Horse riders

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  • Horse riders
  • Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    I’ve also noticed that Northern horse riders seem much more no nonsense and more friendly whilst their southern counterparts tend to behave like they own the bridleways

    can they afford horses in the north?

    GlitterGary
    Member

    It’s because they’re posh.

    Premier Icon wynne
    Subscriber

    They breed them on a council estate in Bradford.

    poly
    Member

    so you’ve spooked their horse, you expect them to get out your way and you wonder why they are rude to you.

    Premier Icon Lummox
    Subscriber

    Rode up a fairly long steep singletrack lane linking some bridleway recently, 30 metres from my peel off point 2 horse riders round the bend, both very polite but without thinking one suggested I should go back down the hill and wait for them to pass as her horse didn’t like bikes. At which point her horse started flipping out, luckily there was a passing point not too far behind me so didn’t mind backtracking. Makes me wonder what would of happened if I’d met them on the peel off bridleway. Think it’s a combination of misunderstanding, increase in recreational cyclists and everyone being passionate about their thing. Her ‘steed’ didn’t use her as an engine though and mine didn’t try and through me off or stomp on her.

    bikebouy
    Member

    I ride in the South Downs and ALL the riders there, whether I’m on my MTB or Roadie, have been/are some of the nicest people enjoying the Land, It’s the walkers, and self rightious ones at that, who are the real belligerent types.
    I’ve seen more out this year too, maybe they’re finally realising what they’re spending thier money on and using it/them rather than letting them paddock out in rugs in Summer..
    You meet some rather good looking Birds too.. Just enjoy from behind for a bit longer..

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    I find horse riders are a bit like people. Some of them are lovely, some of them are real arsoles.

    Like the woman who “demanded” that I “STOP!” because her horse didn’t like bikes. This was on a country lane linking a village with a main road.

    I muttered something about the wisdom of riding a half ton killing machine on a public road if you don’t know how to control it, but I don’t think she heard me, concentrating as she was with trying to hang on to a rearing kicking slobbering spooked beast.

    thomthumb
    Member

    generally find that iff you slow down (or stop) announce your self early (good morning/afternoon) and ask if it’s ok to pass then they are normally very grateful.

    I had a nice chat with a horserider last night. I think too many people (in cars and on bikes) don’t realise or choose to ignore that the horse has a mind of it’s own and may ignore rider input unlike a car/bike.

    Have met a few arses on horses, but i tend to think that they would be an arse in the pub too.

    Dan1502
    Member

    I saw a couple up ahead the other week whilst I was descending quite quickly so immediately started to brake. The trouble was it was wet and my brakes started to squeel like mad. That left me with a dilemmma. Slow down to walking pace and scare the life out of them with the brakes or fly past as wide as I could.

    neninja
    Member

    Not had similar experiences here in the south of County Durham.

    The all seem a friendly bunch who usually say hello with a smile and thank you for giving them a wide berth etc.

    Plus more significantly there are some lovely looking ladies riding locally so it’s always a joy to meet them 😉

    Taff
    Member

    If on the flat or downhill and I’m facing them I tend to either slow right down or come to a stand still but if I’m cycling up a steep hill then I don’t give way. If I’m going in the same direction then I tend to askk ro squeakk the brakes and wait for a repsonse. As with opedestrians if I don’t get a response I’m coming through. Most seem reasomably polite with this so have no issues but have had horse riders saying bridleways aren’t meant for bikes and then me laughing at them irritates them!

    Premier Icon wynne
    Subscriber

    Just recently I’ve noticed there seem to be a lot more of them round our way – and they seem to be getting ruder. I’ll always treat them with respect, slow down a long way behind and call out excuse me so they know I’m there. A few times recently I’ve been stuck behind horses riding two abreast. Though they’ve looked round and seen me they’ve made no attempt to let me get past or even say hello.

    On other occasions I’ve come to a halt when horses are coming towards me and some have reared up. I know horses are pretty much wild animals and have a tendency to do what they want, and that my face is slightly terrifying, but it seems like there’s some poor horse control out there and some downright rudeness too.

    My wife, who used to be a keen horse rider and now enjoys mountain biking, reckons that something has changed. Is it that there are more mtbers out therefore horsey types are getting more militant, or is it that horse riding has become more popular and there are more learners out there?

    Is there a similar horse riding discussion board out there asking the same questions about us?

    I’ve also noticed that Northern horse riders seem much more no nonsense and more friendly whilst their southern counterparts tend to behave like they own the bridleways.

    Just thought I’d ask since I’m thinking of finding the right horsey forum and asking them the same questions. I’d value your views.

    Premier Icon offthebrakes
    Subscriber

    I’m always courteous to horse riders and slow down or stop and give way to them unless they wave me through.

    But it does slightly irritate me when the more antagonistic riders say “Your bike is making my horse nervous”. Judging by the placid, disinterested behaviour of horses I pass in fields, it seems to be having a rider sat on its back that makes most horses nervous.

