Frisky cattle up on Baslow Edge

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  • Frisky cattle up on Baslow Edge
  • marcus
    Member

    Me and the family came close to being skewered / trampled yesterday whilst out walking on the bridleway near Wellingtons monument near Baslow. At one stage I was pinned up against the stone wall by the woolly bully, before having to run in one direction with the dog, allowing the wife and kids to escape the other way. They were being proper protective of their calves, which were hidden in the long grass until it was too late. I’m a fairly laid back person, but felt the incident serious enough to fill in a form on the HSE website, making my self feel like a right townie. Not sure the cattle have the right temperment for being in a field with public access.

    Premier Icon mugsys_m8
    Subscriber

    I know of at least one guy who got mauled several years ago whilst out runnning in the peak. He was in a very bad way. Think it might have even been over on the eastern edges: might even have been Baslow.

    I would of thought it more useful to contact the farmer and/or the national park wardens though.

    devash
    Member

    “…before having to run in one direction with the dog”

    There’s your problem right there. Always release your dog if cornered by cattle. Its the dog they’re bothered about, not you.

    Premier Icon Esme
    Subscriber

    Ah yes, I’ve encountered those scary cows. I guess the combination of calves and a dog don’t mix. A warning sign might help, I suppose, although you obviously have every right to be there.

    Piccies

    marcus
    Member

    Devash – I did in the end, but she’s 14 and can’t really run. – It got to the point where she was a worthy sacrifice though  !

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    before having to run in one direction with the dog

    As above. Let the dog go. It can outrun cattle, you can’t. EDIT: Maybe… 🙂 I’d imagine having a load of heifers up your tail can reinvigorate even an elderly dog!

    Was there a bull in with them? I believe there are restrictions on bulls of certain cattle breeds being in fields with ROWs. Mainly dairy breeds – Holstein etc.

    wrightyson
    Member

    They can be very intimidating. I had to thrash **** out of a few with a big stick last summer to get them to back off. But as above same scenario as we had the dog with us. They are the issue but my dogs a **** and would just run off and I’d never see him again so it’s not really an option for us.

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    Is this the perp?

    whitestone
    Member

    Generally it’s only bulls of recognised beef breeds that are allowed outside, even then they have to be with a certain number of cows.

    Given that the cows had calves and you had a dog with you that’s more likely a reason for their interest/aggression.

    A few years ago when out running I was floored by a cow, luckily for me once she’d got me on the ground she lost interest. I had a chat with the farmer, he’d actually no fields he could put his cattle in to that hadn’t got a ROW through it. He also noted that putting a sign up is itself fraught with difficulties: any wording that implies a known risk can’t be used, hence the anodyne “Bull in field” type notices.

    Yes you’ve a “right” to walk in the countryside with your dog but that needs to be tempered with some common sense even if it means altering your plans.

    Premier Icon jeffl
    Subscriber

    Cycle up there semi regularly and never had a problem. Have randomly talked to/at them when they had calves so they knew I was there. It’s a fairly well trafficked area with walkers, runners, cyclists and horse riders so the cattle should be used to people. Unless they’ve had some new one’s in who are learning the ropes.

    marcus
    Member

    That’s her Martin, except, the horns looked bigger close up !

    You were probably best trying to find an alternative route before entering a field with calves especially if you had a dog with you.

    marcus
    Member

    Thanks Glenn. – If only the calves had been visible and / or there was a warning sign.

    Thanks Glenn. – If only the calves had been visible and / or there was a warning sign.

    I wasn’t trying to be a smart arse, just offering a bit of friendly advice.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    A couple were trampled at the weekend near Milngavie, to the North of Glasgow. Tbh I don’t go in a field with cows, particularly at this time of year, if I can help it. And that’s without having a dog.

    Don’t complain about it, unless the cattle were somewhere they shouldn’t have been.

    marcus
    Member

    No worries Glenn.

    Not sure it’s complaining Nobeer. – I just wouldn’t like anyone to get hurt up there.

    Premier Icon rone
    Subscriber

    Cycle up there semi regularly and never had a problem. Have randomly talked to/at them when they had calves so they knew I was there. It’s a fairly well trafficked area with walkers, runners, cyclists and horse riders so the cattle should be used to people. Unless they’ve had some new one’s in who are learning the ropes.

    Me too.

    I guess animals are just unpredictable.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    I appreciate you’re not complaining as such, but taking a dog into a field of recently calved cattle is leaving oneself open a bit, it’s pretty much common sense, You can’t put signs up about everything.

    Sometimes the public have to take a bit of personal responsibility, and I’m no fan of farmers in general btw.

    Premier Icon jeffl
    Subscriber

    To be fair to the OP he couldn’t see the calfs as they were hiding in the long grass. Pluss it’s a big open area roughly the shape of a triangle so you can easily enter in one corner and not know the cows are there until a copule of miles later. And if ou can’t see the calfs then you’d reasonably carry on.

