Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 489 total)
  • Carrying a knife
  • gordimhor
    Full Member

    I have two knives no need to show them on here. I never take them into town which is itself still very rural. I might have one with me when I pass through a town to go canoeing

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Similar to Hannah – I was given a lovely curved ceremonial dagger by a friend from Kyrgyzstan. Which was great. Until I was flying out of Heathrow with it in my (only) carry on bag. Less than a year after 9/11…
    Cue more than a few gun-toting guards giving me search and grief in front of the whole security queue and it being placed in the hold for collection at Glasgow…

    Agree about the EDC lot. It’s definitely got a lot of crossover with gun rights, sovereign citizens and pseudomilitary LARPers.

    Bit harsh. 😂

    BoardinBob
    Full Member

    I own several Opinels. They generally live in the toolbox in the garage. I may have taken one on a bikepacking trip once as it’s also a bottle opener.

    I’ve never once felt the need to have any of them on me when I’m in the office or popping round to Aldi, but then again I don’t spend my days fantasising that I’m John Rambo.

    mert
    Free Member

    If you are on bad day and get “loud” with someone who has just jumped your parking space any passing police could legitimately search you and take a view about your intent.

    I’d seriously be rethinking my life choices if i got in that situation!

    i dont know anyone who carries a knife. i’ve never carried one. and have no need to carry one.

    I’ve carried one since i was about 13, so over 35 years. Either a small swiss army or opinel, or a larger (but still only small) fixed blade.
    I think i even have one in the glovebox of the car at the moment. Probably a Mora multipurpose thing.

    They get used “regularly”, couple of times a month i’ll have need for a knife.

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    UK Cops carry locking knives, usually leathermans.

    Ok, Not an everyday occurrence, but then these things never are. Ye olde scout motto comes into play “Be Prepared”

    Car you are in has an accident and is starting to burn, and you cant get your seat belt off, or you witness an accident with the same scenario.

    Choice, get knife from pocket cut yourself/them free. or burn to death.

    For my 2 nephews 16th birthdays i got them both a Swiss mini champ. Keyring sized, but always a sharp blade for whatever emergency use. My sister/mother both carry the Swiss card I got them years ago. Sister particularly says she loves the very handy small blade it comes with.

    I can’t imagine someone not having a small blade readily available for any emergency. Some on here appear to be totally useless.

    doomanic
    Full Member

    I have a retracting Stanley knife like this;

    3054F_P

    That I use pretty much every day at work. Consequently it lives in my trouser pocket during the day and I have occasionally forgotten to leave it at work. I’m not keen on getting caught with it by Dibble, it’s just not worth the bother.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Oh, and I have a team of 24 at work who regularly carry bushcraft knives into schools.

    We would never carry one in a pocket or on a belt. Why? There’s very little justification for doing so, every reason why a police officer could get awkward. Same for Gerber style multi tool things – great in a bag cycling, rather iffy in a pocket.

    We do carry them in a bag or toolbox of knives / peelers / lighters. In another box or bag. They are there for a purpose, and that purpose is clear.

    I carry a knife and occasionally a small hatchet when canoeing – but again it’s hidden in my buoyancy aid and clearly a rope knife, not some huge Crocodile Dundee style blade.

    Sandwich
    Full Member

    @Poopscoop I once carried one of these (in the early noughties)

    SAK_0_8573__S1

    onto a flight from Prestwich after a weekend winter climbing. One of the team had a 2″ bladed knife removed on the same flight, mine was at the bottom of my day pack and missed by security. I discovered it when un-packing at home the following day.

    franksinatra
    Full Member

    I could pop down to the harbour in town (kirkcudbright, Galloway) and if the boats are in find 40+ fishermen all with knives, or the 50 odd folk heading to work in the fish factory a few hundred yards away, they all will be carrying razor sharp knives whether they be queenie, scallop or fileting knives, strange how you are so very sure of yourself in proclaiming there’s no need.

    Silly argument. They all need a knife for their work. Which is entirely different to carrying a locking knife in your pocket everywhere in case you might need to slice a tomato in the office.

    doomanic
    Full Member

    Car you are in has an accident and is starting to burn, and you cant get your seat belt off,

    I have an escape hammer in the car for that very scenario. Admittedly not much good if I’m attempting to lose my eyebrows saving somebody else.

    phm-006_1024x1024@2x

    Cougar
    Full Member

    I carry a SAK, it lives in my bag (or as tits like to call it, a “man bag”).

