Canyon K.I.S. self-centring steering doohicky

by 65

K.I.S. (Keep It Stable) uses springs, ultra-strong polymer fibre bands and a precisely shaped cam ring hidden inside the frame to actively centre your bars whilst riding.

What’s inside. The unique layout of pre-tensioned springs, polymer fibre bands and a precisely shaped cam ring create a new chapter for steering dynamics.
Canyon’s first bike equipped with Keep It Stable technology- the Spectral CF 8 K.I.S.
The strength of the system is adjusted to suit rider and terrain.
The rest of the Spectral family has been updated alongside the launch of K.I.S.- including a new colourway and spec for the flagship Spectral CFR.

Press Release in full:

Canyon Presents the Spectral CF 8 K.I.S. AN Evolution IN Steering Dynamics

KOBLENZ, OCTOBER 21, 2022 | Keep It Stable (K.I.S.) is an innovative, all-new steering stabilising technology that raises the bike handling bar to the next level.

Bold claim? Absolutely.

Invented by Jo Klieber at Syntace and engineered by Canyon into the trail ripping Spectral CF 8, K.I.S. is a simple but ingenious technology that uses custom springs, ultra-strong polymer fibre bands, and a precisely shaped cam ring hidden inside the frame to actively centre your bars while riding. Unlike steering stabilisers of the past, K.I.S does not rely on friction, it creates a perfectly tuned centring force to make riding trails smoother, faster, and more controlled.

To understand why, you only have to look at the self-centring control systems used on many other vehicles. Cars, boats and even planes have controls which self-centre. When it comes to bikes, the addition of a central reference point and counter force when steering offers clear benefits to almost every aspect of riding. From increasing stability at any speed and more predictable handling to filtering out front wheel deflections and reducing rider fatigue, K.I.S even helps to control drifts and minimise understeer. When the trail heads back uphill the system keeps on giving, making climbing more efficient by actively combating wheel flop, reducing the power surges required from the rider to maintain balance.

Fully integrated inside the frame, K.I.S. adds a measly 110g of weight to the mainframe and the only difference you will see on the bike is the adjustment slider on the top tube. From here the tension of the system can be adjusted to suit the rider’s size, weight, style, and local terrain.

Manufactured from high strength materials and protected inside the frame, the system is also maintenance free: there is no need to grease, clean, or replace any moving parts. What’s more, the built-in rotation stop prevents the system from over-extending or breaking in the event of a crash.Hold your line through rough sections, maintain composure at high speeds, and climb more efficiently. Thanks to K.I.S. bike handling has truly turned a corner.

Canyon, together with Liteville (part of the Syntace family) are the exclusive brands to bring this new technology to the market. . For Canyon, the Spectral CF 8 K.I.S will be the debut model equipped with the system. Perfectly balancing performance and value, the bike features Fox’s benchmark Performance Elite suspension, trusted Deore XT transmission and brakes from Shimano and reliable XM1700 wheels from DT Swiss, wrapped in grippy Maxxis rubber. As well as introducing K.I.S., there are also updates to the rest of the Spectral range for 2023, including an all-new colour and spec for the flagship Spectral CFR.

canyon.com/keep-it-stable

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Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 65 total)
  • Canyon K.I.S. self-centring steering doohicky
  • weeksy
    Full Member

    So basically a MTB version of a steering damper… wow…

    RobHilton
    Free Member

    How will this affect my tail whips?

    vinnyeh
    Full Member

    So basically a MTB version of a steering damper… wow…

    That was my first thought, but it doesn’t seem to be, just for centering the steering rather than preventing tank-slappers . No damper, other than the opposing spring. What a bizarre product.

    ads678
    Full Member

    I can ride no handed better on my gravel and road bike than on my MTB. I asume this is for people who have the same issue?…

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    I’ve never been able to ride no handies, no balance. But to get this tech does it mean you need to buy a whole new frame

     

    Good for Canyon, maybe not for the average riders bank balance.

    julians
    Free Member

    Gut reaction is that this is a solution to a problem that doesnt exist, but willing to be proven wrong, would like a go on one to see what its like.

    andybrad
    Full Member

    why?

    HoratioHufnagel
    Free Member

    Looks like an integrated deflopilator to me!

    Yuba Accessories: Deflopilator

    monkeyboyjc
    Full Member

    Even the brief first try reviews seem to be confused – requires a complete rethink on how you ride your bike etc. No one’s really slagging it off, but no high praises either from what I’ve seen.

