Viewing 31 posts - 281 through 311 (of 311 total)
  • No mow May
  • wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    We’re in again! Parts don’t get mown at all, some parts once in September and other parts occasionally on the highest setting. Beneficial to wildlife, use less energy (mine and the planets), and provides a lot of interesting stuff to look at.

    J-R
    Full Member

    Our no mow area hasn’t been mown since the autumn and is already bright with yellow cowslips, primroses and purple bugle. No sign of the yellow rattle yet but last year that appeared later.

    zippykona
    Full Member

    I’m in did a mow on Monday but mowed around the daisies.

    stevious
    Full Member

    You mean I get to avoid my least favourite domestic chore AND help nature? I am IN.

    wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    IMG_2479

    Edukator
    Free Member

    For the first time in years I’ve mown the lot but on the highest setting. I’d got more compost than I need so mowed and spread.

    poolman
    Free Member

    Wildflower meadow planted here just need some sun to get growing.  Do still mow as I want to make compost.  Rhubarb cropping already.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    If you have yellow rattle the plants should be coming up and very recognisable by now, albeit small. Pairs of fairly thin serrated-edge leaves in a cross shape (ie alternating pairs).

    Planning a summer(*) cut this year for a change, as various perennials are starting to take over. I’ll cut round a few things I want to keep, but I don’t want too many of them!

    (*) ok based on last year’s weather I’d better call it a July cut, summer or no!

    zippykona
    Full Member

    I have mown my lawn this weekend but left a bit in the middle where the daisies are.

    Apparently bees like daisies. We’ve been out in the garden all day and I’ve not seen a bee on them all day. They are too busy on the foxgloves and other unknown flowers.

    Am I wasting my time leaving daisies or can I treat myself to a nice neat lawn?

    kormoran
    Free Member

    Have left most of my garden this year apart from a 50cm wide edge strip which keeps the garden looking neat and gives a nice path to walk around and view the longer grass and the millions of beautiful little blue flowers that have come up and been allowed to reach fruition. Absolutely stunning this year! There’s so much to see if you let it grow, and with the cut strip it looks classy I think.

    Lots of bees having a buzzy time

    Various insects on our daisies, it’s all good 👍🏿

    Some of the taller grasses are beautiful

    Our borders are a mix of grasses, bluebell, pentaglottis, various sweet pea and geranium, all looking ace. One evening last week we eat outside, the dandelion were about to seed and the sun shining through all the heads was stunning

    kayak23
    Full Member

    A call for No Mow Summer

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    Had an epic bug paradise developing on the front verge (we were letting the street down by refusing to cut it back). Sadly, it started making the wrong kind of buzzing noise last week, accompanied by puffs of smoke, and now we have a six foot deep trench instead.

    stevious
    Full Member

    This is our second summer* in this place and the front lawn seems to be recovering a bit from the previous owners’ golf-course style of lawn care. Got a few species of flower poking through so am leaving it apart from a couple of paths through the long stuff.

    The back lawn is just grass, but longer. Decided to give it a chop yesterday because I wont have a chance for a while and the kids asked for somewhere easier to kick a football. Going to keep thinking of more ways to improve the biodiversity in the back, but we seem to be getting plenty of bees on all the granny flowers**.

    * Nothern Scotland, so you might want to put sarcastic quote marks around that

    ** I don’t know any of the actual species but you know the kind of thing.

    Northwind
    Full Member

    I gave in and cut it a few days early just because of the weather forecasts, tbf it was completely rubbish, just long grass and an occasional dandelion. On the plus side, cutting long grass is so much more satisfying than short grass.

    All the borders and such are wild flowers and left pretty much wild so hopefully that balances ot

    Bunnyhop
    Full Member

    We’re coming up to the end of No Mow May.

    It’s been interesting as the weather hasn’t been the best and many of the plants in the lawn have taken a while to show themselves. The best has been the return of the red clover, which appeared about 4 years ago, there are some yellow rattle plants, cuckoo flower (which will be lovely next year) and many other wild flowers ready to bloom once we get a bit more warmth.

    Also lovely are the long grasses blowing in a breeze, buzzing with many insects. I shall mow a path next weeks and a seating area, but leave the rest.

    Are we now ready to Embrace ‘Let It Bloom June’?

    Dickyboy
    Full Member

    Anyone else seen titchmarsh comment against no mow may in the telegraph 😕 just putting our house on the market & estate agents quite happy with the long grass as no mow may is so well known 👍

    And yes we’ll be leaving our patch probs till Sept like last year.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    Wild patch is a mass of things, always a lot of dandelions early on and now yellow rattle taking over. Our remaining “proper” lawn didn’t get much mowing in May and very few flowers anyway. Might be better off abandoning it to nature but I’ll keep plugging away for now.

    convert
    Full Member

    I’ve only cut around the edge of the house, the perimeter of the lawn and a couple paths to the benches. It don’t look great truth be told. If it was like a swath of machair I’d be happier but whilst at the same latitude we are inland of the coast rather than a strip next to the beach.

    Without trawling all the way back, anyone had any luck scattering wildflower seeds to make it both more attractive to the wildlife and aesthetically more rich?

    stevious
    Full Member

    Are we ready to embrace ‘Let it Bloom June’?

