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  • 4 Season Road Bikes – Metal Based Content…
  • Premier Icon mikehow
    Free Member

    Hi all

    Back for some more collective roadie wisdom.

    Currently own a Canyon Ultimate CF SLX which I bought four years ago after my last carbon bike was getting long in the tooth.

    The bike has served me well with a few bigger events like the Mallorca 312 but if I’m honest I’ve never really clicked with the bike as I have with others, whilst its very balanced it also feels a little lifeless and numb.

    Thinking about my current requirements for a bike its predominantly now about bigger days out – the odd audax every few months and occasional sportives and chain gangs with mates therefore I’m beginning to look away from carbon and more toward something metal based like steel or ti.

    I guess other considerations are to be able to run up to a 28 mm tyre size, discs and perhaps to be able to stick guards on as and when.

    Initial thoughts on options are:
    – Fairlight Strael
    – Mason Resolution
    – Kinesis GTD (V2 – Ti version)
    – Bowman Weald

    Any other ideas?

    Its probably worth mentioning I already own a Kinesis ATR so already have something that can run chunky tyres sizes, so looking for something that will compliment it rather than try to cover lots of bases.

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    Have recently built up a Bowman Weald and I’m loving it so far. It replaced a custom steel chesini that was not ideal as a winter bike as non disk, tight clearances and guards were not a good fit.
    The Weald is a far better ride but despite buying it as a winter bike I have ended up with something far more versatile and intend to ride it a fair bit in the summer too. FWIW my other bike is a Pegoretti so I know what it’s like to ride a bike that’s fully sorted ride quality wise.
    What surprised me most about the Bowman is how it’s not compromised despite being slightly longer wheelbase and wants to ‘go’ like a race bike and has impeccable handling, I doubt you will be disappointed with any of the frames on your list but I wouldn’t swap mine for any of them!
    Here it is in full winter mode:

    Premier Icon oldnpastit
    Full Member

    What’s wrong with Al?

    Also, what are the wheels on your current bike? Heavy or not so heavy?

    Premier Icon mikehow
    Free Member

    That Weald looks lovely!

    Yes I guess I’m over the whole – summer bike/winter bike thing, really I want a decent riding road bike that either has guards on or not depending on conditions.

    I’m probably getting a bit fickle in my old age, if the weather is particularly mucky I’d either go on Zwift or take the Kinesis.

    [EDIT] The Kinesis is an AT rather than ATR [/EDIT]

    In terms of alu as a frame material, I guess I’m completely open to it, I’ve always associated it with being uncomfortable over long distances but certainly open to suggestions.

    Current wheelset is a Mavic Krysium Pro which has never really blown me away when compared to some of the deeper section carbin rims I’ve ridden in the past.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    I have a Mason definition and would say it’s a perfect fit for your intended use.

    Premier Icon mrb123
    Free Member

    Something ti from Reilly?

    Premier Icon kilo
    Full Member

    Custom built Rourke, explain what you want, get the correct tool for the job from craftsmen.

    Premier Icon felltop
    Full Member

    I’ve had a Fairlight Strael for nearly 3 years now. It’s done everything I’ve asked of it – including a 2,100 mile 3 week trip across Europe, Scottish winters, and some frankly absurd loaded riding on Norwegian singletrack. The wise range of frame sizes enabled me to get a near custom fit. Can’t recommend the Strael highly enough!

    Premier Icon intheborders
    Free Member

    TBH I’ve found moving up/down tyre sizes to be the easiest/cheapest way to get more/less comfort.

    On my cheap alloy (cw carbon fork) gravel bike the difference in comfort moving from 36c to 43c (both at 40psi) was considerable.

    Premier Icon akira
    Full Member

    Shand rizello disc, custom geo and they’ll do what you want. Also rides lovely, previous bike was a Cervelo carbon aero thing and it was good but didn’t really sparkle, the Shand is heavier and less aero but feels so much nicer.

    Premier Icon hillsplease
    Full Member

    Sabbath Silk Road (ti (has served me well for 8 years. Spa Cycles in Harrogate have the Sabbaths on a few weeks lead.

    I’ve just drunkenly pre ordered a Sonder Calibri Ultegra in ti. If the frame’s anything like the Broken Road I’ve got it’ll be lovely. Most of the finishing kit and wheels will get upgraded over time, but it’s £2300 all in, so quite modest for ti.

    Premier Icon belugabob
    Free Member

    4 season bike, you say.

    Have you overlooked the Kinesis 4S Disc?
    Will take 30mm tyres comfortably – probably 28mm, with mudguards.
    Capable of (not particularly smooth) canal towpaths along the Kennet and Avon and a gravelly fire-road blast through Savernake forest (although I did pinch-flat on that one)

    Maybe a toss up between that and the RTD

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    Condor Fratello Disc. I had the old QR version and it was lovely to ride.

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    I guess other considerations are to be able to run up to a 28 mm tyre size

    i forgot to add, those are hutchinson storm 28c’s with sks guards. i did take the plastic clip off the front tip of the guard but there is no rubbing and they were not difficult to fit apart from not having a proper blade to cut the stainless stays. i’ll be on 32’s come the summer when the guards come off. wheels are quite wide so the 28c measure 29.9 with my vernier gauge.

    Premier Icon Shred
    Full Member

    I’ve been running a Volagi Liscio for just under 20k miles of riding for this exact purpose. I have been keeping an eye on a possible replacement and have gone in circles about Ti, carbon etc.
    I too want a road bike with 28/30 tire clearance and full mud guard mounts.

