonP7
    Member

    TJ, it’s going to be a war zone, but you’ll be fine – just make sure you’re wearing your helm…

    Oh.

    Well, wear your mask, and I’m sure you’ll be OK.

    🙂

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Subscriber

    🙂

    Hospital doctor here.

    I am very concerned. Perhaps it was my imagination, but my hospital had a definite calm-before-the-storm vibe this weekend. Not too busy, a few people sensibly staying away and those who were in were keen to get home earlier than would otherwise be recommended. A few pockets of chaos as no one has really yet seen any cases so deciding who needs isolation / swabs etc is difficult. We are still finding our feet.

    At the moment if you come to our hospital with a febrile respiratory illness, you are likely to be ‘cohorted’ in a bay with other people that have similar symptoms. That means if you have common-or-garden seasonal flu you may be nursed next to someone with Covid19 and could thus easily be exposed to it (Covid on top of Flu sounds bad to me). That seems crazy right now as only a small proportion of patients with that sort of illness currently have Covid, but it’s a great way to spread it within a vulnerable population. Of course in the coming weeks that is likely to change and cross-infection is likely to become less of a concern (everyone will have Covid).

    In Italy there are reports of orthopaedic surgeons being reassigned to look after (non-invasively) ventilated patients. Anyone that works in healthcare will know how crazy that sounds. So yes, you could be assigned elsewhere TJ but from a nursing perspective, I’d imagine ventilated patients will be looked after by those who have at least a bit of experience – I.e. ITU / ED / respiratory teams.

    Premier Icon db
    Subscriber

    Not a healthcare worker but wife, son and eldest daughter all “front line” in 3 different trusts.

    Calm before the storm I think summarises it well. Contingency plans currently working out how to staff the hospitals/service on a limited % of staff.

    All healthcare professionals have my total admiration

    Premier Icon mattbee
    Subscriber

    Wife is an ACP in ED. First positive case announced yesterday with another 10 being talked about today.
    All staff training and non clinical work shifts cancelled. Says there’s an air of nervousness about the dept this morning.

    Part time EMT here.
    I’ve been contacted to agree to take special leave from the (unrelated) day job and go to work in a ‘mobile response team’ down in Engerland, away from home for week long rotations.
    I’m looking forward to the learning aspects of this. Sh1tting it as well as I’m going to be so far out of my comfort zone. I’ve lots of pals in various roles across the NHS who are all in turmoil while their wards or practices are being adjusted to prepare for an onslaught of new work.

    Premier Icon richardkennerley
    Subscriber

    Hospital microbiology lab tech.

    The protocols change several times a day it seems at the moment. I believe we’ve stopped testing a lot of people who turn up, only testing those admitted. But we’re still getting a helluva lot of swabs.

    If(when) it really takes off, it will be difficult to keep up with the workload, we already have back log. The additional work an increase in inpatients will generate (blood cultures, sputums, mrsa/mssa screening amongst others) will mean the routine work will be delayed and I think ultimately we’ll stop doing some if it.

    Premier Icon notmyrealname
    Subscriber

    I’m anticipating chaos in my trust.

    We’re already unable to cope with the call volume and we’re massively short of masks, hand sanitiser, cleaning wipes etc.

    Thankfully I’m off for a week so I’ll worry about it when I’m back in work.

    dantsw13
    Member

    Thank you, all of you.

    Being ex military, and having s#*t myself prior to deployment, once you are in amongst it, I felt much better than the waiting phase.

    BaronVonP7
    Member

    we’re massively short of masks

    At my Wife’s place they ran out last week.

    Apparently they did manage to get and order in.

    Masks turned up: Dust masks not medical ones.

    Social Worker here (adults). Plans evolving all the time but we’ve been looking at our clients today to consider who’s most at risk and who should be prioritised in the event of social care staff being decimated. This includes those we support who pose a risk to the public. Several hospital wards and care homes have been in touch to request no non essential visits are undertaken. In the short term I may get caught up with some paperwork! Longer term I can see us being redeployed in social care role.

    tagnut69
    Member

    The wife is a manager in a private nursing home, they have banned visitors so far and have a couple of staff self isolating, no sense of panic yet. Things will change when the agencies cant supply staff or refuse to send staff if the home has a positive case there

    Premier Icon edd
    Subscriber

    Healthcare people.

    A simple….

    Thank you.

    This +1

    AED Doc.
    Hmmm calm before the storm.
    I wouldn’t worry about being off and not upto date.
    If you are off for just one day it all changes..

    On Friday ffp3 masks were the only form of PPE that we were told was any good, today they say just wear standard theatre masks unless a proven case, but we are no longer testing so we don’t know who is positive and who is not. My worry (and that of most people I speak to) is that we have already ran out of masks and that is why the advice has changed, effectively we are being put at risk. Anyone knows differently please feel free to enlighten me.

    I am pretty much resigned to the fact that I just need to go to work until I get it, then either have a week on Netflix or die.

    Wife has been told that her med ward might be turned into a resp ward and they are going to be taught how to use ventilators..just like using a toaster right?
    They are still waiting for any form of mask.

    Premier Icon stabilizers
    Subscriber

    The wife’s a neuro physio which is rehab. She says they’ve all been asked to list they’re skill sets. She’s pretty sure there’s not going to be a lot less rehab in the coming months. I know she does assist with helping ventilate patients if she’s on-call so I’ll be surprised if she’s not involved over the next few months.
    Sh!t. I’ve never really thought about it too deeply.

    enigmas
    Member

    Partner’s a lab tech in the regions testing site for suspected covid-19 samples.

    At that lab virology have taken over all of the high category labs from the other departments and are already swamped with samples.

