Which americanisms would you like to see erased from the english language?

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  • Which americanisms would you like to see erased from the english language?
  • spursn17
    Member

    Elevator
    Sidewalk
    License plate (number plate, it’s a f******* number plate in this country!)
    Power outage

    When No2 son kept using americanisms (Microsoft English, offer the option of English English you computer programming fools!) I said if he didn’t stop I would pay his pocket money in dollars, took him a while to realise that $20 isn’t the same as Β£20 πŸ˜†

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
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    Or we could beat people who use americanisms until they stop doing so.

    vickypea
    Member

    Anything that uses an unnecessary number of syllables.
    ……”Momentarily” meaning “soon”, or “at this time” meaning “now”

    redstripe
    Member

    cookies

    I like Bill Bryson’s use of language though but he’s an honoury Brit now. He does make the point that a lot of the American language is old English with the way it is written and said

    jruk
    Member

    “reach out” / “out reach to” – you mean email or call?

    “curate a list” – you mean write a list?

    “touch base” – you mean talk to?

    “27.5” – you mean marketing fodder?

    Just **** off and don’t come back until you can make proper beer.

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    until you can make proper beer

    Some of the finest beers being currently brewed by UK independents are analogs of American Pale Ales. And they’re lovely.

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
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    Why suddenly start using a phrase from a different language and culture?

    I only said I liked that phrase, didn’t say I used it!

    Anyhow, it’s evolution of language isn’t it? Not too long ago we were just grunting in different pitches to communicate.

    crikey
    Member

    The way to fight against the Ameriglobalization of what used to be English is to promote the use of dialect to maintain ones cultural heritage and sustain the local identities which characterise this green and pleasant land.

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    Anyhow, it’s evolution of language isn’t it? Not too long ago we were just grunting in different pitches to communicate.

    I fairly sure we didn’t go from grunting in different pitches to speaking English.

    Premier Icon muddy@rseguy
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    We’ll bearing in mind English is a mongrel language with roots based in Latin,, a wide variety of Celtic languages, French, old German, Norse and a whole lot more I fail to see what’s the problem with more input from elsewhere.

    Languages evolve over time as populations move around. Nowadays there is so much information movement that all langauges are evolving and changing.

    ….sorry, too pedantic? ( by the way, the English word pedant is from the French word pedant (accent on the e) and is itself based on the Italian word pedante which actually means “teacher” and that itself has a Latin and then a Greek basis…etc etc.)

    Ok Then I would go for “Hello” as it’s a made up word and banning it for being an Americanism would be a laugh as we would all have to say “Ahoyhoy” as a greeting on the phone as Alexander Graham Bell intended πŸ˜‰

    jruk
    Member

    “analogs of” – you mean similar to or inspired by πŸ™‚

    Anyway, us Brits invented Pale Ale (along with most of the stuff that’s worth having).

    bokonon
    Member

    Anything spelled with a zee

    The obsession with removing the letter “z” from words which should, by their etymology, contain one is a peculiar trait of poorly educated English people – if anything, the so called “American” spellings are the more traditional, with the “s” spellings being the upstart interlopers. A quick look through the OED will tell you that the -ize spellings are often the older, for example, the earliest record of “organize” is 1425 – before America was even discovered and “realise” dates back to 1611, with “realise” not appearing until over a century later in 1755.

    There are a small number of words where the -ize ending is not used, because that section of the word comes from a different root word, rather than being a verb ending – e.g. always promise, because it comes from “mise” meaning sending – but these are the exception, not the rule – the idea that the rule should be one way or another (i.e. all z’s or no z’s) is seriously misinformed.

    bokonon
    Member

    “analogs of” – you mean similar to or inspired by

    Surely the problem is not using the word analogue correctly, it’s spelling it incorrectly.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
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    bearnecessities – Member

    Anyhow, it’s evolution of language isn’t it?
    Not really, no.

    The replacement of perfectly good, commonly used words and phrases by americanisms is not evolution.
    It’s more of a surrender. Or a betrayal. πŸ˜€

    muddy@rseguy – Member

    We’ll bearing in mind English is a mongrel language with roots based in Latin,, a wide variety of Celtic languages, French, old German, Norse and a whole lot more I fail to see what’s the problem with more input from elsewhere.