    The Cervelo Caledonia fits the bill quite nicely in carbon.
    I was also looking at the Enigma Etape, Kinesis GTD.
    There are some lovely new Al bike out there, and with a good seatpost would be just as comfortable.

    Premier Icon bluebird
    Free Member

    Does it have to be metal? I’ve just done a similar thing. I have a ‘fast’ bike and wanted a good all rounder, winter road bike, gravel bike all year round, occasional bike packing and ended up with a SC stigmata. The Cervelo Caledonia looks like a great all rounder if you want something more road focussed. I’m sure there’ll be other carbon all rounders. I’m not saying don’t go metal, but I wouldn’t rule carbon out.

    Premier Icon benman
    Free Member

    I’ve been riding a Kinesis 4S disc this winter. I looked at the Kinesis GTD but it looked a bit short on reach. The 4S has more classic race bike geometry and has lovely snappy handling.
    Running 28’s with full length guards.

    Before this I had a Carbon Synapse Disc as my winter bike which was slightly lighter, but the geometry was a bit slacker than I liked.

    Both were equally comfortable over long distance. I plan to do Lejog on the 4S this year.

    Premier Icon benman
    Free Member

    I give up trying to share Instagram images…

    Premier Icon soundninjauk
    Full Member

    Based on totally irrational ‘ooh I’d like to have that bike’ feelings when I see them around, I’d go for the Fairlight, Mason or Bowman off that list.

    I actually scratched the Mason itch with a Bokeh at the end of last year and it is a delight to ride. Dealing with Mason themselves was also very straightforward and they were dead helpful with my inane handlebar width queries. I’d definitely buy from them again.

    Premier Icon forked
    Free Member

    I’d avoid cheap titanium – the frames at this price point are heavy, and I’d be concerned by their durability and ride quality.

    Ritchey Road Logic Disc – the non-disc version was superb, I can imagine this version will be just as good.

    Focus Paralane – a real sleeper bike. Granted, it’s not metal, but I thought it was superb, and worth a mention. Loads of tyre clearance, comfortable, relaxed geometry and light.

    Trek Crockett Al – a leftfield option, don’t be put off by the CX marketing, these frames are brilliant for the money, although the prices seem to have gone up for the 2021 model.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    therefore I’m beginning to look away from carbon and more toward something metal based like steel or ti

    Why? I reckon carbon is ideal for winter – no corrosion, as long as you have a carbon post.

    I can’t imagine a better everyday/training/audax bike than my Cube Attain GTC. It’s stiff as hell but really comfortable thanks to the tyres. And the dedicated mudguards are just superb – absolutely zero rattle.

    Premier Icon shedbrewed
    Free Member

    Given that @forked has recommended the Trek Crockett here’s mine.
    Guards
    Bought and used as a spare race CX bike it’s now done the vast bulk of the almost 7000 miles I did last year as a road bike including several 200s.
    But it’s not as pleasant to ride as my Rourke 953 road/best bike which I’ve also done 200s on. Given the option of going down that usage again I’d look at an 853/953 frameset with the ability to fit tyres 28-40mm and guards. I can’t comment on any of the bikes you’ve listed but friends have good things to say about Mason and Fairlight.
    The steel Rourke replaced a Carbon Storck so it was a pretty high bar to match. The Rourke has been better in every way apart from weight but that hasn’t stopped it being faster.

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    The Crockett has cross geometry though with a higher BB, personally i prefer a lower BB for handling on the road. appreciate not everyone will be bothered by that.

    Premier Icon IHN
    Full Member

    Ritchey Road Logic Disc – the non-disc version was superb, I can imagine this version will be just as good.

    Came here to say that.

    Premier Icon forked
    Free Member

    Why? I reckon carbon is ideal for winter – no corrosion, as long as you have a carbon post

    I’m in complete agreement. There’s a lot to be said for a decent steel frame, but they do cost. It’s not just a sticker that makes a good bike. I’ve owned a couple of 853 frames from the cheaper end of the spectrum, and they were not a patch on my old Serotta.

    The Crockett has cross geometry though with a higher BB, personally i prefer a lower BB for handling on the road. appreciate not everyone will be bothered by that.

    The Crockett BB height is in the ballpark of alot of road bikes. It’s certainly not what I’d call cross height, which I’m not sure even exists anymore? Besides, there’s a whole bunch of things that determine handling, not just BB height in isolation.

    Premier Icon mikehow
    Free Member

    Some great info on here already.

    Please don’t get me wrong, I’ve got nothing against carbon at all, in fact I do think it makes for a decent bike over the winter.

    The main reason I’m thinking about a new bike is that my current (happens to be carbon) bike is pretty lifeless.

    The main thing driving me away from carbon bikes is – the lack of mudguard mounts, and the realisation that actually my main riding needs are less about having the absolute lightest bike available but something that is great to ride throughout the seasons whether that be steel, alu, ti or carbon.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    There’s a lot to be said for a decent steel frame, but they do cost.

    My ’96 Thorn Audax (531c) cost me £75 for the frame and fork, about fifteen years ago. I’ve done LEJOG and the Med to the Channel on it, so I reckon I’ve had my money’s worth 😉

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    get a test ride from a dealer.

    Premier Icon mikehow
    Free Member

    If thats the case I’ll pull my old Koga Miyata out of the garage and have done 😉

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