• This topic has 299 replies, 19 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by Sanny.
Viewing 40 posts - 241 through 280 (of 300 total)
  • Riding the Wainwrights
  • Sanny
    Free Member

    @thegeneralist

    If the weather stays cold which it looks like it will then hell yes! Just do it, fella!

    Greatest journey start with first step……..If yesterday is anything to go by, you will struggle to find bogs of doom.

    This may help?

    Howgill Fells

    Howgill Fells & the Calf, which way round?

    So nowt to stop you!

    Cheers

    Sanny

    stevedoc
    Free Member

    I think im walking / Climbing bound in the Lakes this weekend as I managed a cheat work day Tuesday.  Nothing as grand as Sanny  but just as fun . I just managed a Hardtail loop from Waterhead  up over the side of Loughrigg towards Skelwith and Elterwater  Over Higher Timberthwaite and down for my slab of Cake from the Farm. Up and around Iorn Keld which wasnt to muddy for a change (thanks weather)  .  Back via the Quarry and Atkinson Coppice . Back via Sawtry woods to Elterwater and a spin to Loughrigg terrace which was quiet  apart from the Eurofighter that buzzed Rydal water as i was hoping the rocks …  Not a Wainwright day as such but still a good 4500 foot and 30 miles topped off with that Eurofighter .

    If plans change and my lad doesnt fancy climing Sunday the bike will be M6 north bound around 6.30am

    stevedoc
    Free Member

    The Howgills could be a great shout in hard pack 😉

    thegeneralist
    Free Member

    Wotcha climbing stevedoc?
    I’m intrigued about whether any ice might be in.

    stevedoc
    Free Member

    Its up to the Lad  whoms im collecting from Uni in the morning . He wanted to do the  Y Gribin Ridge  on flipflop mountain but I really am not a fan of Snowdonia on a weekend  at all.  I fancy something in the Langdales again  Jacks rake might be a challenge if that snow falls Saturday night 🙂 

    mark88
    Full Member

    I had hoped to get out on the bike today but thought better of it in the ice and ran instead.

    Went from Hartsop up to Gray Crag – I followed a steep direct route up, but from the bits of the path I was on it looks like it would be a decent enough descent. Across the top to Thornthwiate Crag was pretty unremarkable, but Thornthwaite Crag down via Thresthwaite Mouth…. very interesting.

    Has anyone ridden it? I reckon a better rider than myself would manage. Steep, techy, loose in parts. In the ice it was a real struggle on foot.

    justinbieber
    Full Member

    I’ve never ridden Grey Crag, but often wondered about the hills around there. I have “ridden” stoney cove pike to thornthwaite beacon, and thought it a silly idea. Looks equally daft heading back the other way 

    Sanny
    Free Member

    So another day, another ride. This time round, I decided to revisit a favoured haunt – Fairfield Horseshoe but with a winter twist. Thursday was bluebird with a huge covering of snow on the fells. I know it has been covered here previously but dang it, it is a classic. Starting at Rydal Mount, a thick layer of well trodden ice on the track made for an entertaining start. You have got to love Schwalbe Ice Spikers! I had planned to ride into Ambleside and go up via High Sweden Bridge but the steep track up off the path was too tempting to resist. It turns out that an e bike really does make it remarkably easy to get up – who knew? Following the track up Scandale Beck, I was able to ride all but the last little bit to get onto Low Pike. At 508 metres, it feels like an easy summit for not too much effort. However, the height gain belied what was to come. I had hoped for some well trodden lines through the snow but the eastern flank of the horseshoe does not enjoy the popularity of the west. As such, the tracks were narrow and lumpy meaning that my option of e bike with 29er tyres was playing second best to my fat bike. Cue much carrying. On the plus side, I meant plenty of chatty walkers who were keen to ask me what I was doing and why and seemed genuinely interested in the concept of riding in the high fells. A couple were bikers themselves and were intrigued by the notion of a lightweight e bike.

    I had hoped that the gradual rise from Scandale fell would be rideable but save for some wind blown sections and some proper battling through the deep snow which was actually easier to ride than following the tracks, it was a carry. On a positive note, it gave me plenty of time to check out the adjoining fells and to plan future adventures. In more favourable conditions, this section would make for a nice break in the hike a bike and would greatly speed upward progress.

