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  • Child stealing from home and covert CCTV / spy gadgets – any tips?
  • bikebouy
    Free Member

    I don’t have kids, but Shirley confrontation is the only clear way of either getting the kid to fess up or deny then you can move on with a clear knowledge base.

    The subdifuge of setting cameras up is simply setting yourself up for mistrusting your daughter, and then finger wag proving it, or not as the case maybe.

    Explaining to her that stuffs gone missing, make it clear she’s under suspicion and let her come clean either way..

    Clear communication, no subdifuge, no back handed behind the scenes traps.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @ cougar – The insurers offered £1500 (Full replacement cost) in vouchers that can be redeemed at accredited jewellers or £900 ish in cash (Purchase price). But yes they were quick. We’ll pay for it in higher premiums eventually, i guess.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    I don’t have kids, but Shirley confrontation is the only clear way of either getting the kid to fess up or deny then you can move on with a clear knowledge base.

    Did you read the thread, including whether he’s already done this?

    Yes. On several occasions, and she absolutely flatly denies it to my face. I don’t want to have to resort to searching her bags every time she leaves the house.

    binners
    Full Member

    bikebouy – Member

    I don’t have kids, ….

    No shit? I’d never have guessed 😆

    I agree with you about the cameras, but any situation like this, with a hormonal teenage girl, needs to be handled with a degree of sensitivity that a UN negotiator in the Middle East would be familar with. And similarly explosive consequences if it isn’t

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @bikebouy, I take your point. Cheers.

    @doosuk – I’ll try pawn brokers, but, fact is we’re not out of pocket (aside from the sentimental value) – it’s the wider trust and engagement issues that are the difficult.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @doosuk – and if I want to watch porn, i’ll get some decent stuff, thanks! lol 😐

    Cougar
    Full Member

    I’ll try pawn brokers, but, fact is we’re not out of pocket (aside from the sentimental value) – it’s the wider trust and engagement issues that are the difficult.

    “Hi, do you remember who brought this in?”

    4130s0ul
    Free Member

    It may be that as your ex still feels spurned or hurt by the break up and that your daughter lives part time with her, that your daughter is hearing / living with the negativity towards your wife / new family. that along with the fact that she may feel as though you/ your new wife is to blame for breaking up the original family unit and she is therefore lashing out at the parties she feels are responsible.

    I would agree with a safe to keep items secure but do not mention it to your daughter.

    hopefully over time and through experience she will come to understand the new dynamic and come to terms with it. though obviously if your ex is still bitter about it, it won’t make things easy.

    I hope whatever path you choose, everything works out for you

    dooosuk
    Free Member

    @doosuk – I’ll try pawn brokers, but, fact is we’re not out of pocket (aside from the sentimental value)

    My point was that if a teenager has taken them, the only place they’re likely to get shot is at a pawn brokers (unless they know some dodgy people through school/college).

    Just sounded like you’re new wife would prefer the ear rings back to the money in the pocket.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @doosuk, yes, that is true, but we’re not holding out too much hope for that

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @4130s0ul – Yes, and thank you – I’ve considered exactly that and there are probably a large amount of those issues at play, despite our best efforts at inclusivity. Thanks for a highly perceptive and gentle response. 🙂

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @PerchPanther – Dammit! I wish I’d thought of that!

    yorkshire89
    Free Member

    Definately try the pawn brokers. I’d imagine if they were pawned then ID would have been taken at the time?

    PaulGillespie
    Free Member

    Very difficult situation… I think you absolutely need to know what’s happening, just now you’re 99% convinced your daughter is stealing but what if she’s not? without evidence you;ll forever think she was. I’d get CCTV put in a few rooms where valuables are kept, not her bedroom, bathroom or kitchen etc. Only rooms where cash and jewellery are kept. That way you can say that you didn’t suspect her of stealing but you thought it might have been a neighbour/tradesman etc etc

    If you do catch her in the act, approach her about it in a calm manner and not in an accusatory/aggressive manner (doesn’t sound like you will) and try to discuss why she’s doing it. It could be out of spite, she may be in trouble and need money or maybe she has problems that she needs professional help with. I’m guessing she’ll get defensive and fly off the handle, put things back on you, then run out the house for some space…keep calm, let her cool off after a few hours/days and gently broach the subject again until she will talk about it. Don’t let it turn into an argument and let her talk to you about it when she’s ready.

    By getting to this stage, you’ll know for sure and you can start to rebuild the relationship based on a little honesty hopefully.

    Good luck!

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @cougar
    @yorkshire99

    Yup, thank you, pawn brokers & market stalls now a top priority.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @ PaulGillespie – Fantastic advice. Thank you very much for taking the time to respond, Paul! I think that taking route that was my gut inclination.