    I’m fully bought in to ‘I hate mowing the lawn whatever the month is’ 🙂

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    I think wildflower seeds on a well-established lawn has limited success. They have to get to the soil, germinate, make it through….there’s a high rate of attrition. I bought in the yellow rattle and it has worked very well but it went onto a very scrappy bit of partially-bare land after I’d scraped off a good bit of the turf.

    The other thing is the seeds need to suit the soil type and climate, whatever is already growing locally probably has a better chance. Red poppies are a waste of time here but the yellow welsh ones grow like, well, weeds.

    J-R
    Full Member

    I got the yellow rattle to take on our previously well established lawn – it’s blooming quite nicely now.  But I think you have to be careful to ensure the seeds get in contact with some soil.

    But I am not so sure our plug plants from last year  have really done much this year – it seems to be more the local flowers from hedge rows and what on the borders I’d consider as “weeds” that are happiest.

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    Not watched the video above but no more may is a bit simplistic. Just letting a grass lawn grown long in may is a bit of a waste of time. Letting vegetation that contains a few wildflowers grow long in may is better, letting a wild patch grow long and leave long over winter is even better, just now it a few times a year if possible. Letting a patch of lawn grow long and expecting a grand display of wildflowers is a fools errands. Generally most of the perennial wildflowers are poor dispersers so you need to sow them in or even better plant some plugs. Seed mixes of colourful annuals on bare ground will give a nice display and help the bees etc but they won’t persist long.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    My garden after a couple of weeks of warm and wet weather is exploding. I can barely keep up with weeds / growth on patio and paths, and the banking and tree areas we mow early then don’t touch for a few months are knee+ deep in the space of a couple of weeks. A really gentle spring, with no late frosts, then this warm and wet…

    crab
    Free Member

    Yeah I saw that video a few days ago, the guy has a point, so I’ve divided my pretty small bit of lawn (6mx6m) into two areas, one half I’ll keep short ish, and the other I’m just going to let it grow all summer and probably cut it down late autumn. Get a lot of wildlife in my garden (hedgehogs and lots of small birds) and I think they like the unkempt ness of it.

    kormoran
    Free Member

    Anyone else seen titchmarsh comment against no mow may in the telegraph 😕

    Yes I saw that but then saw it was the telegraph so just thought “oh piss off”

    As Matt says the last week has seen a big burst of growth and colors. Lots of warm and wet doing a turbo boost

    I think a lot depends on the grasses in your lawn, mine is thoroughly swamped with tiny blue flowers, they aren’t specially planted just lawn plants that have been allowed to grow.

    I’d really like some hedgehog action to deal with the slugs, our last house had a spiky resident but short of a kidnap I’m not sure how one acquires a hedgehog.

    Any advice?

    crab
    Free Member

    Well the one obvious thing is to make sure this an easy way in for them, I have a little hedgehog sized cutout on the bottom of my side gate. I sometimes put food out, but the challenge is not attracting every cat or magpie in the area. You can make a cat proof hedgehog feeding stations to get round that.

    I think a lot of it depends on where you are too, the estate I’m on is pretty much all cul de sacs with a band of semi woodland running through the middle. I think it’s mostly the lack of fast traffic that means they do well around here.

    Edit to add, obviously you’re going to stand a better chance of attracting them if your garden has areas of cover and undergrowth. I have a border of huge shrubs along my fence line and I’ve scattered dead wood underneath that, makes for great cover/habitat.

    Bunnyhop
    Full Member

    anagallis_arvensisFull Member
    Not watched the video above but no more may is a bit simplistic.

    It’s worth watching. I enjoyed it a lot.

    Yes wildflower meadows need hardly any nourishment, so a bit of work is needed. The first year it can look great, but there after maybe not so. Poppies for example need the whole area turned/ploughed over to germinate the seeds again.

    As others have said, flowers/weeds tend to plant themselves where they want to be. Our path is full of valaria, herbs, wild strawberry, Astrantia, aquilegia, buttercups, foxgloves and others I can’t name, they arrived without any help from me.

    Kormoran – the little blue flowers sound as though they are ‘speedwell’.

    Bunnyhop
    Full Member

    Our wild path.

    IMG_4419

    IMG_4417

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Love it.

    thomas132
    Full Member

    I made a hedgehog feeder a while back out of a pallet to encourage them into the garden a while back.  Seems to work really well, needs a u-bend to keep it the cats.  We had a mother and pups living in our leaf pile for a while, they’re often regularly on the garden and I’ve tripped over a hedgehog at least one (no harm done).

    20220611_183647

    I’ve left the back lawn grow long, but generally mow it in June.  The front lawn I’ve stripped off and put in wildflowers with a mown a path in the middle, not in full bloom yet, but a few bits are starting now.  I’ll only mow that once a year

    IMG_20240521_184410312

    kormoran
    Free Member

    Thanks for the hedgehog tips everyone, the pallet bothy looks ace!

    ,@bunnyhop yes that is the flower, thanks! It’s everywhere, it looks great amongst the grasses. Very pretty and meadow like, it is the best we’ve had and without even trying.

    I’ve got a load of teasels on the go this year, beautiful flowers and Finches love the seeds. They look great in the winter especially against the snow and frost. Once you’ve got a couple they seed themselves very easily

Viewing 31 posts - 281 through 311 (of 311 total)

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