Stans tubeless – do I ever bother again?

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  • Stans tubeless – do I ever bother again?
  • I’ve had this rim from new and have used Stans’ tubeless solution with it. The thing failed on me when a nipple broke, and once the tyre was off I noticed salt around the valve. Took the valve out and a chunk of rim came with it. It was also smelly and just horrid.

    My question is, should I avoid Stans forever and ever again, or is this a one off and I should just suck it up? It seems pointless that two products designed to work together actually feature a fluid that rots the rim.

    andylc
    Member

    How exactly are you proving that the Stans Sealant caused the rim to corrode? The fact that they were both together at the same time does not prove that.

    oldnpastit
    Member

    Stans contains ammonia. Ammonia attacks aluminium. Usually the metal has a layer of oxide which protects the metal underneath, but I guess if you put a scratch in it, then this will happen.

    (Insert usual disclaimer about hazily remembered A level chemistry).

    How long is ‘had the rim from new?’ I have used stans for 6 ish years and cant see why I would go backwards. Who says that water hasn’t been the reason behind the damage in a box rim.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Stans say:

    Any trace amount of ammonia in Stan’s sealant will evaporate soon after it is injected into the tire. We have found no damaging effects from our sealant even after years of use. Any oxidation in your rim will just as likely be caused by riding in wet conditions or the humidity in the air. Although tape may not be necessary to seal your rim, you may add one layer to protect un-anodized or scratched areas of your rim from oxidation due to moisture in the sealant.

    Northwind says, how likely is it that the 2 things are completely and dangerously incompatible but you’ve never heard of it happening before?

    Well, yes, it could be a million and one things, all completely my fault…. but my point is, it has just rotted away and yes, I am blaming the two products. I’ve got several sets of these things, so have invested heavily into the system. Quite frankly I’m hacked off that the rim had the temerity to just rot away before I had the chance to break it on a rock or such. That’s just poor form.

    Investment? I use a roll of insulating tape and a couple of valves for a tenner. If I wanted to change back, Its just unscrew the valves and fit a pair of tubes. Cant see how that’s a costly change, unless you spent money on stans kits ?
    Sadly, certain parts of a bike is lifed and a lot of people disregard this and expect it to last forever. A rim change is £40 ish for a rim and an hour of swapping spokes, so not the end of the world. Maybe the rim has been lifed?

    £70 just for the rim. I expected more in the way of life expectancy is all. Suck it up seems to be the answer, but for the life of me I’m bemused as to how I’m not to get scratches on my bike, or not get it wet. I’m still huffy about Stans though.

    I’ve just discovered very similar looking corrosion on one of my crests with leaky valve and nipple eyelets having used them with Stan’s for 3 years – the other wheel was fine. I plugged it with silicone sealant and then re stan’d it and it’s fine again. Fenwicks airtight did nothing but stain everything it touched blue.

    Premier Icon rickmeister
    Subscriber

    Sort of wondering.. if you wanted to run tubeless, why not buy a manufactured tubeless rim where you just put a tyre on ?

    orangeboy
    Member

    Unless I’ve missed it how old is your rim op

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    muddyground – Member

    £70 just for the rim. I expected more in the way of life expectancy is all

    And so you should, that’s what we’re saying- you’ve got something weird and unusual.

    rickmeister – Member

    Sort of wondering.. if you wanted to run tubeless, why not buy a manufactured tubeless rim where you just put a tyre on ?

    Like a Stans, what he bought?

    davewalsh
    Member

    OP, if you’re blaming the sealant, please explain how it has got to the other side of the rim tape to rot the rim, yet the air inside the tyre can’t escape?

    2 to 3 year old Stans ZTR rim, Stans sealant used. I like to use normal tyres, hence the sealant.

    OP, if you’re blaming the sealant, please explain how it has got to the other side of the rim tape to rot the rim, yet the air inside the tyre can’t escape?

    Red herring comment? The sealant goes between the outside world and the inside air – the valve being a notorious fun spot when trying to seal these things, hence the various posts about the use of pliers. All you have here is a little rubber bung; some fluid always escapes.

    I’m going to put this one down to a manufacturing defect and move on. I’ve never had this happen with any other rim and I’ve been tubeless for over a decade, hence why I’m slightly miffed. As stated, if it had been down to some trailside mishap, it would have been part of the experience that is mountain biking, and I’d have been happy. But I look after my bikes, so for this thing to turn to salt whilst sitting in the Man Cave is just not cricket.

    Just to be clear – all this fuss is about the little hole beside the valve hole?

    Not a lot of fuss – just a question on a forum is all. Kind of got my answer; Stans is OK, mine just sucks, chalk it up. I’ll junk the rim and get another. No biggie.

    Little hole? It’s almost the same size as the valve hole. Dunno, but I kind of like a bit of structural integrity in these areas.

    One more thought… Are the Stan’s valves steel or brass with shiny nickel coating or something? If they are steel, I suppose that in conjunction with some nice salty water, you could get competition corrosion of the aluminium rim in contact with the steel valve… Perhaps aided by water being trapped behind dried latex?

    PS, I have no intention of running a hacksaw through my expensive valves to find out what colour the inside is, but if you’re binning them, we’d be interested to know…

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    What is the white gooey stuff on the rim? Doesn’t look like dried stan’s sealant, and even if it was, it shouldn’t be under the rim tape and in the spoke holes? The yellow tape doesn’t leave a residue.

    Spoke holes is the original rim tape, valve hole is oxidised aluminium and Stans fluid.

    I’ve moved on now, but thanks for the replies. Nobody is jumping up and down over this, so obviously not an issue.

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