Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • 2 *man, 3/4 season tent reccs please
  • Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    Right so. Sorted for family and ultralight solo camping, I’m after something which will do solo trips in more comfort, can be thrown on the bike or motorbike, and will also do two or three days in the Spanish Pyrenees with my lad. Four season is probably overkill at the moment but wouldn’t like to buy again further down the line so maybe better to not rule that out for now. We are three hours from the Pyrenees so it will see a fair bit of use there.

    I’d rather spend more on something which will go for ten years but am considering everything. The rose tinted specs are wanting me to go for a Force Ten Mk3; tent envy has me lusting after my mate’s Hilleberg Nammatj 2. The smart decision is probably somewhere in between… what ya got?

    Premier Icon jam-bo
    Full Member

    Exped Orion III extreme. Picked it up for a song at the beginning of lockdown.

    Only three nights in so far but one got pretty wild and it performed admirably.

    Not the lightest but they do a II and an ultralight version.

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Full Member

    This might be worth a look

    Might have a wait on your hands to get one!

    Scarp 2

    Premier Icon whitestone
    Free Member

    We have a Vango Spirit 200+ which I don’t think they do any more but they do several very similar models. Plus points: very sturdy as you’d expect from Vango; a massive porch/vestibule – you could put a bike in there; pitches inner and outer as one. Minus points: heavy – 3kg; can be prone to condensation; quite low.

    Our other two man tent is a Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2. Definitely a 3 season rather than 4 due to the mostly mesh inner, i.e. it’s a typical American tent. Plus points: light – with the extra groundsheet it’s only 1.5kg; plenty of head room; two doors so no scrambling over anyone to get out. Minus points: pitches inner first; the material feels very flimsy but it’s held up so far. You can get a “bikepacking” version that basically has shorter pole sections.

    I’ve carried both the above on a bike, well the whole of the Vango since it doesn’t split up easily. Only had the Big Agnes for a couple of years but the Vango is 11 years old but not had much use since we got the BA. There’ll be a limit due to UV degradation but that depends on how much you use it.

    Have a look through the offerings here – https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/tents-shelters-c25/two-person-tents-c26

    In my experience you won’t really need a 4 season tent unless you intend camping somewhere like the Cairngorms in winter, even the 3 season models will stand up to a lot. A solid rather than mesh inner will keep snow out but won’t ventilate as well in summer.

    Premier Icon grum
    Free Member

    The Naturehike Big Agnes Copper spur clone is very good indeed. Called a Star River 2 I think.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    Vango Halo 200 or 300?

    Tough, self-supporting dome with two vestiblues/exits. Can be pitched with inner as one, or flysheet-only for a lightweight option.

    We used it (a Halo 200) for an any-weather weekend getaway for about a decade, including one all-summer pitch. Never a problem. Finally replaced it with a (discontinued) NOS Vango Storm 200+ which is similar. The Halo takes a hammering, and have often spent longer than 3-4 days at a time. Also in nice weather, you can open up both doors and there is plenty of ventilation adjustment to cover 3 seasons. I know the 300 is popular with motorcyclists. Plus a small tarp for a cooking/sit out porch

    Having 2 x exits/vestibules is a big plus in strong weather, just use the leeward/downwind side

    Premier Icon db
    Full Member

    Nallo 2 gt. I have a Nallo 2 which is great but if I was on a motorcycle I think the gt would be worth the extra half kilo as it would give you somewhere to store wet kit/boots/helmet etc

    Premier Icon CraigW
    Free Member

    Alpkit Tetri. Pretty sturdy, semi geodesic design, freestanding if you want. Not exactly lightweight, but can fit it on a pannier rack etc.

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    Really like the Vango Xenon. Just wondering and may be naive here but why is it a third the price of Hilleberg?

    As mentioned, I don’t mind paying more for ten years’ service but I can’t see why the Vango wouldn’t do that.

    Premier Icon P20
    Full Member

    We have a Terra Nova Solar Photon which is properly light/small for bikepacking, but we bought a MSR Hubba Hubba last year and for additional internal space and porch area it’s worth the additional weight/size. Have yet to try it bikepacking

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    A lady camping next to my pal and I in Orkney had to bail out and take her tent down due to wind – was an Alpkit Ordos semi geodesic one. We had normal one pole tents and they were fine?

    She said it had happened a few times before, do maybe avoid those! Wasn’t THAT windy

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    but why is it a third the price of Hilleberg

    RRP is about £400.
    You’re not paying Hilleberg tax.(Although ast time I got wet in a tent it was a Hilleberg….)
    There will be minor details difference, likely that will show up in a decade of use, but IMHO Vango/F10 are putting out some great tents and have good customer service.

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    Thanks for the reccs all. Favouring one of the Vangos if I can get one over here in time to give it some use this month.
    Interesting about the Hillebergs – I’d never heard of them as they don’t appear to be properly imported to Spain but was properly impressed by my mate’s (not sure which model). Yet they seem to have their fair share of crappy reviews.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Spain

    In which case, I would go for a mesh inner. The F10 Xenon is a warmer inner with less venting options, ideal for Scotland where they are designed and made…

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    Yep… hence my original starting point of a Mk3 Force Ten 😂 – our most-used tent is the Mk5 and it’s done subzero to mid-40s last week (obviously from the back of the car) and it just works… but the pack size/weight kills that idea.

    I guess I’m going to need something with an optional mesh inner?

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Macpac Minaret, still a cracking, top-notch tunnel after all these years.

    On Hilleberg, yes, you do pay a bit of a premium – the Santa Cruz of tend brands maybe – but they use ultra high-specced fabrics and components and they’re very well made.

    I like MSR tents generally – I have an Access 1 for ‘winter, but not high mountain’ stuff – but found the end of a Hubba HUbba folded in on me in high winds, the guying point seems to be sat too low. But generally a good brand.

    As far as good value, well made, middle-market tents go, Vango stuff is hard to beat tbh.

    I’ve used a Big Agnes Tiger Wall UL and while it was properly light, it uses very thin fabrics and has a lot of mesh panels on the inner tent. Great when hot, not so good in winter.

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.