Council recommendation …… Speechless

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  • Council recommendation …… Speechless
  • lastuphills
    Member

    Junkyard fair comment it was not 4th hand thought I was there chatting to my mate whilst the tenant relayed he story, my comments are based on her version. What was actually said we will never know … Does that mean we are all discussed out now?

    Anyone else got something else interesting to talk about?

    lastuphills
    Member

    No earnie….my speechless ness was caused by how it was related to me ‘ encouraged…’ To stay without paying.

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    You say encouraged to stay without paying her rent. I say told what the legal situation for her was.

    lastuphills
    Member

    My comments based on the words spoken by the tenant. Your view based on…..?

    RichPenny
    Member

    Taking 5 months or whatever in my view protects the tenant too much to the detriment of the landlord. A council advising a tenant to actively play the system (in my opinion ) is wrong

    Well, the detriment to the tenant is that they lose their home. The landlord will lose money. Our society values shelter above money in the grand scheme of things. Should the landlord lose enough money that he is also at risk of losing his home, the legal system will also protect his fundamental right to shelter at the expense of the bank.

    Btw, you said that you agreed with my example. I am afraid I don’t believe your answer. No-one is going to be handing their keys back to the bank if they couldn’t pay the mortgage for a few months.

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    My comments based on the words spoken by the tenant. Your view based on…..?

    My view is based on what you said :

    she was told it would take months to get her out and hopefully that would give her time to sort things for her and her daughter.

    I can’t see anywhere that she was encouraged to stay without paying her rent. She was, from what you say, told her legal rights.

    Of course if what you have told us is false then that’s a different question altogether. But based on what you’ve said there is nothing to suggest that she was encouraged to stay without paying her rent, she was simply told her rights.

    lastuphills
    Member

    Rich same scenario yes (ish) I don’t really agree with that either in general terms (I’m not talking specific cases or scenarios)

    This response? Which bit do you not believe?

    RichPenny
    Member

    I don’t believe that you’d give your house back to the bank if you were unable to pay the mortgage for a few months.

    Scamper
    Member

    Will you have a credit rating left though?

    lastuphills
    Member

    Well that certainly is one interpretation of my response. 😯

    Earnie yep that is part of what I said.

    lastuphills
    Member

    It certainly was an experience popping back here to the forum after a while away, something’s never change.

    Premier Icon stewartc
    Subscriber

    Being a landlord myself, I am surprised no one has mentioned the many insurance policies out there that can be bought to cover tenants missing payments (yes, not read it all)?
    As with any investment there is risk, though I rent due to the fact I left the UK and there’s no sense in selling due to the poor equity, so landlords should mitigate this risk by taking the relevant precautions, landlord payment protection is one of the those, heck, you can even get the tenant to pay this if required.
    Renting is no different from providing any other service, I provide accommodation with all the amenities and in the condition advertised, I expect my tenants to pay as per the agreed contract, its no different from you not paying for a builder or plumber for their work.
    The insurance policy is there to make sure that if the tenant is not able then this can be resolved, just like I pay housing insurance to insure that my tenant can be housed if something was to happen to my house structural, it is my legal (and I would say moral) obligation since they are paying me for services.

    Junkyard – lazarus
    ignoring the politics and us all just saying whether we are left or right wing that still remains the best advice for that person as it would give her a few mths of not being homeless in order to sort it out

    Morally you/we may disapprove and the person is free to what they like with the advice but it is the best way of avoiding being homeless in the short run.

    I suspect they also mentioned moving in with friends, staying with family and some other choices in order to let the person choose.
    I would say they were doing their job by explaining the options to the customer

    POSTED 10 HOURS AGO #
    “The Customer” ?

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    I am surprised no one has mentioned the many insurance policies out there that can be bought to cover tenants missing payments (yes, not read it all)?

    crankboy did mention it.

    Junkyard
    Member

    “The Customer” ?

    The Point?

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Obviously the tenant owes the landlord money . The debt increases as the tenant remains. That still does not alter the fact that the council advise was spot on and unsurprising.

    Yep, council advise was spot on. We were in the same position a couple of years back. Took months to get the tenant evicted and all we got to show for it was a CCJ for £4.5k which we’ll never see as the tenant has no money. Cost £2k to redecorate the property back to how it was, so it could be re-let. Took another court trip to get our deposit back from the Government scheme and the eviction cost about £1k in solicitor / barrister fees. With hindsight, insurance for non paying tenant / eviction costs would have been a good bet! Still, was a good, if not expensive, learning experience….

    hora
    Member

    Wow so some poor bloke/woman could be out of pocket due to council promoting what effectively is passive-fraudulent.

    Would the same council also let the landlord off his own council tax payments to rebalance/help him out?

    Edric 64
    Member

    Which is what I have been getting at on here ..Why should the landlord get shafted when a rental may be important income to him ?

    Premier Icon Lifer
    Subscriber

    For the person advising the tenant the effect of their advice on anyone other than the tenant is inconsequential.

    Junkyard
    Member

    The tenant asked for advice, not the landlord, hence they got the best advice for them/told what the law is.
    I would imagine had the landlord asked for advice they would have received the appropriate advice for them – ie eviction procedures and the law. they may have even been advised to loiter outside to make sure they can serve papers. Who knows.
    Would a financial adviser speaking to the owner give advice that took into account the tenants needs, of course not. Why would you as they are not the person being advised.

    Would the same council also let the landlord off his own council tax payments to rebalance/help him out?

    No landlord ever paid the council tax when I was a tenant

    Why should the landlord get shafted when a rental may be important income to him ?

