New to singlespeeding.

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  • New to singlespeeding.
  • Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    Built this up to have a go at singlespeeding, enjoying it so far. It has certainly added an extra dimension to the local loop.

    But I really liked going back to the geared bike !

    watsontony
    Member

    my advise is buy some gears! or get rigid forks either really

    Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    Yes already planning on getting some rigid forks, it will drop some weight and I can then build up another frame I have lying around, with the ones on the On One.

    Premier Icon Teetosugars
    Subscriber

    watsontony – Member
    my advise is buy some gears! or get rigid forks either really

    Why rigid forks?

    I never understood that.. Just cos its a Singlespeed you’re meant to run it rigid? 😕

    Just cos its a Singlespeed you’re meant to run it rigid?

    Premier Icon p7rich
    Subscriber

    Nice choice. My Whippet (carbon Inbred) is a wonderful SS bike. Enjoy.

    (PS. No plans to sacrifice my 100mm SIDs (or wrists) for rigid forks)

    Premier Icon mattjg
    Subscriber

    I never understood that.. Just cos its a Singlespeed you’re meant to run it rigid?

    No fork squish when standing up to put some power out. Depends where you ride of course.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    I’ve got one of them – great fun especially in this weather, saving time on maintenance and spending it instead on time in the bath warming up cold toes!

    I ran mine rigid for 6 or 8 rides but I had a broken wrist a few years back and it was starting to gip me on longer rides / bigger bumps. But it was fun and ‘involving’ as an experience! In fact, I will be advertising the on-one carbon forks later this week, if interested. Haven’t done photos yet but they’re these ones http://www.on-one.co.uk/i/q/FOOOCAR/on_one_carbon_fork and I’ll be looking for about £100 vs £150 new.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    No fork squish when standing up to put some power out.

    This too – if going the suspension route, a lock out is very useful.

    Premier Icon mattjg
    Subscriber

    My frame came with rigid forks so I put them on to get it on the dirt ASAP. I find in a typical XC ride of say 15 miles I miss squishy forks for about 100 metres – not enough to make worth buying them and carting them around all over.

    That may change in the summer when the surfaces are firmer, but rigid was OK in the frost too.

    I also think if there’s a bike to built as light as possible, it’s the SS.

    Premier Icon Teetosugars
    Subscriber

    No fork squish when standing up to put some power out. Depends where you ride of course.

    Is this not the case on any Hardtail then??

    Premier Icon righog
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    The build took a bit longer and cost a bit more than expected. It was planned as a straight component swap from a Boardman to the one one. But I ended up having to replace the brakes and the cranks as they both seemed OK on the Boardman but the move was too much for them and neither wanted to work properly on the On One.

    I also played about with the back wheel a bit before I could get it to work. First trying a single chain tug then one on each side, but even with two chain tugs it was still pulling the wheel to the drive side ( this was before changing the cranks and BB) and ended up getting a solid threaded axle fitted which has not moved.

    As for the forks it was always the intention to run it rigid at some point as it was built primarily for the local disused railway tracks. I also planned to rebuild the Boardman as it got loaned out to friends lot.

    So Far I have done about five rides and it has done more or less what I wanted from it, it has made the local easy loop a little more challenging and already I can feel my legs getting stronger. Hats off to people who ride them fully off road ( maybe do it as I get stronger ?)

    Premier Icon chrispo
    Subscriber

    I did my first race on a singlespeed yesterday and I think I’m going to die

    Very different to singlespeeding for training or fun

    Is this not the case on any Hardtail then??

    Yes and no, In a way.

    Charging up hill on a SS is a lot easier with out your front end bouncing about.

    Yes this will happen on a geared bike, But 9 times of ten the geared rider will be in a far easier gear and less reliant on the fork.

    66.6% of it is fashion.

    I personally only ride rigid for efficiency, I appreciate it makes me slower on the decent but it evens out all the way round a ride. But I hate hard tails. Either Full sus or fully rigid for me I think the bike feels more balanced.

    zestystyle
    Member

    I prefer a fork tbh, I ride SS a little bit, I think if the terrain is techy then a fork helps out a bit, tends to be a bit more forgiving in my wrists too. The best thing about ss is that you’re forced to get on with it, great for winter riding. What gear do you run?

    Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    What gear do you run?

    Went for 32/16 which seems about right. Not sure if I ever use this gear on my other geared bikes, it’s a bit too hard on the up’s and not quite fast enough on the downs..I guess that’s one of the compromises. I also bought an 18 sprocket, ( but not needed it yet)

    Give the 18 ago, you’ll prob find 17 is about right.

    But your never going to have the perfect gear for all the trail. A couple of months you’ll be stronger and be fine to go back to 16 or feel happy on a 17/18 for the ups and you’ll become better at carrying your speed on the descents and flats.

    Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    Thanks Shep, yes may as well try the 18.

    and a question for you do you only singlespeed ? and if so why, I got a real buzz going back to gears after a few single speed rides.