    Hart Crag as remembered is a rocky carry up. It would be a pain to ride down and would really be a carry down with your bike. It confirmed what I already new – clockwise is not the way of truth for the Horseshoe. As the slope eased up, there were some incredible wind blown snow and ice formations to be found where the top dropped down to the valley far below. The going to the summit from here is a straightforward ride up and one to savour. As always, the views north to Dollywagon Pike, St Sunday Crag and Helvellyn are top notch.

    With a bit of a breeze building, I snapped off a few shots and then set about enjoying the very long and at times technical descent of Great Rigg and Rydal Fell. If you haven’t tried it, you are seriously missing out. It is an absolute joy with the short ups being rideable. As I had hoped, the greater numbers of feet through the snow made for much easier going than on the way up. It was an absolute hoot, even when heading off trail into the virgin snow for no better reason than just because I could. With plenty of daylight left, I decided to drop down to Stone Arthur. This is definitely one to return to. I would love to try it without a blanket of the white stuff as it was a lovely gradient that drops through some really interesting rocky outcrops. Of course, what goes down has to come back up so I retraced my tyre tracks before breaking off to follow some ski tracks that had been left from the day before to attain the main ridge again. Back on track, the gradual descent continued and I was grinning like a loon. Only when you are on it do you get a sense of quite how long it is. It is a ride that rewards the effort of the ascent in spades. I could have headed down to Alcock Tarn had I wanted a less technical finish but the final section from Nab Scar is one of my favourites – steep, stone pitched and with some lovely switchbacks, it is an unalloyed pleasure but not one to try for the first time in the snow if you have not done it before. If you do it, do it in the dry first would be my recommendation.

    Finally hitting the tarmac, I arrived back at the car with an enormous sense of satisfaction. As expected, the snow slowed progress considerably but it did not impede my enjoyment – rather it enhanced it. Winter days like this are to be savoured. I had had a notion to do the drop down to Seat Sandal but that can wait for another day. In terms of kit, the spikes were reassuring. They take the fear out of riding over ice. I broke out my Kahtoola Microspikes for the ascent and they proved to be the ideal tool for the job while a combination of mini gaiters and the tight cuffs of my 7 Mesh Thunderpants meant no snow got through to my socks. My feet were warm and dry the whole day despite having to break trail in knee deep snow.

    In summary, the Horseshoe is a real banger and well worth doing even in winter. Colour me happy!

    Cheers

    Sanny

    Sanny
    Free Member

    Ps Was it any of you lot who were out on the western section of the horseshoe the day before. I followed on pair of tracks down so clearly was not the only dafty!


    @stevedoc
    @justinbieber @mark88 @thenorthwind @thegeneralist

    Have you been getting out on any Lakes adventures recently?

    Cheers

    Sanny

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @neilthewheel @fergal @munrobiker

    How about you guys? Any adventures to report?

    Cheers

    Sanny

    mark88
    Full Member

    Impressive work. Not sure I’d have fancied riding up high in these conditions, though i’ve never tried ice spike tyres.

    Ps Was it any of you lot who were out on the western section of the horseshoe the day before. I followed on pair of tracks down so clearly was not the only dafty!

    I was up the eastern side of the horseshoe yesterday, but on foot. Beautiful lower down but once I was in the open I could barely stay upright at times and visibility became minimal. You made the right decision in leaving it for a day.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @mark88

    Good work going out when it was so windy. I’ve been up there when the weather closes in and it is an exposed place to be.

    The ice spikes work really well. Worth every penny and last for years. Like I wrote above, my fat bike would have been the better option but I only took delivery of fat ice tyres when I arrived back home from the ride. If you’ve not ridden it, definitely give it a shot. The Alcock Tarn descent is a good alternative for those who are not a fan of super steep trails.

    thegeneralist
    Free Member

    Sounds like a great adventure. I think it’s true to say that Fairfield Horseshoes is Defo best in winter. The alternative would be after a drought, but then it’d be mobbed with ramblears.

    Have you been getting out on any Lakes adventures recently?

    Funnily enough i think I was only about 4 km north of you.

    PXL_20240119_132925292~2

    stevedoc
    Free Member

    No Sanny  not for a few weeks. Like above ive been climbing and hiking more in Scotland of late ..I was looking if I can bag a few Munros  this year .

    thenorthwind
    Full Member

    Sounds like a cracking day out!

