Viewing 31 posts - 41 through 71 (of 71 total)
  • Am I being unreasonable – tenant, fibre broadband and BT equipment
  • sparkyrhino
    Full Member

    I work for O/R , the 2years blah about copper not been supported is rot, I live in a fibre area ( supposed to be no new copper provides from 07/22 ) guess what!! Lots of people dont want or are not interested in fibre.

    Lots of companys/institutions use powerfail copper back up telemetry lines, most lifts have a power fail copper line for example

    Will keep me busy weaving copper wires until I retire.
    ps the  O/R network has been opened up for other companys to use, they are very carefull and dont damage the excisting network at all 🤣

    thebunk
    Full Member

    Openreach took my copper when they installed fibre. Doesn’t seem like it’s something you or your tenant have much control over 🤷

    sharkbait
    Free Member

    Openreach took my copper when they installed fibre.

    …and left it when they did mine!!

    pk13
    Full Member

    It’s up to the position of the original pole ECT is it safe to climb has the engineer got 7 more jobs on yadda yadda. It’s supposed to be removed around by me and mostly is

    oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    Thanks all just to clarify

    1. My understanding, which may need validating, is that the new install is nothing to do with BT or Open Reach – like Virgin Cable that we have. Completely separate system. Like I say I probably need to check that.
    2. I’m happy for them to install and use what they want, including drilling though walls etc.
    3. I just don’t want the old BT equipment removed (cable cut, master socket etc.) unless there is a good reason to do so – and the only reasons I’m hearing from them is ‘reasons’.

    I need to work on 1.

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    Drac
    Full Member

    1) Are you now talking cable? If not then it’s Open Reach

    2) Cool

    3) I’m waiting on them finalising the connection in my street, the poles have had the fibre wired up just needs connected the cabinet. When I’ve looked at deals all describe the old socket being removed as it’s no longer needed.

    pk13
    Full Member

    If it’s like city fiber (they independently provide round my way) then I believe it’s a separate “exchange,” to open reach not that fiber uses one. They supply Vodafone fiber to the property only. if you choose BT,sky ECT it’s a new line from open reach.
    I see propertys with both city fiber and openreach fttp installed some even have the copper left in.
    If your worried openreach won’t come back and re install if your tennents or new ones want to change back don’t be they will it’s a cut throat industry full of greedy piggy’s

    spooky_b329
    Full Member

    If the new order is from a provider other than Virgin or Openreach, it’s very likely they are renting pole and duct space from Openreach for their own wires, and although I heard it was being considered, they are not allowed to recover BT or Openreach equipment (yet). If it needs removing to facilitate the install, they have to request Openreach to do that part of the work.

    The reason they want to remove the network is normally due to capacity. You can’t just double the number of wires on poles and in ducts over the next decade, poles become overloaded and ducts get congested. It’s also much easier to pull the fibre cable in on the back of the copper, it reduces the likelihood of needing to dig up a pavement or cut loads of branches from your neighbours tree.

    There is no benefit keeping the copper. There will be a reconnection charge whether it’s in situ or needs reinstalling. A lot of exchange areas are under stop-sell status, meaning where fibre is available, the main providers will not sell a new legacy copper service.

    If it’s left in situ, after the fibre switch over is complete, you’d need a massive recovery program as people decided they didn’t want all this old rubbish on/in their houses. That’s a massive own goal as a business.

    squirrelking
    Free Member

    If it’s left in situ, after the fibre switch over is complete, you’d need a massive recovery program as people decided they didn’t want all this old rubbish on/in their houses.

    Like the cable relay wires and boxes that have been stuck to my house and the surrounding properties doing nothing for the past 30 odd years?

    Also when was the last time you needed to make an emergency call in a power cut, I certainly haven’t in the last 35 years.

    Well you have me convinced. We should probably do away with the fire service and coastguard whilst we’re at it, I’ve never needed those either.

    spooky_b329
    Full Member

    Like the cable relay wires and boxes that have been stuck to my house and the surrounding properties doing nothing for the past 30 odd years?