    Good to see canyon again, aren’t scared of trying something ‘new’ and putting it to the public though, but my guess (internet armchair) is it’ll disappear from the range within 2 years.

    ayjaydoubleyou
    Full Member

    I would hope that it adds the stability (and confidence) of a slacker head angle without the long wheelbase and wheel flop that come with it conventionally?

    Maybe. I don’t understand 2 wheeled dynamics enough to be sure, I struggle enough with trail.

    ads678
    Full Member

    Slightly off topic, but does any actually use flip chips? I have one on my Reactor but can’t ever imagine a time I’d be bothered to use it.

    My son has a Canyon Strive with the shapeshifter, which does seem to work, but I know they’ve been problematic for lots of people.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    I’m not convinced, riding a bike no-handed isn’t down to the front wheel staying pointing ahead, it’s because when the bike starts to fall over, the steering geometry self corrects. It leans left, the wheel turns left harder, centripetal force pushes the bike back upright and probably over center, and the process repeats to the right.

    Real world example most people will have tried at some point, riding on skinny woodwork, it’s hard because you can only balance by adjusting your COG manually side to side which is really unnatural.

    So this makes sense,

    Even the brief first try reviews seem to be confused – requires a complete rethink on how you ride your bike etc.

    It’s not making you more stable, it’s stopping the bars from turning, and it’s the bars turning which usually provides stability.

    robertajobb
    Full Member

    I’m sure I once had a foooked headset that provided the same function.

    Blackflag
    Free Member

    Ive never ever been on my bike and wished the steering would do anything other than what my weight or hands told it to.

    mtbfix
    Full Member

    Headset bottom bearing = 3 hour job?

    AlexSimon
    Full Member

    I have a lot of respect for Liteville/Syntace (certainly more than Canyon) so I will be interested to see how this goes.

    dirkpitt74
    Full Member

    What happens if I change forks on a bike with integrated deflopilator equipped bike?

    Also does anyone actually have an issue with floppy feeling steering?

    NewRetroTom
    Full Member

    I love the fact that they called it KIS.
    Keep It Simple Stupid – don’t add unnecessary complexity to anything! That includes springs that are trying to straighten out your steering.
    Has anyone had a go at seeing it would feel like by attaching a bungees to your seatpost and putting one to each side of your handlebars?

    footflaps
    Full Member

    A friend had a bolt on steering damper solution on his MTB more than 10 years ago, he seemed to like it…..

    IHN
    Full Member

    Has anyone had a go at seeing it would feel like by attaching a bungees to your seatpost and putting one to each side of your handlebars?

    No, but as a kid I had a go at seeing what it would feel like if I swapped my hands over on the handlebars. That ended quickly, and not well…

    Speeder
    Full Member

    thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member
    I’m not convinced, riding a bike no-handed isn’t down to the front wheel staying pointing ahead, it’s because when the bike starts to fall over, the steering geometry self corrects. It leans left, the wheel turns left harder, centripetal force pushes the bike back upright and probably over centre, and the process repeats to the right.

    I reckon this device would put an end to no hand riding as the KIS will overpower the self-centring action that trail provides and thus mean you’re on the floor before you know it.

    I love no handers and For that reason I’m out.

    bigdaddy
    Full Member

    I just want to acknowledge the amazing name Deflopilator! never heard that before and it’s a brilliant word!

    devash
    Free Member

    A solution in need of a problem if there ever was one.

    File alongside headset cable routing in the “Thanks but no thanks” folder.

    monkeysfeet
    Free Member

    @Horatio. Does that work on us guys? Asking for a friend…..

    Blackflag
    Free Member

    On the plus side, it will be easier to lean your bike against your car without it falling over when you slam the boot closed.

    sirromj
    Free Member

    I just want to quote most of the replies so far and write this beneath them.

    comet
    Full Member

    Have you broken the April 1st press embargo on this story?

    funkmasterp
    Full Member

    Ive never ever been on my bike and wished the steering would do anything other than what my weight or hands told it to.

    I was going to type this. No idea what the thing is actually for.

    seriousrikk
    Full Member

    Feels a lot like this is a solution looking for a problem to solve.

    I’m not an especially skilled rider, and I don’t have an especially slack bike, but where I lack skills I still cannot see how a spring loaded steerer would improve my riding. Or indeed my chances of remaining on the bike when my aspirations exceed my ability.

    singlespeedstu
    Full Member

    A mate had a Hopey steering damper BITD.
    It was very difficult to ride no handed with it.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    The only possible benefit I can think of is to damp the natural tendency of the wheel to flick left and right when climbing very feebly on steep stuff and take you off your desired line. Can’t say that’s a massive selling point for me, the zig-zagging gives me a rest.

    the00
    Free Member

    I’ve had a few hours to think about this… I imagine that in terms of ride it will feel at most times like a bike with more trail, that is a bike with a shorter offset fork, but without the wheel flop issues.
    This will not be true when riding not hands.

    jameso
    Full Member

    Odd that there’s no damper, agreed.

