Ring-a-ding. (Cow-bell content)

Viewing 26 posts - 1 through 26 (of 26 total)
  • Ring-a-ding. (Cow-bell content)
  • Seems we’ve had a ‘near-miss’* with some walkers recently.
    One way for mountain bikers to make their presence known to other trail users would be use this movement-activated app…

    Even More Cowbell by Tom’s Apps, LLC
    https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/even-more-cowbell/id315908878

    Or, you could simply attach an actual cow-bell to your handlebars!

    Might make an interesting conversation point…

    “Nice bike. so are you on your own, or will there be any udders?”

    *as Ben Elton remarked, “a near miss would be a hit”

    Post-collision, the trailsides littered with woolly hats, jodhpurs and hydraulic fluid…
    “Well, we NEARLY missed them!”

    fossy
    Member

    Been thinking about a ‘Timber’ cowbell – I train on lots of shared paths and getting a little tired of the half deaf folk – might just help a little more with getting through headphones, as my voice doesn’t.

    Premier Icon kelron
    Subscriber

    They’re fairly effective, annoying to listen to constantly as the rider.

    ads678
    Member

    If the trail or path is too flat it doesn’t do a lot but give the handle bars a little wiggle and it sparks into action. Most people I go past seem more confused about the noise than anything else, they notice it though.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    They’re fairly effective, annoying to listen to constantly as the rider.

    You can turn the Timber Bell off so you don’t have to listen to it constantly. That’s the point of it. Works well ime.

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    kelron

    Subscriber
    They’re fairly effective, annoying to listen to constantly as the ride

    the whole point of the timberbell is that you can switch them to silent or have it ringing while keeping both hands on the bars

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    I tend to take the view that I don’t “train” on shared paths, but it depends on the exact nature of the path. Long straight sections with clear line of sight are fair enough.

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    bells are great if
    A)the person you are ringing it at is of a certain age, most people under 50 have no clue what a bell ringing signifies
    B) the person you are ringing it at isn’t wearing headphones and can’t hear your bell. i find tapping them on the shoulder hilarious, they jump quite high.
    C)the person you are ringing it at isn’t a belligerent **** who ignores it on purpose

    If only we had the ability to raise our voice a little louder, with a disarmingly cheery greeting, when approaching another trail user…. 🙂

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    If only we had the ability to raise our voice a little louder, with a disarmingly cheery greeting, when approaching another trail user

    see 2 & 3

    @tocketdog

    Then raise your heads to the heavens and sing, sing, sing..

    Premier Icon seosamh77
    Subscriber

    Bit late to the game 😆

    Onzadog
    Member

    We get a lot of positive comments from other trail users when we’re using our Timber Bells.

    Thanks for the input:)

    I decidedly to offer my opinion after viewing ‘that’ Cairngorms descent.

    The timber bell looks like a great product.
    TBH, I thought something like that would be years down the line!

    In the meantime, I’ll see how I get on with my app.

    More bovine nonsense…

    “Chanson le mooooooo!”

    Timber bell works fantastically never had anyone moan

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    The timber bell looks like a great product.
    TBH, I thought something like that would be years down the line!

    They’re good. The first version wore gradually to the point where the clapper wouldn’t stay in place on rough terrain – I fixed mine with a sharp knife and some bodgery with a zip-tie end to increase the friction – but the latest version is supposed to be fixed with a spring detente to hold things in place.

    The only other issue I’ve had is with mud on the inside of the bell muffling it slightly.

    Sure, some people won’t hear it / will employ the selective deafness technique learned from their dog, but ime it’s as good as it gets and doesn’t have the slightly demanding, high-pitched ping of many bells. It’s more politely melodic. Walkers seem to like it.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    If only we had the ability to raise our voice a little louder, with a disarmingly cheery greeting, when approaching another trail user…. 🙂

    You can do both. Or either. And rock a loud as hell free-hub too.

    Premier Icon xora
    Subscriber

    Randomness of the Timber Bell seems to get noticed more than a normal ding-ding bell!

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Subscriber

    Quite liking the idea of hanging a cowbell from a tree near blind bends, to be tapped by riders coming down the trail. and a sign on the way up saying listen for the cowbell!

    globalti
    Member

    Older walkers sometimes can’t hear high-pitched bells.

    deadkenny
    Member

    Timber bell now being sold by STW

    Discount for members or STW branding perhaps? 😉

    Not sold on them yet though. I can appreciate out with hill walkers and horse riders where the cowbell sound is pleasant and they tend to be less hostile to riders anyway.

    The miserable gits on the canal though are deaf, selectively deaf, headphones in, or otherwise looking for a reason to kick off. The approaching gentle cowbell sound might not get their attention. I find it difficult enough to get attention with a loud bell I’m ringing constantly.

    Though as I’ve often said, in the morning it’s a different matter. Happy friendly bunch. Seem to be fitter more active types out and they often spot me without even ringing a bell and greet me with a cheery hello before I’ve had a chance to say anything.

    Anyway, how are Timber bells in a crash? My regular crappy cheap bell got smashed up other week in a crash, and that’s with it mounted under the bar. So I’m after a replacement. It’s mainly for the towpath though and as I say I’m not sure this type will keep them from ranting.

    tjagain
    Member

    It would drive me insane to have a bell dinging all the time. My bikes must run silent!

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    Anyway, how are Timber bells in a crash? My regular crappy cheap bell got smashed up other week in a crash, and that’s with it mounted under the bar. So I’m after a replacement. It’s mainly for the towpath though and as I say I’m not sure this type will keep them from ranting.

    Mine have been fine. I use the ones that are held in place with an o-ring type thing and they simply rotate on the bar, plus I tend to have it quite centrally mounted where it’s not particularly exposed.

    They’re not an infallible means of vaporising walkers, but then nothing is. There are selectively deaf folk and folk with headphones in, but they’re a good, non-aggressive option that works well without getting people’s backs up.

    It would drive me insane to have a bell dinging all the time. My bikes must run silent!

    The whole point of the Timber Bell is that you can switch it on and off, so its not ‘dinging all the time’.

Viewing 26 posts - 1 through 26 (of 26 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.