    Perhaps the scary bit is that there’s only 3 or 4 people in the building trained to run the tests, if any of them get sick, or have to self isolate, testing across a large chunk of england will grind to a halt.

    Paramedic for ambulance service and also work in primary care.

    Hospital ED is much quieter, although we as ambulance service appear to be getting usual amount of jobs, lots of anxious self-isolaters (mainly <40, low-risk, most with non-Coronavirus symptoms), still the usual things as well (lots of mental health/OD, poorly managed chronic health problems). I’ve definitely noticed a younger demographic of patients in last few shifts (might just be coincidental), but I’ve not been to many >70 over the weekend (maybe are more wary of contacting us due to the fact we are big vectors of the disease).
    A few very poorly patients that have turned out to be COVID-19 positive, some <70.

    Primary care, all telephone triage, very high threshold for bring people in. Again lots of anxious self-isolaters.

    Some one on twitter says it feels like standing on a beach watching the water being sucked out before the inevitable tsunami.

    I’m sure I’ll get it is I’m going into people’s houses etc. I’m not concerned personally, but worried about being a carrier to parents and parents-in-law who are all late 60s/early 70s, so will avoid seeing them, even if asymptomatic.

    Good luck everyone.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I’d volunteer if I could.

    You can do my nightshift tomorrow if you like?

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Subscriber

    Thanks for your thoughts folks. I still feel like running away but at least I know I am not the only one shitting myself!

    lewis75
    Member

    I know a few paramedics and they have had protocols for dealing with calls change nearly every day over the last week and are burnt out(even more burnt out than normal if that’s even possible!)

    I just want to say a huge thank you to everyone in the NHS right now, it really doesnt get said enough.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    You can do my nightshift tomorrow if you like?

    If your shift involves installing Red Hat Openshift on bare metal whilst not having any medical qualifications then I’ll do it 🙂

    Edukator
    Member

    I’m a similar age to you TJ, I’d turn off my phone, turn off the computer, fill the fridge and freezer, and enter early retirement. Good books and daytime TV till it’s safe to come out.

    You’ve done your bit, leave it to the age groups more likely to survive. Why should you deal with the mess created by a government that refuses to take the most elementary steps to slow the spread of the virus?

    Put me in the “shitting myself” category.

    Seems reasonable, I was more than a little overwrought at school today as I told yet another kid with a new cough that I really couldnt care less that their mum said they had to come in today could the please not come in tomorrow!! Meanwhile we only close if a case is confirmed, but the eleventy hundred kids in self isolation are not being tested.

    You all have my admiration and thanks for not locking yourself away and refusing to take calls.

    mooman
    Member

    Mental health social worker here.
    I still feel ambivalent towards the whole thing. On one hand I read its only the very old or the ones with significant underlying health problems who are at most risk .. fortunately all my family and I are in good health and below the at risk age, so I am not concerned there – but its the knock on effect that causes me concern.

    Shops are ransacked, and things will only get a lot worse as stricter measures get introduced.
    Work wise there is no way we can work from homes. GPs around our way are only doing telephone assessments, so already today there was a big increase in referrals from GPs for crisis and urgent next day mental health assessments … they arent putting eyes so everything is getting through; I have a full day of mental health assessments tomorrow!

    Add to that the usual ones in team who use any excuse to have time off; a couple are already dropping the hint explaining their best friends cousins aunties next door neighbour has coronavirus .. and they too got a bit of a cough .. I am expecting they will be off by end of week and our work load goes totally bonkers!

    An area that I feel will be hit hardest is the care sector. Not many want to do that at best of times … getting new people in when the workload is likely to be double is even more unlikely.

    crikey
    Member

    Meh.

    Recently retired from 20 years in ITU, moved to work in Theatre. I will be asked to go back when things get worse.

    Don’t really want to but I have a set of skills that will be in short supply so I’m in.

    Not looking forward to it, but did it for so long that it’s not scary.

    Anyone who assumes that ITU style nursing is easy, or that we can simply ask other nurses to step in is not being realistic. Anyone who assumes that once on a ventilator things are OK is not being realistic. Anyone who assumes that we can bodge ventilators together at JCB is not being realistic.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    My worry (and that of most people I speak to) is that we have already ran out of masks and that is why the advice has changed, effectively we are being put at risk. Anyone knows differently please feel free to enlighten me.

    Unfortunately you are correct.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    MrsMC is a child protection social worker. Similar views to the other SWs up there.

    Front line healthcare have my utmost respect and admiration at the best of times, and now more than ever.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    Me and the wife both work in acute hospitals. Both mid-50s. I’m t2 diabetic and a teeny bit asthmatic, pleased to say she’s “healthy”.

    Yeah, bit scared. Intending to keep fit without getting knackered and take things as they come. There’s some ded scary projections doing the rounds regarding how many critical care beds they’ll need. Funnily enough there’s no timescale on offer for when ALL that extra kit’s turning up 🙄

    Edukator
    Member

    This smacks of the Iraq war and the “gotta suport the troops” jingoism when all that was really need was to replace Blair with Dominique de Villepin. “Gotta suport the health workers”, well ban people from going out then you **** idiot Johnson. You need a new PM who actually doesn’t give more of a shit about 10s of thousands dying than Blair. Sorry we need Macron so you need to find someone else.

    Premier Icon dannybgoode
    Subscriber

    Mrs D is a staff nurse and currently showing symptoms. It’s madness they’re not testing frontline staff.

    A) she’s got to self isolate for 14 days and she could be fine to work so it’s a waste of resources and b) she works on an acute thoracic ward where surely they’d want to know such things!

    And C) purely selfishly I’ve got to isolate now as well!

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