    It’s not ‘more input’.
    British English is being replaced, not added to.

    vickypea
    Member

    Or did they mean pronouncing z as “zee” rather than “zed”?

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    “analogs of” – you mean similar to or inspired by

    Well done. You understood me. Even though, that wasn’t quite what I meant, but anyway, moving on…

    Anyway, us Brits invented Pale Ale (along with most of the stuff that’s worth having).

    Simply reminding you that Americans brew some rather fine beers these days. It’s not all Bud, Miller and Schlitz. And it hasn’t been for a while. IIRC, there were plenty fine brews available from American Microbreweries (as they were known back then) when I used to go there for work in the mid nineties. Around the time that UK real ale production was dying on its arse and everyone was drinking fricking Caffereys. πŸ˜€

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
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    The replacement of perfectly good, commonly used words and phrases by americanisms is not evolution.
    It’s more of a surrender. Or a betrayal.

    Now we get to the issue!

    Let’s face it, if you have such strong feelings about English as it was when you were taught, then that’s fair enough, but you should probably apply such stringency to your grammatical skillz before getting all uppity. πŸ˜‰

    Edit:

    I fairly sure we didn’t go from grunting in different pitches to speaking English

    Bristol?

    Premier Icon Moe
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    Hey ho, as always the glib tounge in cheek thread becomes something entirely different!

    philbert31
    Member

    Arseholes who say MOM, you’re from Oldham, not California…

    jruk
    Member

    DD – I actually agree with you, I remember tucking into some pretty nice stuff from Boston quite a while back.

    Anyway, back on topic…

    “color way” – aarrgghhh

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
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    bearnecessities – Member

    Now we get to the issue!

    Let’s face it, if you have such strong feelings about English as it was when you were taught, then that’s fair enough, but you should probably apply such stringency to your grammatical skillz before getting all uppity.
    Who’s uppity? Missed the smiley?
    I’m merely promoting an alternative viewpoint, in the interests of an intelligent and thoughtful debate.
    I like British English, with all it’s appropriations, mistakes and contradictions.
    I don’t like the way that English is being homogenised.
    It leaves us poorer as a society.

    As to my grammatical skillz, well, we all make mistakes, innit?
    I don’t use spellcheck on here either, as I’m sure you’ve noticed πŸ™‚

    Moe – Member

    Hey ho, as always the glib tounge in cheek thread becomes something entirely different!.
    There is always the slim possibility I might not be entirely serious.
    Cling to that thought and we’ll be fine.

    sunnrider
    Member

    “this hour”

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    Or did they mean pronouncing z as “zee” rather than “zed”?

    I think aracer was having a little joke when he said “Anything spelled with a zee”.

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    Anything that uses an unnecessary number of syllables.
    ……”Momentarily” meaning “soon”

    Except that’s not what it means; it means “for a moment”, not “in a moment”.

    I flew to Europe a couple of weeks back and the Captain announced that we would “be in the air momentarily”; I thought, I bloody hope not.

    Premier Icon aracer
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    ernie knows me too well – I was getting a bit worried there for a while that the standard of pedantry on here was slipping. Though it’s a multilayered joke, and you’d have had to read my contributions to the MH370 thread to get all the subtleties πŸ˜‰

    joolsburger
    Member

    Can I get, is a bit aggravating because it’s wrong and sounds rude. Worse is the use of like, like, literally all the time. It’s like – so annoying.

    I really like southern American accents and think a lot of American phrases add to our language not detract from it.

    stavaigan
    Member

    whats worse is brits using american pronunciation of english words. I heard a pure (uk) fud on radio 4 say route (as in pout) instead of route (as in soot). If fekn radio 4 are at it we are all doomed.

    chewkw
    Member

    “Dude”, “cool” … what do I know I am alien zombie maggot anyway. πŸ˜†

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
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    Math
    Hi, I’m your new best friend
    Is that to go….
    Heads up (note to self, be careful)
    De-plane
    Do you have de-caff? :wink (Nancy Reagan at Buck House)

    woodsman
    Member

    All of them please.

    busydog
    Member

    I’m in/from the US and I don’t take any offense at the opinions expressed in the thread and I must agree that we have most certainly convoluted the use of English as it was once was.