    There’s a few few e-scooters using steering dampers now. I tried one and thought it was very effective. But there imho it’s a bandage on a fundamentally flawed steering geometry dictated by packaging and small wheels. A good bandage though since the packaging isn’t easy to resolve differently.
    The classic touring or cargo bike spring as an antidote to wheel flop always interested me. It could allow you to remove all of the positive feedback the geometry/flop has in the steering feel (I think we need some of that positive feedback and it’s part of why I dislike low trail geometries that aim to remove all flop) or it could help neutralise excessive flop, whatever you think excessive is. It’d need to be tuneable to suit preferences.

    I’m not convinced, riding a bike no-handed isn’t down to the front wheel staying pointing ahead, it’s because when the bike starts to fall over, the steering geometry self corrects. It leans left, the wheel turns left harder, centripetal force pushes the bike back upright and probably over center, and the process repeats to the right.

    Try relying on that riding no hands, you’ll crash : ) Bikes don’t really self-correct, they just self-‘reduce the error to a point’. But then they fall over.

    Riding a bike no-handed is about moving your weight from one side to the other to turn the f wheel and stay in balance, just like riding with hands. You just steer from the hips and shift your weight via the saddle to initiate the turn rather than actually moving the bars yourself. Much harder to correct on a floppy / long-trail bike than a short trail bike.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    What happens if I change forks on a bike with integrated deflopilator equipped bike?

    I’m guessing it’s built into a headset component somehow, like a steerer spacer that extends through the bearing? So dropping the forks out would be relatively simple?

    A mate had a Hopey steering damper BITD.
    It was very difficult to ride no handed with it.

    I still think it’s not a damper. but the problem trying to ride no handed would be the same.

    A damper holds the wheel straight when you get pinged by a rock at speed which might be enough to knacker your wrist in a 4×4. Or to dampen oscillations on motorbike, all bikes oscillate, it’s mostly how they stay upright, but a 200kg motorbike is harder to control them than a 10kg MTB if they build up rather than dampen down.

    I imagine that in terms of ride it will feel at most times like a bike with more trail, that is a bike with a shorter offset fork, but without the wheel flop issues.

    That’s what I was thinking. In my mind it’s not a problem that needs solving, but it could be the innovation that allows something else (either zero offset forks, or massive offset I couldn’t quite decide). This + more inherent ‘flop’ probably allows some other part of the geometry to be changed for the better which would be the real reason to do it.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    Odyssey made a steering damper back in the Eighties which I am fairly sure was in the Freewheel catalogue and brought in by Madison. As I recall, it never found a market. I’d be happy to test one just to see whether it delivers on its claims but I am suspicious that is solving a problem that doesn’t really exist.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    jameso
    Full Member

    I’m guessing it’s built into a headset component somehow, like a steerer spacer that extends through the bearing?

    Clamp-on section on the steerer, under the upper bearing?

    Deflopilators (great name) and the like usually are just a spring that connects a bolt in the fork crown where a guard bracket would go, and an anchor point under the down tube. If you have a bike with a crudcatchcher boss on the DT and a trad type of fork crown you could fit one, or make something similar.
    This one has a band-on fitting
    boing

    stevextc
    Free Member

    My son has a Canyon Strive with the shapeshifter, which does seem to work, but I know they’ve been problematic for lots of people.

    Not a problem just drop into your local Canyon dealer …. oh.

    It’s not making you more stable, it’s stopping the bars from turning, and it’s the bars turning which usually provides stability.

    Exactly this…

    vlad_the_invader
    Free Member

    No riding impressions from the mag seems to indicate STW were not invited out to the press launch? Weird? Or maybe they are still writing up an article…

    Anyway, a fairly decent write up on NSMB.com (invited out from BC to France for the press launch!) but they are reporting this as a €400 option. Ouch!

    I’m not in the market for a new bike currently but I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t be splurging €400 extra on any bike just for this (and certainly not without a proper back-to-back test ride).

    Canyon/Liteville have a one year exclusivity deal but it can be licensed by other manufacturers after that deal expires, so expect more bikes to have in future (unless it flops*, of course)

    *Boom boom

    malv173
    Full Member

    unless it flops

    If it does, I reckon it’ll spring right back.

    Ba dum tiss!

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 65 total)

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