    Nothing to report from me, only been over to the lakes for a quick run over Christmas. Managed to get out for a ride and a bivvy in the nice cold weather but this side of the Pennines (Northumberland).

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @thegeneralist

    That looks fab. Where were you climbing?

    Glad to not be on the fell tops today though. MWIS are forecasting winds in excess of 100mph on the tops which would be brutal. You’d be crawling and dragging your bike behind you in that!

    So what has everyone got planned Lakes wise for the coming year then?

    Cheers

    Sanny

    fergal
    Free Member

    @sanny sorry to rub it in been in Spain last few months, climbing and stuff will be back shortly worse luck.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    So another update for the thread.

    Sunday saw me return to an old favourite, Hindscarth. I last rode the descent as a callow youth in 1997 on my Santa Cruz Heckler. It was a blisteringly hot day. I did it clockwise starting with Cat Bells and had no real clue what to expect. What I found was a joy of a descent with a steep and awkward walk down at the very end. I loved it but for some odd reason, had not returned to do it. Thus it was I headed up the Newlands Valley on Sunday on my test Pivot Shuttle SL with a keen sense of anticipation and slight concern. Had I misremembered it? Was it not really all that? They say distance lends enchantment but even so, a quarter of a century is a fair old while!

    Navigating the bog that is the saddle beneath Robinson, a snow covered path thereafter then a lovely descent before the final climb onto Hindscarth, I could feel the excitement building. Cresting the cloud covered summit, I wasted no time in dropping off the end. Was it as good as I had remembered? Hell yeah. It is a joy to ride down and pretty technical in places. The cloud came and went offering up tremendous views of the trail ahead. It is not a descent Ii would recommend as an introduction to lakes riding but it is a definite classic. The rocks were super greasy so a bit of discretion in a couple of places was called for. Being on my own, 2 short sections I would normally ride were walked down and my discretion proved wise. Even under foot, I felt myself slipping without warning.

    The final drop was a bit of a carry down in places as I remembered but it did not detract from an excellent descent. Definitely one I plan to return to in the not so distant future when it is warm and dry. The trail and the views are worthy of being savoured.

    Yesterday was a step into the unknown. I think it was @fergal who mentioned High Snockrigg earlier in this thread off Robinson. Keen to try something new, a quick carry up of no more than twenty minutes from Newlands Pass saw me riding over to the start of the descent. It is, in short, brilliant. There is one exposed section with a seriously consequential drop off to the side that could easily be fatal if you ballsed it up. With the bedrock even slippier than Sunday, I don’t mind admitting that I walked down those few yards. In the dry, I would happily ride it but sometimes you have to pick your challenges wisely. The descent is a mix of singletrack, switchbacks, exposed rock and some lovely long grassy sections. For not too much effort, it rewards in scenery and quality of trail in spades.  Being on the e bike, I then headed along to Crummock Water and rode up the Rannerdale valley – this is another gem but one which gets busy with walkers so best kept for midweek rides or evening trips. From the saddle, I followed a singletrack sheep trail that dropped me onto the Rigg Beck trail from Buttermere and headed north. I last rode this well over a decade ago and cabin report that it is still a treat. I even managed to despatch the steep section after the beck as I headed north. Say what you will about e bikes but boy can you climb stupidly steep stuff on them. The descent to what I still refer to as the Purple House is a real gem. Would it be good in the opposite direction? Quite probably.

    So two quick morning blasts and two gems. Happy days!

    Cheers

    Sanny

    TomB
    Full Member

    Love that rigg beck/sail beck route between Newlands and Buttermere, in either direction. Feels like old school ‘cross country’ mountain biking. Had a MRT job on Hindscarth on Saturday evening (nowt serious) but can confirm more greasy than is ideal for riding at this time of year. It’s a classic that’s a relatively easy push up from honister to dale head then a nice ride round to Hindscarth from there.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @TomB

    Glad it was not just me being a wuss. Even on the carry up from Newlands, I could feel my boots slipping. Better to come back on a warm and dry day than having to call you and your team out!

    Rigg Beck and Sail Beck are gems. It was none too muddy yesterday so made for a fun ride. I know what you mean about it being old school mountain biking.