    The problem with carrying something like an Opinel is that you’re relying on the police applying common sense. You would hope that if stopped they would discern between a middle-aged bloke carrying a pocket knife for feeding apples to horses and whittling boy scouts or something, and a behooded yoot going equipped. But it’s just that, hope, are you willing to hang your hat on the premise that you never get stopped by a copper who just found out that morning that his wife had been horizontal jogging with his best mate?

    Just get a legal carry. It’s a no-brainer really.

    Poopscoop
    Full Member

    Sandwich
    Full Member

    @Poopscoop
    I once carried one of these (in the early noughties)

    Christ, it’s a little worrying that it was missed, eh? How long ago was that?

    db
    Full Member

    I carry 2 constantly. Small SAK on my house keyring. (This comes with me on any flights as well.) Small SAK in my trouser pocket. Does not lock and blade is short enough I don’t need a reason to carry it!

    I also have lots of other knives I would not carry (unless I had a reason) as they lock or have a fixed blade.

    winston
    Free Member

    “How often do you need to knife when travelling to the office that it needs to be in your pocket?”

    Well I’m surprised about this. I’m always using a knife – If its not cutting up food its fixing stuff or bodging stuff. I often cycle to work offroad and stop halfway for a brew etc so I will use it for cheese, cake, opening packets etc. I’ve used it to help fix my bike on occasions. The other day I used it to cut a strap shorter on my wifes new rucksack as it was whipping her in the neck in the wind. I like to walk in the woods and sit down to whittle something every now and then. I kayak and do various watersports that require bits of string to be cut, surfboard leashes etc and its always more handy to have a general one in a jeans pocket then to think where did I put my specific knife for this specific task. I’ve always carried some kind of knife since I was a boy, its just a really useful tool to have on you. I prefer a lock knife like the Opinel as they are sharp, safe (to use), and cheap so not to worry if it gets lost – not that I’ve lost more than one.

    Once again it appears the onus is on the innocent to prove themselves so rather than on the law enforcement to make good quality value judgements – how did we ever get by in past decades I wonder. Still I don’t want to be a martyr and really don’t want a fine or worse so I’ll stop carrying it.

    I used to wander around the woods with a sheath knife when I was younger!

    So a small SAK it will be.

    stany
    Free Member

    I’ve carried a small kitchen knife with me most days for a few years now.

    I’ve a failed tooth implant front and centre and until it was removed late last year, have not been able to bite into an apple without fear of losing the tooth. So I started carrying a knife with a plastic guard over the blade in my lunch bag every day. I never carry the knife in my pocket or in carry on luggage (although I did once accidentally get a Leatherman through Heathrow security. They were more concerned about the cable ties I had)

    The only time I’ve been caught unawares was popping into the Guildhall museum with the kids when one needed a wee and my bag was scanned. Security seemed quite happy to look after my apple knife while I took the juniors to the loo .

    I’ve no reason to fear I’ll be stopped by the police for anything and wouldn’t be concerned if they spot checked me for anything, but I am aware of the fact that I carry a knife almost everywhere.

    monkeysfeet
    Free Member

    The law is simple here..

     You can carry a knife in public if it has a folding blade that is 3 inches (7.62cm) or less in length. However if any knife is used to threaten or intimidate it is considered an offensive weapon.

    Please note, lock knives are not classed as folding knives and are illegal to carry in public.

    If you get stopped and searched and end up going to court it’s down to you as an individual to give a reasonable excuse for carrying the knife.

    nickc
    Full Member

    strange how you are so very sure of yourself in proclaiming there’s no need.

    I work with people who use scalpels so sharp, they could cut bits off you without you noticing, those people would also be stupid to carry those things around with them in town a Saturday night, like your fishermen. If you need a knife for work, leave it there.