    Because that is what the law says has to happen- ie they follow a legal procedure to evict during which time they are unlikely to be paid.
    I am sure the rental payments are important to every landlord but so is having a roof over your head. Faster eviction procedures harm the person in greatest need – ie the person with no money and about to have no house.

    It is also worth noting that

    If you leave your accommodation when you don’t have to, or do not return when you have the right to, it could affect any right you may have to get homelessness help from the council. If possible, try to get advice before leaving.

    Ie to leave without being forced would mean sleeping on the streets with a child. to be evicted means access to emergency help
    It also depends on why you did not pay as well as sometimes this is classed as voluntary homeless.
    I think we all feel for the landlord but if you think the best option for the tenant is to make themselves voluntarily homeless with no access to council help then you are very much mistaken.
    if you dont like the rules I suggest you vent at the law rather than the person who said what the law is.
    If you think the landlords needs are the greatest then you are also mistaken.

    mattsccm
    Member

    Big problem in our country. Lack of fairness i.e. treating people the same.
    We favour the underdog. Not fair.

    Edric 64
    Member

    I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not if they were depriving me of income I needed to live on .You know like pay my bills council tax etc ?

    slowoldgit
    Member

    I was wondering about renting out my property, perhaps for six months. Having read footflaps’ figures, I don’t think I’ll bother.

    Premier Icon Lifer
    Subscriber

    Edric 64 – Member
    I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not if they were depriving me of income I needed to live on .You know like pay my bills council tax etc ?

    As had been said before look at other investments if constant return is that necessary for you.

    Premier Icon MSP
    Subscriber

    Would the same council also let the landlord off his own council tax payments to rebalance/help him out?

    The landlord could quite easily start missing council tax payments while he sorted himself out. The process for the council would take much longer to get any sort of court order against him, than it would take to evict a tenant.

    Which is what I have been getting at on here ..Why should the landlord get shafted when a rental may be important income to him ?

    Well as it appears he his homeless and already renting out at a loss, I am not sure it is possible to give the tenant any advice that may also aid the landlord.

    I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not if they were depriving me of income I needed to live on .You know like pay my bills council tax etc ?

    It is usual for the landlord to obtain financial checks and references on a tenant before entering a rental agreement. Unfortunately for tenants there is no real way of ensuring a landlord isn’t a complete ****.

    Premier Icon Lifer
    Subscriber

    mattsccm – Member
    Big problem in our country. Lack of fairness i.e. treating people the same.
    We favour the underdog. Not fair.

    Yeah! Bloody underdogs 😐

    grum
    Member

    Big problem in our country. Lack of fairness i.e. treating people the same.
    We favour the underdog. Not fair.

    Yes if there’s one thing wrong in this country it’s the way everything is stacked in favour of the underdog.

    In fact you wonder why they’re called the underdog at all, what with all the advantages they enjoy. 😕

    crankboy
    Member

    “I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not if they were depriving me of income I needed to live on .You know like pay my bills council tax etc ?”

    To be honest if this is your position then being a landlord is the wrong business for you. Property and buy to let and any other renting out is an investment and a business it has risks and the value of your investment may go up or down . Defaulting tenants are a known risk which can be managed and indeed insured against in advance.

    We are in enough trouble bailing out bankers without having to bail out amateur landlords who assume that everything will be perfect and they will achieve 100% rental and base their finances on that.

    grum
    Member

    “I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not

    Nice.

    Edric 64
    Member

    It doesnt really matter whether as a landlord you have one property or many does it?If you are losing money through the actions of someone else and unlikely to get it surely you want them out so you can macximize your return .

    The reason for looking at property ,which I hasten to add is well into the future is that currently the return is quite good .I appreciate there will possibly be problems
    As a new landlord why would I need bailing out ? I would be looking at a small cash purchase so no mortgage involved ?

    Premier Icon MSP
    Subscriber

    As a new landlord why would I need bailing out

    Edric 64 – Member

    I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not if they were depriving me of income I needed to live on. You know like pay my bills council tax etc ?

    Unless like the op you want to claim completely random and frequently conflicting scenarios to try and justify your position.

    crankboy
    Member

    Edric64 the answer is in your own post and in hora’s you want a faster eviction so you can maximise your return at the expense of everyone else who has to bare the additional cost of housing the homeless . Hora suggests a rate rebate.

    cheekyboy
    Member

    I suspect the advising council bird/bloke is a card carrying communist hell bent on wrecking the financial stability of all the local capitalist scum landlord/ladies.

    lastuphills
    Member

    Evening MSP has your mum taken the Xbox away….you must be bored.

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    lastuphills – Member
    Evening MSP has your mum taken the Xbox away….you must be bored.

    You need to take this to Dragons Den as “most innovative Internet arguing ever”. Not sure how they’ll make money out of it, but it needs the world to see it.

    Junkyard
    Member

    I couldnt give a shit if they were going to be homeless or not if they were depriving me of income I needed to live on .

    Someone did not get enough hugs as a child.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    I was wondering about renting out my property, perhaps for six months. Having read footflaps’ figures, I don’t think I’ll bother.

    Very much an exceptional case plus we were naive amateurs. Our Barrister turned out to also rent a load of properties and gave us a load of good advice. 1st is get landlord insurance to cover eviction costs (about £150/year), second the minute the tenant is so much as 30seconds late with a rate payment, send them a letter threatening legal action – never be nice, never offer to help them in tough times, go straight to court as soon as you can. We made the mistake of being nice, our tenant fell on hard times so we offered her a rent holiday for a month, the offered to spread her debts over months etc. Big mistake, we just got utterly shafted.

Viewing 37 posts - 81 through 117 (of 117 total)

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