    I am usually on a mission to ride multiple tops and trails when I am riding in the lakes so it was nice to go out and do a couple of quick hits without them being part of an all day epic. Glad I stayed off the bike on monday as there was some serious wind blowing down the Newlands Valley and over Buttermere water. Up top could have been a touch challenging.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @TomB

    Just been reading the rescue reports of the Keswick MRT. I had no idea of just how busy the team are even at this time of year! Fair play for getting the casualty off the side of Hindscarth on Saturday as it really drops off steeply. I tip my hat to you for the work that the team does.

    lowey
    Full Member

    The route north from the Summit of Robinson via Blea Crags and High Snab Bank is also a cracker with just one short carry down.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @Lowey

    Lovely pic that. Any other gems you would recommend?

    Cheers

    Sanny

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @fergal

    Been back through this thread. What ways off of mellbreak, gavel and Blake would you recommend? Just trying to plot a route out on the OS map.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    lowey
    Full Member

    Cant comment on Melbreak but the two lines here are absolute cracking descents. You can use both from Blake and Gavel. Best in the dry

    https://www.streetmap.co.uk/map?x=311800&y=519476&z=115&sv=311800,519476&st=4&ar=y&mapp=map&searchp=ids&dn=820&ax=311800&ay=519476&lm=0

    https://www.streetmap.co.uk/map?x=312315&y=519359&z=115&sv=312315,519359&st=4&ar=Y,y&mapp=map&searchp=ids&dn=820&ax=312315&ay=519359&lm=0

    I’d ascend Blake from Cogra Moss, fireroad mostly with a steep carry before Sharp Knott. The over Blake and onto Gavel. The path is pretty good singletrack off Gavel, but the first one above is my favourite. Not techy, bust steep and flowy. YMMV.

    lowey
    Full Member

    Some Cracking views from Blake Fell

    Top of the ST descent to Loweswater.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @lowey

    That is brilliant. Cheers for that.

    Any other little gems, please feel free to share them.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    Sanny
    Free Member

    So thread update time.

    The Sunday before Easter I took advantage of a smashing weather window and headed for Buttermere. I aimed form a seven summit day and struck good weather gold. Starting at the base of Fleetwith Pike, I navigated past some particularly inquisitive Highland Cows to ride the bridleway along the southern shore of Buttermere. It is an easy and gentle affair with much to commend it. At the falls, I continued along the footpath to Crummock Water. This was a very pleasant number despite there being a few sections of bog and lumpy bedrock that impede progress a little. Nothing too terrible though and the scenery was stunning. I met a solo walker who was on a mission to stay out all day and that night but with no real plan other than that. i admired his simple approach as he broke out his fishing rod by the small spit of land that extends into the lake and would make for a superb bivvy spot.

    Following the trail up through some woods, i joined the path up onto Mellbreak from the western end. it is steep, loose and scree laden. As I made my way up with one questionable line choice up a steep and loose gully, I decided it would make for a disappointing descent – too loose, steep and steppy to be fun unless you like carerying down stuff. Cresting the first top, i met an older woman and her dog Oscar the Petterdale Terrier. She was bemoaning hgow slow she was following a stroke 3 years ago but fair play to her to be on the fells and showing no signs of having had a stroke.

    There is a short descent followed by a gradual rise to the top proper. despite two weeks of rain, it was amazingly dry for the most part. The descent down to the bridleway is a grassy peach. Steep but grin inducing. Well worth the effort to get up it. Very dry as well unlike thge bridleway to Flotern Tarn and the pass which followed. The next section made me glad to be on the fat bike. There are limpy sections and sections off wet moss but it does slowly geyt better the higher up you get. It is not a bridleway you would rush to do but it is a means to an end.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    Next up was the steep but shortish carry onto Great Borne. It looks like a wall but it is a steady climb up that is over faster than you expect. The rocky summit of Great Borne affords great views in every direction while the distant peak of Red Pike seems miles away. I dropped off the summit on a well defined rocky track that soon turned to a fast and flowy grass descent. It was easy going and set the template for the rest of the ride by being almost completely dry and mud free. There is a nice mix of riding and easy pushing over Starling Dodd and onto Red Pike. I contemplated the steep chute down to Bleaberry Tarn but the reward of the steps of despair after it held no attraction.