    Premier Icon wynne
    Subscriber

    Interesting. Maybe I’ve just been unlucky but I’ve met a greater proportion of real snotty riders recently – many more than I used to meet – and I ALWAYS approach cautiously and in a courteous way.

    As to the spooking of horses, one rider recently told me to get off and walk past their horse on quite a wide bridleway. Shouldn’t it really have been the other way round given that I haven’t got massive metal-clad hooves?

    I’m thinking of carrying some coconut shells to disguise the sound of Hope freehub.

    I’ve also noticed that Northern horse riders seem much more no nonsense and more friendly whilst their southern counterparts tend to behave like they own the bridleways

    I find them alright treat them with respect and normally get the same back.

    Rockape63
    Member

    One of my biggest gripes with Horse riders is the way they let their horse walk on the nice flat bit on the side that the walkers use, thus chewing it all up and turning it into mud!

    bigyinn
    Member

    Not a reasonable reply poly, ride a horse per chance?
    I’ve had a horse rider flid out at us for riding on a sustains cycle path, apparently her horse doesn’t like bikes! FFS.
    What also winds me up is horseriders who take their horses up and down steep bridleways in winter and turn them into muddy swamps. Then when dries out they’re pretty much impassible until late summer when they finally smooth out. Surely they could avoid the more easily damaged paths during the winter, just like we would.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    They always seem ok to me. I used to ride when i was young (friends had horses) so I understand that if you say hi from a distance and don’t spook them, they’re fine.

    If they say ‘the horse doesn’t like bikes’ that’s BS – what it means is ‘i prefer to use this as an excuse to inconvenience you / make sure you slow down or get off’. Any horse that’s ok to go on public roads is fine with bikes as long as you don’t appear out of nowhere silently. If not, they shouldn’t be out there, but i’m not aware of riders taking wild horses out very often )

    “But it does slightly irritate me when the more antagonistic riders say “Your bike is making my horse nervous”. Judging by the placid, disinterested behaviour of horses I pass in fields, it seems to be having a rider sat on its back that makes most horses nervous. “

    That is a good point.. not thought of it that way. Blaming the bike for poor rider / horse relationship perhaps? There are riders who don’t like bikes just like some walkers don’t. Generally the unreasonable people out there are a minority in all walks of life.

    Premier Icon phil56
    Subscriber

    We gets lots of horses on the bridleways we ride in the East Midlands, loads of hunts and equestrian events in the area. I rarely have a problem and go out of my way to be polite, holding open gates and the like. You get the odd snotty one, but I think they are snotty full stop, rather than snotty to bikes.
    Always worth remembering that horse riders are at a significant disadvantage when it comes to control – that 1200 pound thing they are sat on can be very unpredictable, and some of the ones we see are scarily tall! If a rider says ‘their horse is nervous’ often what they mean is that they are getting nervous! Either way, it’s in your interest to not freak the horse – if it does bolt or throw the rider you could find your ride being spoiled by a real emergency.

    MrSalmon
    Member

    There were loads of them around when I was out on my road bike at the weekend- seemed to be about a month’s worth in one ride. All fine though, a bit of courtesy and respect from both sides and there’s no problem.

    Although I have encountered the ones who seem to demand respect from other road users but don’t seem to think they have to return it. That’s not unique to horse riders though.

    monkeychild
    Member

    I think the whole my horse doesnt like bikes thing is laughable. If you dont have it under control, it shouldnt be on the public highway.

    Zoolander
    Member

    never had a problem with horse riders, always seem quite friendly. Even though horses dont seem to like a noisy hope hub too much, I pedal as much as possible near horses since finding that out. walkers on the other hand….

    poly
    Member

    bigyinn, no I’ve never ridden a horse in my life.

    I can’t really see what I wrote that you find is “unreasonable”…

    Or do you think that cyclists should have exclusive rights to the trails you ride? If you replace the horse riders with a couple of cyclists and the bike with a car – then the general consensus would be that the car driver is an impatient **** with no respect for fellow road users.

    slowoldgit
    Member

    Let’s be careful out there.

    A few years ago in my part of Wessex a bike rider was killed by a horse, I think it was on a country road. A horse rider once explained to me that horses are happier if a nearby bike rider says a few words: the horse then realises it’s a human not an alien monster. I guess they can live on a knife edge of fight or flee.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    “A horse rider once explained to me that horses are happier if a nearby bike rider says a few words”

    Exactly. A friendly hello from a way back, moving slowly stops them being spooked. Easy.

    All this while remembering that bridleways are there because of the country’s history of horse use. And like it or not, the pro-horse lobby will always be stronger than the pro-MTB. Let’s all play nicely )

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Subscriber

    wynne – Member
    Interesting. Maybe I’ve just been unlucky but I’ve met a greater proportion of real snotty riders recently – many more than I used to meet – and I ALWAYS approach cautiously and in a courteous way.

    I have a theory.

