ironman vs ultra distance triathlon

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  • ironman vs ultra distance triathlon
  • Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    are you only doing it to tell people you did it?

    mrmo
    Member

    who are most folks? people i work with are impressed i ride 16miles each way to work! To me Ironman is just successful branding, not sure how much currency it carries with “normal” people.

    LHS
    Member

    Don’t do anything to tell other people you have done it. That’s a really poor reason. Do it for the challenge to you. Anything will suffice for that. Pick something unique if you want to impress!

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    Go over to tritalk/runnersworld to investigate this can of worms!

    No easy answer IMO. Personally for me, an ironman refers to the distance/challenge not the Ironman brand per se. But at the very least don’t get an Mdot tattoo after doing an equivalent distance event as an acquaintance of mine did!!!

    For me, I would do the non branded event and still consider myself an ironman. Who cares what anyone else thinks anyway?

    ultracoach
    Member

    Done 4 iron-distance races in the UK….a Double Iron distance in Holland….and twice done a Triple Iron distance race in germany.
    Going back to Iron distance next year , and it will be in the UK…but never a branded Ironman. Just do not see the value in their races…..400£ touch for a race….???
    It is up to each person obviously, and some cherish that M-Dot branding.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    Yes I would just say Ironman – as it’s just a brand, as I’d say that we’d bought a new Hoover etc. they’re synonymous.

    Premier Icon huckleberryfatt
    Subscriber

    If it’s a one-off thing then I’d go for a great location, great course and great organisation—I’d want to enjoy the event and not spend the day doing laps of an industrial estate. That might be a big brand thing but not necessarily
    Ironman does kinda make you sound like you wear your pants over your trousers …

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    If you were only planning on doing one event, rather than getting into them regularly, would you feel the need to make it an “ironman” or would a local ultra mean the same?

    Is it worth the extra cost to be an “ironman”?

    Would you tell people you were an ironman if you “only” did the ultra as most folks wouldn’t appreciate the difference?

    DrP
    Member

    Just get the tattoo and be done with it.
    None of this jogging and swimmin’ malarkey needed…

    DrP

    redwoods
    Member

    njee20 – Member
    Yes I would just say Ironman – as it’s just a brand, as I’d say that we’d bought a new Hoover etc. they’re synonymous.

    Don’t tell him that! The pedant in him will never let him do anything other than the Ironman now. (We own a Dyson fluff-picker-upper so have to refer to the activity with it, as ‘vacuuming’.) 😉

    Mrs Onzadog

    richardk
    Member

    Done one of each, nobody outside of triathlon knows the difference (anything in that distance gets called an ironman), so pick the race that matches your ambition or skills best, and that has a good reputation.

    The little touches on Mdot are good (name on your number so people who don’t know you can’t shout support), but you pay a price for that. Ironman races are the only way to get to race in Hawaii (world champs) if you’re that way inclined.

    I’m going back to half IM distance next year, and will be doing local, non Mdot branded races as supporting local organisers is now my priority.

    If you want a recommendation, look at Outlaw for a fantastic IM distance UK race.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Oddly enough, it’s the outlaw I’m considering against Bolton. They’re only a week apart. Outlaw is local to me and £200 cheaper than Bolton, plus no need for hotel bills.

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