    As some walkers played with a drone, another questioned my sanity for taking my bike up to the summit and informed me how running was better. I respectfully disagreed for running is the work of satan in my book.

    lowey
    Full Member

    How did you get off Red Pike then ? Onto High Stile – High Crag ?

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @lowey

    Sorry. Had to have my tea half way through posting. Doh!

    Sooooo – Red Pike to High Stile was straight forward with the obligatory stunning views. The cliffs are incredible and just as impressive from above as below. It was another down and up to get to High Crag where I happened upon a rather lovely down jacket in a stuff sac that had been left by a walker. I’ve posted on here and UKclimbing about it but no takers so far. The riding up to this point was not exactly difficult. There were bits of pushing on the ups so it would not be a flow trail but in terms of location and scenery, I absolutely loved it.

    The descent off of High Crag will either be a joy or an arse depending on how you approach it. I eschewed the stone pitch steps option and found myself scree surfing down the slope to the south of the main path. It was an absolute hoot on the fat bike and by the time I reached the bottom, I was grinning from ear to ear. It was just the right mix of steep and loose for me to savour. From the levelling, I opted to head over Seat. With it being around 6 in the evening and the walkers having cleared off the fell, I opted to walk the trickier parts as I was conscious that I was on my own – albeit with a spare down jacket to keep me warm if I binned it! One to return to. The alternative would have been to follow the wall down to Scarth Gap from the levelling. One to do next time I reckon.

    Not ready to go home just yet, i headed up onto Haystacks. It is a carry all the way up and would be a rubbish descent in the other direction. there are a couple of slightly awkward step ups but nothing to give me any concern. Being AW’s favourite fell, with the sun going down, it was easy to see why he loved it so. The descent and traverse over the other side via Inominate tarn was definitely enjoyable but with the light fading, I don’t mind admitting to walking down a couple of short sections that I would normally ride. The sensible head kicked in and it did not affect my enjoyment. After a day of much up, my big reward came in the form of the Fleetwith Pike Bridleway descent. It was a great as ever although in the encroaching darkness, it ain’t half spicy when on your own. Line choice that is easy in the day took on a new level of challenge. still bloody good fun though…….

    All told, another great day in the fells and one I would happily repeat.

    So @fergal @mark88 @lowey @neb @justinbieber @thegeneralist @TomB @thenorthwind @munrobiker

    Any new adventures to report?

    I have to say that looking at the fells from Mellbreak, Hen Combe, Blake Fell and Gavel look like grassy singletrack goodness to be explored next.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    lowey
    Full Member

    Good stuff! Never done Haystacks on the bike and dont really fancy it much from my recollections of walking it years ago. I think the scree / grass down Gamlin End is far more preferable to the pitching.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @lowey

    Interested to return to do the wall descent. Your tips re Gavel and Blake have gotten me excited to try those tops next. Thanks!

    I liked Haystacks but can see it not being everyones cup of tea. I want to go back and ride it fresh.

    I reckon the route in reverse would be a bit meh. Nice to be in the fells but you would be missing out some lovely technical riding. I saw tracks on Floutern Tarn and felt a bit sorry for whoever rode it before me on a normal bike. The fat bike made it much more enjoyable than it would otherwise have been.

    The only downside of the ride was my rear hub decided to have a piece of pawl break off. I thought I was going to be stuck riding effectively a fixed wheel but it came unstuck. Big up to ISON for warrantying it for me. Did not expect that but was well chuffed that they did.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    mark88
    Full Member

    Absolutely nothing from me. When the weather is so poor I have zero enthusiasm to get out on the bike.

    I’ve been running a fair bit and have done a few Wainrights recently but none I’d be rushing back to ride;

    Barf and Lords Seat – worth adding into a Whinlatter ride but wouldn’t travel specifically to do

    Sallows and Sour Howes – grassy and bogggy, some bits look like they would be fun in the dry but there’s better options in the area.

    Robinson – climbed up from Newlands, that would be largely unrideable as a descent. Descended via Hassnesshow Beck which was super steep, washed out and straight. Stick to the usual High Snockrigg descent.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    @lowey @fergal

    Took your advice and rode off Blake down the switchbacks yesterday as part of a six summit day. It was an absolute joy. A wee bit damp up top but to be expected after all the rain of late. I will do a write up  later but it was a smashing day out and your local knowledge was spot on.