    Poopscoop
    Full Member

    Once again it appears the onus is on the innocent to prove themselves so rather than on the law enforcement to make good quality value judgements

    I’m fairness these days they are also social workers, marriage councillors and God knows what else. My son became a cop last year and I think it’s fair to say that “good quality value judgements” are easy in principle but not so easy in practice. The one time he assumes the middle aged guy with the knife is of no concern, that guy was heading back to his exes house to stab her.

    johnx2
    Free Member

    Call those knives?

    suburbanreuben
    Free Member

    I carry a 3″ opinel daily, and a 7″ saw, but I have good reason to, and I’m not going clubbing or to the footie.

    I’m a 60 year old Chap though and am unlikely to get stopped…

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    Getting a bit silly now.

    Nobody is suggesting people should be carrying retractable stanley knives,lockbacks, 8″ razor sharp filling or 14″ butchers steak knives, just a simple pocket knife for any task that might present itself. If you dont, then fine. Stand back when anyone asks ‘can you cut this’

    Maybe film them with your phone.

    Call those knives?

    Thats a **** toy mate.

    iu1u2l0fm1v11

    nickc
    Full Member

    Once again it appears the onus is on the innocent to prove themselves so rather than on the law enforcement to make good quality value judgements – how did we ever get by in past decades I wonder.

    Becasue young kids didn’t routinely carry ‘zombie knives’ that are longer than your forearm, around with them for the express intent of cut bits of each other with them, back in the 80’s, or if you did. the local cop would know your name most likely. Like having a few ales and driving home, or telling a ‘bird’ that her tits look nice in her top, things have changed, y’know?

    Olly
    Free Member

    Slightly off piste.

    Balisong’s, butterfly knives are pretty illegal in most places i guess because they are pretty unpleasent things used exclusivly for stabbing people.

    So where does the UK stand on what appears to effectively be a Butterfly Chisel?

    https://www.stanleytools.co.uk/product/fmht0-16145/stanley-fatmax-25-mm-pocket-chisel

    Are you ok, Stanley?

    SaxonRider
    Full Member

    Wait. So carrying a SAK is legal?!?

    My eldest was a Met officer, and told not to bother carrying mine. (I’ve carried a SAK with me since I was about 12. I’m 51. I’ve used it to cut tomatoes, spread peanut butter, cut cheese for sandwiches, whittle, cut dead branches for use as walking sticks for the kids… You name it.) Now I feel naked when I leave the house, as I no longer carry it.

    I’ve never had an Opinel, but I didn’t realise that a non-locking blade was legal.

    Phil_H
    Full Member

    It’s odd how much times change.

    As kids in a rural area most of us had bowie knives (talking 11,12,13 ish). Knives were for building dens and man-traps in the woods and playing chicken by throwing them between each others legs!

    It’s been a while since I played a game of knifey!

    cat69uk
    Free Member

    I cannot even remember when I last saw a policeman, other than at an airport. The chance of being actually stopped is slim to none, and to be searched?

    muddy@rseguy
    Full Member

    Not quite a knife but a true story: On a crowded tube train a few years back I felt something banging repeatedly into my back (no sniggering please) like a piece of wooden pipe (again, I said no sniggering…). On turning around to ask the person behind me if they would mind stopping hitting me I was faced with a slightly shorter person in sort of Ninja-ish gear (sort of dark clothing, mask etc.)  with his back to me. Very poker faced. I noted that he was carrying on his back a katana/shortsword in a bamboo sword sheath in a small backpack so it was sticking out of the top.

    Naturally I considered my options and decided that being british and saying”excuse me my good man, would you awfully mind not banging into me with your katana/short sword because its very rude” might not quite get the result I wanted. I’ve seen that scene in the Nightclub in Kill Bill part 1 and I guess, from others reactions, so had everyone else around me: It was the London Underground so obviously nobody else said anything and studously avoided all eye contact. Actually thinking back I dont think that there was anyone saying anything at all…Anyway, I got out at the next stop, which, as luck would have it actually was my stop. In spite of it being rush hour there were no staff around so I might have exited the station a tad faster than normal while comtemplating that the whole “See it, Say it, Sorted” idea has some practical limitations.

    PS I also have a phobia about Knives and Sharp Objects in general so I view my reaction to the above as being completely rational.