    Cows can be interesting. On a night ride in the Peaks a few years back I started riding though this boggy field, in the middle of summer, and noticed there were loads of cows in it. Decided that discretion was the better part of valour did a u-turn and took a five mile road diversion instead.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    I’m not criticising the OP at all, as I’m well aware he couldn’t see the calves. All I’m saying is that there is no point at all contacting the farmer as he’d quite rightly tell you to do one. Taking a dog into a field of one tonne nutters is a risk at any time, never mind spring time.

    YMMV.

    Premier Icon Caher
    Subscriber

    In the USA cows kill more people than sharks but that odd static aside having grown up and visited cousins farms I’d be very cautious entering any field where there are calves and certainly not with a dog.

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    In the USA cows kill more people than sharks

    Tubbies choking to death on chunks of steak doesn’t count.

    Klunk
    Member

    I startled a calf once on the bike, his mum was none too impressed and came “barrelling” down the trail after me, I discovered a sprint I never knew I had that day 🙂

    Premier Icon funkrodent
    Subscriber

    Had similar issue in Scotland couple of summers ago. Was with then 9 yr old son and dog. Entered field with Friesians in. Couple started taking a proper interest. Let dog go and told son not to run. We started walking for gate, they started to canter, we gently jogged. When we were within 20 yards of the gate I told him to sprint like hell! Was properly scary, particularly because I had the boy with me. Strange thing is I grew up in the country and used to being around cows (Phnaar, phnaar), but there was something menacing about this.

    On way back decided to skirt field. 3-4 cows followed us on the other side of the wall. As we came to the end, I realised that the wall stopped and the cows could just come round the end and meet us. I had run like buggery, thrown the boy over the electric fence at the end and failed spectacularly to vault it cleanly (the electric shock isn’t that bad, unless you p1$$ on it which is another story) before I realised that a similar fence blocked the end of the cow’s field where the wall stopped and we were safe.

    Moral of the story, approach with caution and probably not with a dog at all..

    ..and regardless of how much you’ve had to drink – and how much your so-called mates are egging you on – never, never answer a call of nature on an electric fence..

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    Given that the cows had calves and you had a dog with you that’s more likely a reason for their interest/aggression.

    This +1

    Plus..

    A lot of Cattle have been kept indoors over the winter, it’s only now that they’re being let out for the summer. It’s been a wet and cold winter, mainly wet and the ground has been too sodden to let them out.

    They’re in protective mode for at least another 5-6 weeks until they settle and the calves are grazing on their own.

    Honeslty can’t see why you’d be a “form filler” what’s the point?

    Simple answer is “Don’t go in a field with cows in it”

    Also, it’s only some breeds of Bull that the farmer is required (by law) to post on entry to his field “beware of bulls”

    If in doubt, stay out.

    benman
    Member

    To be fair to the OP, the site in question is on miles of open moorland. You could easily walk/ride a couple of miles before encountering the cattle.

    The cattle could hang out anywhere, but I think they like to loiter by the bottlenecks on trails and intimidate people 😉

    IHN
    Member

    Jesus, 26 posts and no one has yet pointed out the obvious mistake the OP made:

    It’s “My family and I came close to being trampled”

    bobario
    Member

    I’ve had a couple of close encownters over the years. The worst was a couple of years ago just outside Cilcain in North Wales. I’d just entered the field when the whole herd of about 12 to 15 came barrelling over to me and trapped me against the fence. I’d turn and yell at them and they would back away but soon as I turned to go back towards the exit they came at me again. I proper shit meself and I’ve been very wary of cows ever since.

    I went to Holmfirth on Saturday and got halfway across a big field before I noticed there were cows with calves at the far end. One cow and it’s calf were right next to the bridleway and I got to within about 10 feet of them before the calf spotted me and legged it up the hill at a high rate of knots. This spooked it’s mum and for a second I thought it was going to charge me. I ended up saying “good girl, good girl” to it in my calmest voice which did seem to calm it down a bit. I mustn’t have been thinking straight because apparently the best thing to shout is “get awa’ tha’ filthy bugger”. Which I learned from this very forum.

    Some of you lot sound like you’d be better off not going out in the countryside!!

    nick1962
    Member

    You don’t have to be in a field to killed by cattle especially at this time of year. I worked with this poor woman’s husband.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-36079825

    bear-uk
    Member

    I got charged at one night at Christmas. I was out shooting and walking through a field. Recon I spooked them but a really frightening experience as it was pitch black. Thankfully they backed off when I poked one in the eye with a strobing flashlight.

    Premier Icon DavidB
    Subscriber

    You have to laugh at the irony of the fact that cows go for the dog when the thing that actually eats them is holding the lead.

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