    Exactly. If the company was still operating you’d be able too ask them to remove it. In areas where PIA providers have put their own overhead wires to customers, you’ll notice they now have two wires spanning from the pole and two lots of cables run on they house exterior.

    stumpyjon
    Full Member

    Weve been told no more ADSL lines from the end of this year and ADSL switch off by the end of 2025. It doesnt mean the copper is being ripped out but does mean the equipment in the exchange will be turned off. The new service SEGOE I think is VDSL. Any traditional copper based landline services are going even if the copper line is not. Someone above also made a very good point, most domestic properties have wireless phones that require power for the base station to work so most of us have been in the situation of no power, no phone for a long time.

    Olly
    Free Member

    the BT equipment needs to be removed. I’d prefer they didn’t touch it

    Why?

    nickc
    Full Member

     I just don’t want the old BT equipment removed

    I think there’s an industry-wide move towards removing the copper wire network as new installations are going in. It’s happening, whether you want it or not. May as well get it done.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    If only someone would invent a mobile phone that used some sort of wireless technology, then gave one to pretty much everyone in the country whose age was in double figures.

    That’s a great idea, now if only the masts enabled that wireless communication didn’t also rely on the same electricity grid ……

    My parents got stuck last winter only being able to make calls if they climbed up the hill to get a line of sight to the phone mast in the next valley (which isn’t great when you’re 70 and it’s the kind of weather that results in power cuts). And not just a rural issue either, the masts at J11 on the M4 stop working every time there’s a powercut too.

    It’s not really a complete reason to not go fiber, but that doesn’t make it a non-issue.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    I’m not saying it’s a non-issue. I’m saying that it’s approaching being a non-issue for most domestic installations.

    It’s going to cause murders in some areas of business. We have a lot of legacy equipment out there – PBX phone systems, MFDs (big copiers) – that have built-in phone lines as their only means of remote support. Burglar alarm monitoring, fire systems, many of these sorts of things require a POTS connection. We have printers which automatically fax us with toner reorders, far as I’m aware Fax Over IP is not a thing. And I don’t know as anyone is seriously talking about this stuff.

    But at home? Meh. I can count the number of power cuts I’ve experienced in adulthood which lasted longer than “oh, did we just have a power cut?” on the fingers of one hand, it’s not the 1970s any more. I live in the middle of a small town, not somewhere where my nearest neighbour is miles away. I’m not in my 70s. And if a lot of that weren’t the case and power cuts would be a showstopper then I’d get a UPS; if I lived in the sticks, a backup generator.

    I’ll bet many people on here arguing in favour of paying £20/month for a non-VoIP landline “just in case” don’t even have a phone that would work with it if the power went.

    simon_g
    Full Member

    Openreach left my copper line (although I promptly chopped it off as it went through a door frame I was replacing).

    As said, they may well use it to pull through or support the new fibre, and you’re not likely to be able to order a reactivation on an old copper line anyway. Be grateful you’ve got a tenant happy to deal with the disruption and appointments for fitting, just make sure they get the ONT installed where you want it to go.

    Covid largely killed off any remaining fax at our customers, those that did need it moved over to the digital services like efax, and you can port numbers in to them these days too. Fax over IP definitely is a thing though, T38 has been around for a couple of decades.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    Fax over IP definitely is a thing though, T38 has been around for a couple of decades.

    Ah, OK, I didn’t know that. Cheers. Fax isn’t something I’ve had to deal with in at least 15 years.

    bensales
    Free Member

    1) Are you now talking cable? If not then it’s Open Reach

    Not necessarily. I’m served by BT/OpenReach FTTP but also CityFibre FTTP. The latter have their own completely separate infrastructure and cables.

    There are several others like CityFibre who don’t touch OpenReach infra.

    FWIW when I signed up to BT FTTP, OpenReach just blew the fibre line down the existing duct and gave me a new box on the wall. All the existing BT master socket was left alone.

    trail_rat
    Free Member

    And if a lot of that weren’t the case and power cuts would be a showstopper then I’d get a UPS; if I lived in the sticks, a backup generator.