    Oh, and back on topic:I just checked my Topeak Alien Mk1 with its little folding blade thingy and its about 1in long but does lock in place along with the bottle opener, flathead screwdriver,  spanners and spoke keys, is that illegal to carry in my camelback?

    submarined
    Free Member

    I’m not convinced ‘I’m over 50 and have carried it my whole life’ would really stand up in court in a country that’s trying to address issues with knife crime.
    My best mate have me a lovely Leatherman as a best man gift. The only time I have it on me when out the house is when I’m on a big ride on the hills, nestled at the bottom of my pack next to the other bike tools and spares I carry with me.

    IMHO if you deliberately carry a knife with you as a matter of course thinking it’s no issue, you are likely to be either incredibly naive, incredibly arrogant, or a stabby gang type.

    Stand back when anyone asks ‘can you cut this’

    Unfortunately I left all my Alpha at the maternity ward, so I’ve never had to stand back while a Real Man did something with a knife.

    convert
    Full Member

    Oh, and back on topic:I just checked my Topeak Alien Mk1 with its little folding blade thingy and its about 1in long but does lock in place along with the bottle opener, flathead screwdriver, spanners and spoke keys, is that illegal to carry in my camelback?

    I’ve got one of these (in addition to my leatherman mentioned previously). It lives in my tiny saddlebag alongside emergency tube etc. My reading (happy to be proved wrong) is that the “with good reason”‘caveat covers me fine when I’m in a position when having a multi tool on a bike would be wise……like riding a bike. But not when in civvies at the pub.

    Though to be fair, if you ever managed to do someone harm with a stubby wide alien with all the other tools flapping about Id be very impressed!

    inbred853
    Full Member

    Well, I carry a knife pretty much everyday, under 3″ and non locking so within the current law. It’s got a blunt point so no use for stabbing as it would most likely fold in and slice my fingers if tried.

    It lives in my r/h trooser pocket and is used daily for opening boxes, packages, cutting rope/cord, slicing fruit, cheese etc, however wouldn’t take it to an event with loads of people around.

    As to why, well because I can and choose to and have done for most of my 55 years.

    blokeuptheroad
    Full Member

    This makes me sad.  Like others here, I grew up when getting your first pen knife as a kid was a right of passage.  It showed you were worthy of some trust and if you were found to be ****ing about with it, it would be taken off you. It was used for whittling, making dens, building camp fires in the wood. We all had them, no one thought it was unusual, no one ever stabbed anyone.

    I still use a knife almost every day, last week it was used to free a sheep which had become heavily entangled in brambles when out on a walk, yesterday to open a bag of chicken feed and this morning to sharpen a carpenters pencil when pottering with some wood work in the garage.  It often gets used in place of more appropriate tools which aren’t always to hand so it’s a screwdriver, tin opener, pencil sharpener, wire stripper, splinter remover as well as a knife. For most normal people, it is (or was) a completely unremarkable, innocent, useful thing to own and use.

    I no longer have one on me when I go out, other than hopping over the fence for a walk in the countryside which surrounds my gaff, because it’s just not worth it.

    UK knife law is ridiculous. It only affects the law abiding, it dumbs down and infantilises us, it slowly and surely erodes a small aspect of personal freedom and it does nothing – absolutely nothing to stop knife crime. It’s enacted by cynical politicians to appease the pearl clutchers and red tops knowing fine well that the scrotes it’s aimed at will completely ignore it.  Tackling the deprivation, inequality, poverty and other social issues which cause violent crime is far harder, so better to enact another meaningless piece of legislation to be seen to be doing something. The extra controls on lock knives are particular stupid, as a locking knife blade is a safety feature designed to prevent injury.

    I’m 60 in a few weeks and have seen this happen gradually over my lifetime.  Maybe if you’re a lot younger it all seems normal and you don’t realise some of the freedom, innocence and trust which has been lost for no benefit, and how legislators and politicians increasingly treat us all as children.  I’m mostly fairly progressive in my attitudes and not one normally to bleat about the Nanny State, but this is one area when I think it absolutely is the case.

    BoardinBob
    Full Member

    Car you are in has an accident and is starting to burn, and you cant get your seat belt off, or you witness an accident with the same scenario.

