Video: Return To The Rockies

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The Rocky Mountain Slayer has returned for 2017 and to mark the occasion Rocky Mountain has put together a sweet feature with added video goodness. Enjoy…

(Can’t see the video? Click here)

Words by Brian Park

Photography by Paris Gore

Riding by Thomas Vanderham and Florian Nicolai

The iconic peaks of the Rocky Mountains embody a particular wildness, a disdain for the manicured and curated experiences of the modern world. Rocky Mountain Bicycles’ namesake mountain range holds a special place in our heart. We knew this year that we were overdue for a return to our roots—our bedrock.

rocky mountainGrowing up in Edmonton, the Rockies represented the epitome of rugged, large scale terrain. My trips to the Rockies have been few and far between since I left the prairies, so the opportunity to spend time in Fernie on the new Slayer was one I looked forward to all year. It did not disappoint—panoramic views, huge descents, impeccable trail building, and a tight knit mountain bike community.

“This was my first time riding with Florian Nicolaï, and it’s easy to see what makes him one of the top EWS racers in the world. He’s got natural speed and an eye for ultra creative lines on the trail. We had an incredible time, and I hope that my next trip back to the Rockies isn’t too far away.” —Thomas Vanderham.

rocky 3Elk Valley locals tell a story about William Fernie, who asked a Ktunaxa chief about the black coal rocks hanging on the necklace of the chief’s daughter. The chief showed him the source of the coal on the condition that Mr. Fernie marry his daughter, but the prospector backed out of the agreement. The chief then cursed the entire valley, and it would suffer a series of fires, floods, and mining disasters at the turn of the century. The supposed curse was lifted by Chief Ambrose Gravelle of the Ktunaxa Nation on August 15th, 1964. However, if you look at Mount Hosmer on summer evenings, you can sometimes make out a shadow of the chief’s daughter standing beside the “ghost rider” on his horse.

I was in a window seat, jetting west across the mountains of British Columbia. I stared out at the grandeur of sun tinted snowy crags and knew that what separated my adopted home in Edmonton from the native soil of Vancouver was a massive rock formation called the Rocky Mountains. I thought about naming our new company after these peaks.” — Grayson Bain, one of the original founders of Rocky Mountain Bicycles, 1981.

rocky mountainThe jagged summits of the Three Sisters peaks that overlook the Elk Valley are massive beds of sloping marine limestone, called the Palliser Formation. Most mountains are younger than what they’re built on, but Fernie’s craggy peaks are literally upside down. 360 million years ago the area that would become the Elk Valley was much further south, close to the equator, and the Pacific Ocean was only 80km to the west. Dinosaurs roamed the land and earthquakes shook as the tectonic plates smashed into each other, fracturing massive pieces of stone along huge thrust faults. 180 million years ago, the old limestone sea floor was pushed upwards along those thrust faults and over the younger stone—turning the mountains upside down.

I was excited to have the opportunity to work on this project. The first day I couldn’t believe I was riding with Thomas Vanderham—he’s a legend to me and I love watching his signature style and whips! This was the first time I rode the finished product of the Slayer, but it only took me one run to get used to it. It surprised me how good it is for different trails and terrain.

“The trails in the Rockies are so different from France, or anywhere else I’ve ridden on the Enduro World Series. The day we rode in the alpine was special. Riding raw freeride trails with Thomas right behind gave me a little pressure, but the views were beautiful and it was so much fun. It was an amazing experience and I hope to return one day soon!” —Florian Nicolaï.

rocky moihtainThe scale of the Rockies is sobering. From geological upheavals, to megatons of rock carving the landscape as glaciers advanced and retreated, the forces that have shaped these mountains are almost unimaginable. This place has a unique way of making humans feel insignificant, and reminding us that today’s landscape is just an impermanent snapshot in the earth’s geological history. It’s an honour to explore this terrain, its stone and loam, on two wheels.

rockyMore on the new Rocky Slayer here.

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