Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • Can I just use any Grease for Bolts?
  • Premier Icon Duggan
    Free Member

    I have a Tacx Neo 2 turbo trainer and its developed a creak. The internet seems to suggest that if I loosen (individually) each bolt on either the drive side or non-drive side and grease and re-tighten, this may solve the issue.

    I know this is a dumb question but the trainer cost me a fortune…does it matter what I grease the bolts with? I have some generic bike grease lying around or aside from that, I have WD40.

    Would these do or should I procure something in particular?

    Thanks in advance for any help. They are hex bolts that seem to hold a huge flywheel part into place in the middle of the plastic body of the trainer, if it makes any difference.

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Full Member

    Any grease, not WD40 or oil.

    Premier Icon stumpy01
    Full Member

    I would contact Tacx in the first instance and ask their advice.

    I had an issue (twice) with my Flow Smart & contacted them via their Facebook page, as this seemed to be the quickest way to get a response.
    They got back to me within 24hrs on both occasions and were really helpful.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    To me it depends. Any grease will do but the correct product is best so a bolt that is critical but is rarely removed loctite, a bolt you remove often grease, a bolt that is going to be in a while coppaslip

    Premier Icon jeffl
    Full Member

    What TJ said but bascially any grease will stop the noise. I have some ancient old Esso axle grease that I stole from my dad about 20 years ago. That’s what I use for general grease.

    Premier Icon Duggan
    Free Member

    Hi all cheers for the replies, useful to know.

    Stumpy- cheers, didn’t realise they had a Facebook page, I’ll try there before I start doing anything.

    Premier Icon dirkpitt74
    Full Member

    What TJ said – use the correct type for the application.

    Premier Icon bigginge
    Full Member

    They are hex bolts that seem to hold a huge flywheel part into place in the middle of the plastic body of the trainer, if it makes any difference.

    Sounds more likely an appropriate thread locking compound would be the thing for the job here, would need to be safe to use with the plastic part though.

    Premier Icon wobbliscott
    Full Member

    Mines just come back from warranty return Tacx flux 2. Went through their website, took a video of me pedalling it so they could hear the should it made and they said it was knackered and needed replacement. it was more of a metallic tink, tink, tink, noise on a once per rev period so not a creak as such. If its still under warranty I’d just return it if I were you. These things seem to fail routinely…not just Tacx ones, know of others with other brands who’ve returned under warranty many times. if its making a noise the chances are it will be knackered soon enough.

    The returned unit has changed alot from the one I sent away…seems Garmin are making real changes to the product hopefully to address the unreliability. The problem is the axel kit that came with the original unit no longer fits the newly designed model so make sure you get a full replacement axel kit if you do send it back.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    But not copaslip. I remember being told by a bike mechanic(Willy Bain) that an electrochemical reaction between the two metals – steel in alloy or ti to ti or ti to steel or something, was yonks ago and i forget but it can actively promote corrosion.

    Castrol grease- as used by a million car mechanics.

    Premier Icon falkirk-mark
    Full Member

    But not copaslip. I remember being told by a bike mechanic(Willy Bain) that an electrochemical reaction between the two metals – steel in alloy

    Are you sure as a lot of people put copperslip on the hub of their alloy wheels (car) to stop the alloy and carbon steel reacting and fusing together.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    I’ve googled this and there are reports on yup ok and no way, so in truth i can only go with what ive been told, but accepting that fact would lead to acting on the side of prudence.
    I think a number here also know W.Bain as one of the best if not highly qualified bike mechanics in the business, I dont know the full facts of how copaslip reacts nor the circumstances which would be present, but with plenty of other anti seize greases out there, I for one would look to them first.

    We know for fact different metals can react with one another.
    Bike mechanics mentioned it, others on other bike and car forums have mentioned it, so again to be prudent, and without needing to go into the full metallurgical properties of how electrical conductivity happens and the properties of that, maybe stick to something without reactive elements.

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Full Member

    I thought the creaking on Neo 2’s is usually caused by the “moving” parts that allow it’s slight side to side flex whilst pedaling? Usually solved with a bit of silicon spray.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    I use coppaslip all the time with two dissimilar metals – ie any bolt into alloy and guess what – I don’t get seized bolts! its a solid part of my routine. any mechanic that says not to use it is daft.

    Disc rotor bolts – coppaslipped and come out when I want. Pedals into alloy cranks, bottle cage bolts.

    Its there to prevent corrosion. I have been using it for decades and have never had a copaslipped bolt corrode and seize. Prevent corrosion and seizing is exactly what it is for

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    I expect you can use any grease for anything, but copaslip wasnt designed as an any grease, it was designed as an anti seize where high temperatures were in play, so in truth wouldnt you agree that its just a case of being used in areas where high temps are not an issue basically because it is grease.
    So I dont think it then possesses magical properties, and it is in fact im sure you’ll also agree here that it is in fact to make the point, being misused 😉

    I expect some use olive oil on their chains, and why not, its a thin oil, ideal for lubricating.

    Premier Icon richmars
    Full Member

    Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals needs the right two metals and a liquid. So the grease, or cupaslip, is there to prevent a liquid causing corrosion.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    Dyna-ti is right though coppaslip is specifically for high temp use to prevent seizing. Its just a bit unnecessary to slop it on elsewhere.

    Premier Icon Frankers
    Full Member

    I use Copaslip and similar Molycote as pastes at work on a daily basis. Some applications are for high temperature and some not. It is not designed solely for HT applications, and I have never witnessed any seized materials. However, I only use it mixed alloy steel parts and sometimes aluminium.

    Premier Icon wobbliscott
    Full Member

    I expect some use olive oil on their chains, and why not, its a thin oil, ideal for lubricating.

    That doesn’t mean thin oil is ideal for lubrication in any situation. Depends on the pressure between the two moving surfaces. If high pressure then with a thin oil the lubricating film will be squeezed out of the way allowing the two moving surfaces to contact.

    Grease or lubricant wont help the OP as suggested. There is no relative movement with a bolt and therefore no way a creak can occur. If it is then its not tightened up enough. You need to identify the two surfaces that are moving and sliding past each other and lubricate there.

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