50 years of Merida pushbikes

by 14

Who doesn’t love a good ol’ trip down a mountain biking* memory lane, hey? Let’s look back over the last 50 years of Merida…

*okay, the MTBs don’t appear until 1980 but we can’t let that little fact get in the way of some alliteration

Merida: “This year Merida celebrates its golden jubilee. While the challenging times remain, we can’t and don’t want to ignore the fact that we have been around for a long time. You only turn 50 once, so to honour our half a century in the cycling industry, we have created a gallery showing some key ‘milestones’ since Merida was founded in 1972.”

Potted history of Merida

It all started with an infamous sign attached to the workshop door of a bicycle shop in the US, one stating; “we don’t repair poor quality Taiwanese bicycles”. This was seen by engineer Ike Tseng, who was visiting the US at the time, triggering the desire in him to turn this around and improve the reputation of bicycles ‘Made in Taiwan’. 

Ike was a talented engineer and a visionary who had an obsession with quality. It was this obsession that led him to set up a bike factory in 1972, determined to improve the reputation of Taiwanese bicycles and engineering. Merida’s position of controlling its production sets it apart from a lot of its competitors, who rely on third-party production facilities.

Over the years, Merida turned from a factory that offered its production facilities and solutions to other bike brands into a brand in its own right. 

With one of the most advanced production facilities in the world of bicycle production based in Taiwan, paired with a R&D centre in Germany, Merida has been able to produce a huge range of bikes. With everything from kids’ bikes going all the way to World Tour and Mountain Bike World Cup winning race machines.

Merida remains family-run, with Ike Tseng’s son Michael in control of the business.

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  • This topic has 14 replies, 15 voices, and was last updated 4 months ago by wbo.
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • 50 years of Merida pushbikes
  • David Bisset
    Full Member

    The word “pushbike” should be removed from the English language. Bicycle, pedal cycle, bike will do, but never pushbike which is a word used by bicycle haters. My preferred term is riding iron, as in the cry at the start of a ride ” ladies and gentlemen take your riding irons “

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    I own a Merida and can honestly say I couldn’t care less about their corporate history, does anyone really?

    BruceWee
    Full Member

    does anyone really?

    I do.

    multibikestu
    Full Member

    Well you learn something new every day.
    A mate had a No6 when we were kids.
    I never knew it was a Merida.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    What the fuck is a pushbike?

    Saccades
    Free Member

    Didn’t know the story about the sign.

    Nothing about them owning a chunk of specialized or the LRS (I know, licensed from bergwerk)?

    Had loads of meridas over the years, my fav being the Carrera Fury from about 2000, but also have a soft spot for the lrs.

    Jim Trailrider
    Full Member

    How did geometry begin so wrong without someone suggesting “let’s try the complete opposite”? That 1980 MTB, horrendous. Hindsight is truly annoying.

    Rubber_Buccaneer
    Full Member

    How did geometry begin so wrong without someone suggesting “let’s try the complete opposite”?

    Pure chance. Marketing always has to make something ‘more’ from one model year to the next and it was a mere toss of a coin, direction of the wind or whatever that set us all off in the direction of more steeper head angles, more shorter wheelbases, more narrower bars and more faster handling.

    cheekyget
    Free Member

    My 1984 mongoose californian is merida made

    James
    Full Member

    does anyone really?

    I do too. It’s as much part of the history of bikes as who won what when.

    and it was a mere toss of a coin, direction of the wind or whatever that set us all off in the direction of more steeper head angles, more shorter wheelbases, more narrower bars and more faster handling.

    It was the roadies more XCing them what did that. MTBs 1980-1987 were mostly better geometries than all that NORBA XC geometry stuff 1990-1995 imho. At least, closer to where they ended up. I like how the early 80s MTBs looked.

    chrismac
    Full Member

    Was this advert written before or after the freebies in fgf turned up 😁

    olly2097
    Free Member

    I like my “Aldi” bikes as a friend described my Merida in 2014.

    Love my 2021 big trail Aldi bike especially.

    jordan
    Full Member

    When I was a kid we couldn’t wait to get outside and get ont’pushbikes!

    wbo
    Free Member

    Pushbikes is a great word.

    Riding irons is not, is foppish, and reeks of trying to be hipster.

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