    Worse is the use of like, like, literally all the time. It’s like – so annoying.

    This^^^^—-especially prevalent among younger people, who use “like” half a dozen times in a sentence–almost as irritating as someone who says “umm” about every 4 or 5 words when speaking.
    Edit

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
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    gotten

    Eh? A more “correct” past participle of “got”, which was exported to the New World and neatly maintained without Brits making the effort and you’re complaining?

    You need to be careful: getting into this sort if ill informed chauvinism can confuse a stupid person.

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    busydog – Member

    I’m in/from the US and I don’t take any offense at the opinions expressed in the thread

    Good.
    Non intended on my part I can assure you. πŸ™‚

    ourmaninthenorth – Member

    gotten

    Eh? A more “correct” past participle of “got”, which was exported to the New World and neatly maintained without Brits making the effort and you’re complaining?

    Hmm.
    You could look at it another way:
    American English an British English are very different languages.
    Therefore, ‘gotten’ was not maintained by busydog and his countrymen, it was appropriated.
    It could be said that it is no longer a synonym for ‘got’, despite what some British English users, so eager to ape American culture, might think.

    You need to be careful: getting into this sort if ill informed chauvinism can confuse a stupid person.

    I don’t think an appreciation of British English could be classed as chauvinism without some other fairly substantial supporting evidence. πŸ˜€

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    They’re not different languages though are they? I can’t remember needing an interpreter when conversing with an American. Can you? At most, they might be considered different dialects – though even that would be a stretch.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
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    Depends on who you speak to DD*.

    For the purposes of our current discussion, I am taking the position that they are. πŸ™‚

    I would argue that if Scots English can be classed as a separate language, then American English should be thought of as worthy of the same honour.

    *Most linguists say no.
    I say yes. Bloody linguists, who the hell do they think they are anyway, coming round here with their research, facts and perfectly reasonable hypotheses?
    πŸ˜€

    CountZero
    Member

    From Mother Tongue, by Bill Bryson:

    One of the undoubted virtues of English is that it is a fluid and democratic language in which meanings shift and change in response to the pressures of common usage rather than the dictates of committees. It is a natural process that has been going on for centuries. To interfere with that process is arguably both arrogant and futile, since clearly the weight of usage will push new meanings into currency no matter how many authorities hurl themselves into the path of change.
    But at the same time there is a case for resisting change – at least slapdash change. As John Ciardi observed, resistance may in the end prove futile, but at least it tests the changes and makes them prove their worth.

    More here: http://homepage.eircom.net/~odyssey/Quotes/History/Mother_Tongue.html

    I would argue that if Scots English can be classed as a separate language, then American English should be thought of as worthy of the same honour.

    If it’s English, then by definition it’s the same language, just a different dialect.

    Sometimes relatively obscure British dialect words have been carried overseas, where they have unexpectedly prospered. The usual American word for stealing a look, peek, was originally a dialect word in England, existing in only three pockets of East Anglia – but that was the area from which many of the first immigrants came. Three of the most pervasive Australianisms, fair dinkum, cobber and no worries, appear to have their roots in English dialectical expressions.

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    Rusty πŸ˜†

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
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    Well, it’s an opinion, CZ. πŸ™‚

    Personally, I love the way British English continues with it’s natural evolution – immigration and assimilation have enriched our language immessurably and hopefully will continue to do so.

    However, there is simply no excuse for our media to promote americanisms where a perfectly satisfactory British English equivalent is in common usage.
    It’s cultural vandalism and should be treated with laughter, ridicule and contempt.

    Both my stepdaughters talk like they’re in an episode of ‘Friends’.
    I blame their mother for not beating it out of them when she had the chance and I also blame the media for it’s wholesale acceptance and promotion of American Culture in preference to our own.

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