    It’s summertime, it’s been good weather for a while. It’s astonishing how many people come out of hibernation at this time of year and suddenly remember that they used to do an activity in ‘the outdoors’. They then go and dust off their kit/horse/dog/trainers/surfboard/MTB, do it, behave like an idiot, then they pack away their gear until next year and repeat. People who rarely use ‘the outdoors’ don’t really get any sort of etiquette because they so rarely need it.

    It happens on MTBs, I do it on a surfboard (twice a year surfer, me!) and I do wonder where so many dogwalkers spring from when they don’t walk their dogs during the winter.

    Summertime!

    An irritation I have on the local trails here (Eastern USA), most riders are fine, but some see the “no horses” sign as a challenge. Just yesterday I found huge hoof prints up a section of singletrack we built last autumn. It was made narrow as it’s a shared-use – hiking/biking trail. Horses don’t like to be on the hillside edge, so will move out a foot or two, right into the soft shoulder of the trail – destroying it in places. I find it hard to treat a user group with respect when some of them have disregard for the sustainability of the trails.

    In general though, most of the riders stick to the wider trails, and there are so many cut-offs that it’s easier to divert and ride around them then try to pass them. And all the riders I’ve spoken to have been very friendly, but as a group we always get off the bikes, and talk to the riders/horses.

    But if I ever catch horse riders on the “no horses” trails it’d be a different story…

    winterfold
    Member

    The ones in the Surrey Hills all seem fine, and as another poster pointed out, a reasonable chance of them being considerably more attractive than yer average MTBer so why grumble.

    A bit more tricky when you are on the road bike though as you can freak them out, especially if overtake at speed without a warning, and the simple situation is that if you get kicked you could very easily be dead and if the rider falls that can be very nasty too.

    So… caveat emptor, not much point getting all Socialist Worker about it.

    Save your energy for militant red socks…

    It’s very horsey where I live and if i’m out on the road and come across them I just usually say a polite “cyclist behind” and when they acknowledge I go past wide and steady. On every occasion they have said thanks.

    Mikkel
    Member

    I have also met horse riders with horses that didn’t like bikes.
    The rider was very polite about it and asked if we could please talk to let the horse know it was more than an evil bike it was passing.

    No problem with that, but if i had a horse and was riding it on public paths, i would train the creature to not be scared of things like bikes, cars etc

    Actually don’t think i have come across horse riders being rude, i think they usually know that they are the one in trouble if the horse starts doing stupid things.

    69er
    Member

    No problem with that, but if i had a horse and was riding it on public paths, i would train the creature to not be scared of things like bikes, cars etc

    Truly inspired, my Mrs is pissing her pants at your amazing logic. You don’t have horses do you?

    …the police manage to train their horses to work in riots…?

    SiB
    Member

    There’s something about a woman in jodhpurs that makes me act on my best behaviour and have a friendly hello/chat with them…….and why are so many female horse riders attractive? It’s a great combination with jodhpurs

    Premier Icon oldagedpredator
    Subscriber

    For me its less about the riders and more about what is done in there name. British Horse Society bridleway booklet is currently putting 5m clear width as a good idea for bridleways this doesnt really fit with either sympathtic design or interesting mountain biking. Although there put forward as suggestion and it should be horses for courses what probably will happen is someone will take it as 5m surfaced width and build it.

    As for horses on trail or roads I do slow down for horses. If I’m on the bike I’ll say hello, most times you get a response. I’ve posted this before…

    Bikes dont have personalities horses do and the one sitting on top may not be the one in charge.

    Although the later may also apply to mountain bikes.

    redthunder
    Member

    The Emma’s make it worth it though 😉

    Premier Icon MartynS
    Subscriber

    I’ll always slow right down, and ask the riders if its ok to pass the horse. I had an incident years ago where the rider said it was fine to go round them but as I passed really slowly the horse bucked her off. She was fine, if a bit shaken. I’ve had only one rider who didn’t want me anywhere near her horse because it was really scared of bikes. She wasn’t to happy when I pointed out that if the horse was that jumpy it really shouldn’t be out on a public track.

    I am up north though so Horses are nicer up here..!

    Ho hum
    Member

    monkeychild – Member
    I think the whole my horse doesnt like bikes thing is laughable. If you dont have it under control, it shouldnt be on the public highway.

    A bit like dogs, eh?

    😛

    On the plus side…

    Gently bouncing chicks in jodphurs.

    Better than a fat bloke in Lycra.

    swamp_boy
    Member

    Round here they are nearly all hobby riders out for a gentle walk rather than serious horse people, but 99% are fine as long as you ride like a grown up. One notable exception does get really worked up as soon as a bike appears and you can see her panic rubbing off on the poor horse.

    We have more in common than you might think, stopped for a chat with one the other day and ended up exchanging notes about local cheeky trails – its much harder to avoid farmers when you’re on a horse.

    Inadvertently scared the crap out of one a while back, but I think it was the yellow and black striped top making me look like the a 15 stone wasp.

    nixon_fiend
    Member

    Women on horses hot? God no! They are look like podgy, arse-faced posh-brats to me.

    Judging by my Ex-Gf and all her friends at the equine college, they are.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 48 total)

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