    Are you some kind of prepper ? 😉

    jonnyboi
    Full Member

    No I just live somewhere where power cuts are reasonably frequent and the above solutions are far more palatable than living with a mass of people.

    sir obviously needs to stop messing, about and get a satellite phone

    pk13
    Full Member

    I’d like to apologize on behalf of my stupid phone changing fibre /fiber.
    Glad I’m not at work.:)

    tjmoore
    Full Member

    While I don’t use the landline because no one else does that I’d call or be called from, I prefer the quality compared to variable dodgy quality mobile signal and constantly asking other person to move to a better location, repeat themselves or be asked likewise.

    Though parents discovered Skype thanks to Covid and that’s way better on the audio than mobile voice, even on a phone. Video is another matter but it keeps them happy.

    Also find my head getting warm with a mobile stuck to it for a long call. Landline and cordless phone is fine (noting, I do have a wired phone just in case, though god knows where it is).

    prettygreenparrot
    Full Member

    it’s not the 1970s any more

    Well, yes and no. There seem to be a few 70s revival activities going on 🤣

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Speaking as a landlord o would say yes you are being unreasonable. Apart from anything else a happy tenant is more likely to look after the property and pay rent on time.

    Your house but his home

    squirrelking
    Free Member

    But at home? Meh. I can count the number of power cuts I’ve experienced in adulthood which lasted longer than “oh, did we just have a power cut?” on the fingers of one hand, it’s not the 1970s any more. I live in the middle of a small town, not somewhere where my nearest neighbour is miles away. I’m not in my 70s. And if a lot of that weren’t the case and power cuts would be a showstopper then I’d get a UPS; if I lived in the sticks, a backup generator.

    I live in a similarly small town and can probably count the months of the year where there hasn’t been a power cut lasting several hours somewhere in town in one hand. Granted most folk have a mobile that will still work but that may not be true for all.

    If you have the means and knowledge to run a UPS then more power to you, most folk in their 70’s probably don’t.

    simon_g
    Full Member

    The early Openreach ONTs were chunky things that had battery backup – I think they still use them if a customer needs power-resilient phone service (medical monitoring, etc).

    Most people I know in their 70s, my parents included, have mobiles though – and both the mobile and the masts have their own batteries to work without power for a while.

    spooky_b329
    Full Member

    but also CityFibre FTTP. The latter have their own completely separate infrastructure and cables.

    They have their own cables and do sometimes put up the odd pole or the last leg of duct from the pavement to your house, but they do use Openreach/BT ducts and poles as much as possible. It’s a race against time for each business as there is not enough space for everyone, some areas have copper plus 3 fibre providers battling for space.

    benpinnick
    Full Member

    Yes. Full fibre requires the old to be removed as it’s no longer needed.

    UNless the exchange doesn’t support voice, in which case like me you will go from copper > Fibre briefly, before ending up with copper & fibre, and then a couple of years later when the exchange is upgraded defunct copper (Still there) and fibre. As hard as I tried they badgered me into submission to have that copper reinstalled too. I don’t think I made a single call on it and probably only received a handful as it was installed badly and the line is horrible. Not that I care.

    Drac
    Full Member

    Yeah, that was a few years ago then. Things have moved on.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    I live in a similarly small town and can probably count the months of the year where there hasn’t been a power cut lasting several hours somewhere in town in one hand.

    🤷‍♂️ Do you live in all of those somewheres?

    Granted most folk have a mobile that will still work but that may not be true for all.

    Of course. I never said it was, I was generalising. There will always be exceptions.

    If you have the means and knowledge to run a UPS then more power to you, most folk in their 70’s probably don’t.

    A basic UPS is box with a plug at one end and a socket at the other, it requires about the same “means and knowledge” as a four-gang.

    oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    So it transpires that my initial assumptions were correct.
    This install is nothing to do with OR/BT
    After a quick call to the tennant, all is good. He can get the fibre into the house without touching the BT cable or equipment.
    Lesson learned about the letting agent getting in the way with chinese whispers!

Viewing 31 posts - 41 through 71 (of 71 total)

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