    Premier Icon mattjg
    Subscriber

    the ‘standard’ gearing is 32:16 on a 26er or 32:18 on a 29er, it works for me in the Surrey Hills and I cleaned the course at Brass Monkeys yesterday on it.

    someone said to me the other day “yeah but geared bikes are never in the right gear either”.

    I got a real buzz going back to gears after a few single speed rides.

    I’ve SSd exclusively for 6 months. I put gears on my 29er for a tryout, it was boring and I found I sat in 32:18 most of the time anyway. I don’t care about spinning out occasionally and I don’t care about the odd short push.

    It depends where you ride though, I’m sure if I was in Scotland, Wales or the Lakes I’d want some gears!

    and a question for you do you only singlespeed ? and if so why, I got a real buzz going back to gears after a few single speed rides.

    At the moment yes, but i’m looking to get a nice 150mmish trail bike at some point. I’d still use the singlespeed a lot more though. But I do fancy something to take up to Fort William or the alps.

    I love singlespeed. The simplicity of it. My main bike for 8 years has always been a SS bike (dif ones) I live on the edge of the North Yorkshire Moors and it serves me right. I did it at first for cost on an old cannondale and never really looked back as after a few months I could keep up with all the guys I ride with.

    Like i said above the only problem I have now is being slower on tech descents (or ups if someone stops in front of me, as its a ballache to get going again) but thats because i’m riding a rigid with a bunch of guys on FS trail bikes. 🙂

    zestystyle
    Member

    I ride in North Wales (Llangollen,Berwyns, Clwyds etc) I ran a 16t for a bit but found it too hard on my knees, I run an 18t now, can climb most things with a bit of ooomph. I’d be open to a 21t for really horrible boggy riding, can be really tiring to force gear in the mud sometimes – bit spinnier gear would help.

    Clipping in will also help HUGELY 😉

    Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    So Far for me single speeding has been solitary, and the usual group of people I ride with laughing quite a bit. There is no way I could keep up on the weekly ride especially on the downs and the 140 full suss is the order of the day.

    Shep I started my riding in the early 90’s around Guisborough that was all ridgid but my bones had more flex then. I have since moved a bit further North.

    Zesty I have just changed from clipped in to flats on all my bikes. But was thinking of clipped for the SS if only to use the pedals and shoes I have, So I will get the old SPD’s back on soon.

    sheephills
    Member

    Rode ss all summer , mainly solo missions.
    When ridning with Work mates i use my geared.
    Cant Wait till spring to ride one gear only, very satisfying.

    Ss = Always spds

    Premier Icon mattjg
    Subscriber

    SPDs are handy as they keep your foot on the pedal on the upstroke when it’s tough.

    zestystyle
    Member

    I’m lucky because all of my friends have SS, we have a weekly night ride on a wednesday where we all ride SS on the same 32-18 gear, then we all have 140-150mm bouncers as well. more and more though I seem to be grabbing the SS. Thinking of building an el Mariachi up SS. Try wagon wheels…..

    thefaller
    Member

    Single speed clipped in.

    No problem keeping up my mates.

    Kick arse on climb and lay off brakes on the downs.

    Run 38 19 and can get up most stuff the guy with gears do.

    If i get off normally and walk last bit and still there first.

    If not just run to stay in front.

    zestystyle
    Member

    Run 38 19 and can get up most stuff the guy with gears do.

    how come 38 chainring?

    Premier Icon mattjg
    Subscriber

    If i get off normally and walk last bit and still there first.

    Did a race yesterday, passed loads of gearies faffing about spinning up the climbs, they say “well done” which is nice but I always think “you’ve got the same gear so have a go too”.

    Another time the course had climbs where everyone pushed. I’m used to it so usually took a few places on them!

    jezandu
    Member

    I’m not sure where the rigid forks on SS comes from. Maybe it is all to with simplicity but I just love their point and shoot feel to them.

    I love racing SS, its much more fun and laid back. If you do well you can be smug if you’re at the back you can use it as an excuse. I don’t think it slowed me down that much in all honesty.

    Hope you continue to enjoy it!

    sfinnie
    Member

    Built a rigid ss 29er autumn past – Singular Swift – referred to by my biking buds as ” the mid life crisis bike” 🙂

    I live 10mins from Glentress so plenty of hills. Had it 32×18 originally but that was a bit nippy so now running 32×20. Climbs really well – notably faster than my FS. It’s fine on smoothish downs too, but rattles the fillings a bit on bumpier stuff. Had it down Caddon Bank at Inners last week, can’t say it was enjoyable… Mind you rest of the xc trail was fine.

    So prefer FS on bumpy stuff. But when I go into the garage it’s the ss I want to ride. Must be my age 8)

    Premier Icon Teetosugars
    Subscriber

    I do love my SS… And lucky enough to have a fork with an easy lockout…

    Win, win… 8)

    thefaller
    Member

    Zesty

    Run a 38 19 so there are more teeth gripping the chain as i try never getting off and put loads of pressure on chain.

    When climb and come to a stand still i try and keep balance then get going again.

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