    Are you Batman?

    franciscobegbie
    Free Member

    I once had a wee credit card multi tool thing all but forgotten about in my wallet – one of these: https://www.swiss-store.co.uk/victorinox-swisscard-lite-pocket-tool

    On a work trip back from Germany, the xray staff at Frankfurt were having a right good look at something in my belongings that I’d put through on the tray. They summoned me over, and as soon as I saw what they were looking at, I knew what it was. Or so I thought. They weren’t interested in the knife or scissors in it, they were looking at the tiny screwdriver thing, as on the xray, it looked like a 10p sized shuriken.
    Bearing in mind, I’d already travelled out with the same thing in my wallet via Glasgow, Schiphol and Frankfurt.

    submarined
    Free Member

    I don’t think anyone is saying don’t carry a knife at home/in the garden, keep your Leatherman in a gun safe etc. nobody needs to mistily eyed opine the loss of childhood. My 10 year old will at some point likely be having a small knife to use at home for many of the things suggested above (den building, doing things with sticks, making bows and arrows etc) but at the same time, his Xbox privileges were recently revoked after discovering that he was carrying a pencil sharpener blade around in his school bag out of magpie fascination (and then not telling the truth to us about it.) So that ‘some point’ is now further away than it was 2 weeks ago.

    dissonance
    Full Member

    Becasue young kids didn’t routinely carry ‘zombie knives’ that are longer than your forearm, around with them for the express intent of cut bits of each other with them, back in the 80’s

    I am not sure that holds up with the teddie boys etc. Whilst a bit before my time the creation of the offensive weapons laws in the 50s show a previous response to knife crime.
    I remember visiting some cousins in inner manchester and one of them carrying a knife for “self defence” or possibly to try and impress the country yokel. Since it was a cheese knife it failed to do so.
    The laws have got simpler and more focussed probably due to the looser ones not solving a pretty unsolvable problem.
    The ban on locking knifes is an odd one. Its not obvious parliament were trying to ban them since the law just states that folding knifes under 3inches were legal but the courts decided that didnt include folding lock knives.

    There is always a degree of public outrage/media stoking in these laws. Hence why in the US you have bowie knives specifically banned in some areas and others were you cant carry a butterfly knife but can carry a sword or a concealed pistol.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    Wait. So carrying a SAK is legal?!?

    Yes.

    I’ve never had an Opinel, but I didn’t realise that a non-locking blade was legal.

    The legislation prohibits fixed blade knives with a blade over three inches. Locking knives are illegal en passant because it was established in a test case that the locks effectively convert them into a fixed blade.

    Sub 3″ non-locking blades are perfectly legal carry. Anything else requires justification.

    Carrying a chef’s knife in the boot of your car from a restaurant kitchen to a professional knife sharpener is fine, having it in your inside pocket on your way to the Ferret And Trombone not so much.

    I like many have fallen foul of the airport security, mine was the TSA in San Diego, had a CRKT M16 in my daysack returning from a detachment, thankfully they were understanding once my boss vouched for me and allowed me to put it in my hand luggage, I did get a bollocking and extras on return to Blighty though for being a nugget.

    That and a leatherman (with a very dull blade) have been the only tools I ever carried, the CRKT got put in an amnesty bin when I found it after leaving and sorting through my kit. Never felt the need to replace it with anything to be fair, could probably do with a SAK or replacing the Leatherman that is somewhere in one of the many gorilla boxes in the garage along with some musty other kit no doubt.

    The Leatherman was far more practical, the CRKT mostly opened morale parcels and rations packs. 😂

    Cougar
    Full Member

    he was carrying a pencil sharpener blade around in his school bag out of magpie fascination

    Huh?

    johnx2
    Free Member

    Going shanked in case you need to slice an apple? Who on earth needs to slice apples at work? Or tomatoes. Don’t say chefs. I find biting does the job. Equally I don’t stop to brew up en route as it’d a). get me funny looks on the train and b). I can manage an hour without a brew. Just. (And for the very very occasional off road commute the usual multitool works sans knife, and I can replace someone’s chain link if shit gets real.) And if you have a brew on work’s time they’re paying you.

    It was used for whittling, making dens, building camp fires in the wood. We all had them,

    boys love knives. As is evident from this thread.

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