    Fellbarrow was a real treat too. I reckon next time I will descend off Sourfoot Fell heading north even though dropping off Low Fell was good fun in itself. Has anyone ridden it?

    Cheers

    Sanny

    lowey
    Full Member

    You had lovely weather for it on Saturday, but yes, I would imagine it was a bit wet up there.

    No experience of the fells north of Loweswater, be very interested to hear your route and thoughts.

    Sanny
    Free Member

    Thread update time again!

    So the Loweswater Fells. Last Saturday was a step into the unknown for me and Dave. With the sun shining, we parked up on shore of the Lake and were climbing from the off. Starting somewhat steeply through the trees, we headed up the bridleway due west of Fellbarrow. Cresting the high point, we followed a grassy track that led directly to the summit. There was a bit of pushing but not much. From there, we headed south following the rise and fall of the hillside on easy to follow grassy tracks. Crossing Sourfoot Fell, we spotted a zig zag descent heading north towards Thackthwaite. It looks like a very clear and well defined track so one to try next time. Passing a camper making an early start pitching above Raven Crag, we quickly reached the top of Low Fell. The views are truly stunning Descent wise, we doublked back about 50 metres before following the fence line down a steep track to cross the watershed below Darling Fell. After that,it is grassy singletrack south and west to the old quarry before hitting a Land Rover track for the final section of descent.

    As quick hits go, it is well worth a look. The views are truly incredible looking towards Buttermere and out to the coast.

    Next up was Burnbank Fell, Blake Fell and Gavel. We followed the bridleway that heads over towards Fangs Brow before cutting onto the bridleway that is high above Loweswater. Spotting a steep path up the side of the fell, we hike a biked for some 15 minutes to get onto the shoulder of the fell to start riding again. We followed a clear grassy track all the way up to the summit where there is a cairn beside the fence. Not the most exciting summit but it was a gateway to better things.

    Following the fence line, we made our way across at times boggy moss before eventually reaching the summit of Blake Fell. In terms of viewpoint, this is another fine fell. There was a fair number of walkers at the top who were clearly enjoying the nice weather and views down to Cogra Moss and beyond. Dropping off the summit, we headed east for a quick out and back to Gavel Fell. It was somewhat sloppy in places by the fenceline. One just to tick off although I would be interested to try the singletrack heading north. Taking @lowey ‘s advice, we opted for the zig zag descent down to the tarn and High Nook Farm. Despite the moistness under tyre at the start, the descent is a cracker. You start gently before losing height at a rapid rate. Definite winner!

    Hitting the valley floor, we headed for the Kirkstile Inn and an out and back on Hen Comb. An initial steep push is followed by a grassy quad bike track that is a bit too steep and moist in places making the going somewhat hard. For a fell that is not particularly long or high, it felt like  bit of a slog. At the top, we met a chap with his family who is training barefoot to walk all of the Wainwright’s in September. Cannot say that sounds like a lot of fun but fair play to him. Dropping off the top, we bypassed the loose track for the grass as the top was just a bit too loose for comfort. The rest of the descent was fairly gentle and enjoyable but the damp ground meant it was not as fast as we had hoped. Probably one best left to a frozen day or baking hot summer’s evening.

    All told, another enjoyable day out.

    thegeneralist
    Free Member

    So, if I were to have a few hours free tomorrow evening from Coniston, once all the ramblears have gone, what hill would one recommend?

    Done WSR, Dow, OMC then north into Little Langdale, which was ok.

    Done OMC. Loved the middle bit but the first bit down from the summit was way too hard.

    Was thinking of Wetherlam, but it doesn’t seem to get much love on these pages…. dull & grassy seems to be the word.

    Having said which, I’ll be alone and deeply out of shape, so perhaps dull and grassy is the ticket

    Tell me

    Sanny
    Free Member

    Weatherman for the win. Did it a week last Wednesday. It was a joy. We finished below the mines which gave some 3 kilometres of joy. A mix of everything and not just grassy. Do it!

    Sanny
    Free Member

    We rode the Lad stones descent and it was an absolute winner. Nothing scary on it but lots of flow. would go back in a heartbeat. Have fun and post some pics!

Viewing 40 posts - 241 through 280 (of 300 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.