    N.B. Without wanting to be too ‘sucky’; I’m always amazed at the breadth of knowledge and kindness of spirit that is exhibited on this forum! Cheers all!

    outofbreath
    Free Member

    The earings sound like an outlier and the stuff going missing is low value, and much of it could just be lost.

    Lipstick theft sounds much more like “helping yourself to hotel towels” level of criminality.

    So I’d go with the earlier suggestion. Lock high value portable stuff away and forget it.

    She’s had a lot of sh1t in her life, don’t give her more.

    If you go down the surveillance route you don’t need to tell her you know and why.

    CharlieMungus
    Free Member

    Get a time lapse camera instead, it looks less intrusive and you can use it for sunrises and plants’ growing and all sorts of other legit reasons. Then you can just leave it on a shelf near some valuables, either it will be a deterrent or you can actually use it. The problem is that once you have proof, you will one day state it, out of pure frustration if nothing else

    Ming the Merciless
    Free Member

    Build a new patio and see if the problem stops?

    binners
    Full Member

    Please, please don’t put your teenage daughter under any form of CCTV surveillance.

    I fear that if you do that, and she finds out, then regardless of the outcome of your ‘investigation’ it will pail into insignificance next to the fall out from that.

    You could genuinely do irreparable damage to your relationship. Put yourself in her shoes. Would you trust anyone again who’d done that? Or would you feel the trust was completely gone, and bitter and resentful at the invasion of your privacy?

    Think about it…..

    CharlieMungus
    Free Member

    you could start stealing her stuff…

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @outofbreath – Yes, you’re right about the ‘hotel towels’ scenario, and whilst it is frustrating, it’s not the end of the world.

    And yes, she has had plenty to deal with at her tender age in addition to the familial separation (T1 diabetes, recent split from her boyfriend, change of school owing to boyfriend split, etc.) it’s difficult to forgive and forget when the suspicion/distrust is gnawing away in the background. I / we (my wife and I) try our utmost to provide a warm, stable and supportive home, loving family life and sanctuary from the often emotionally manipulative environment which she inhabits when she is with her mother/my ex. Again, that is why the situation is delicate, and I have sought the wider perspective and wisdom of the good folk on STW.

    There’s a lot going on, and the thievery, as pointed out by several contributors here, might just be a manifestation of her situation and something that she can control?

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @binners – oh, believe you me, i’ve been thinking about very little else. Wise words, though; the trust might be broken one way, and she already knows it to an extent. What would be the gain of breaking the trust both ways? I hear you, I hear you.

    hels
    Free Member

    Did I read that right – you let her change schools because she split up with her boyfriend ?? Wow.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @chaliemungus – Steal her stuff? hadn’t thought of that! I’m not sure it’s a solution, but it might be satisfying. 😯

    @Ming_The_Merciless – That’s quite dark . . . 😯

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @hels – No, you didn’t read that right – She changed schools as she was starting sixth form, and her existing school does not have a very good reputation for A level results, so she has joined the other local larger sixth form, which offers a wider range of A’s and a a very many of her closest friends attend there. It happened to coincide with her boyfriend dumping her after two years on the first day of term. Had they not split she probs would have stayed, but as it is, academically and socially it’s a far richer environment.

    It wasn’t an unconsidered, nor undiscussed, choice.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    Sounds like she has some serious crap going on, or at least it might feel like everything is stuffed up from her perspective. If you slam the door on your relationship through having some massive blow-up over surveillance and trust you might just seriously regret it down the line.

    it’s difficult to forgive and forget when the suspicion/distrust is gnawing away in the background

    Don’t worry about forgiving her at the moment, just don’t do anything you won’t be able to forgive yourself for at a later date.

    binners
    Full Member

    Its not easy this parenting lark, is it? The best of luck with resolving it. Its a really really difficult situation

    it may just be a blip though.

    We could all do with remembering what it was like to be that age. Its stressful, and confusing. You’re trying to find out who you are, and pushing the boundries a bit. I know me and my mates ended up getting up to stuff we shouldn’t. Bunking off school, Shoplifting, drinking, graffiti (the big stuff, not scrawling on bus seats). Some (not me) went further and were robbing cars, and dealing drugs, n stuff.

    Its part of growing up. Try not to get too wrapped up in it. I know its not easy. It passes

    Our kid was always in trouble. She was a bloody nightmare. She’s now on the board of a FTSE 100 company

    Best of luck fella!

    bodgy
    Full Member

    Thanks Martin. Truly good advice. Cheers mate.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @binners – Cheers, buddy! And, no it’s not straight forward at any point.

    clodhopper
    Free Member

    “boutros boutros ghali”

    😆

    Sorry. Unhelpful.

    Re covert video surveillance: Use such a tactic, and your daughter may never trust you again. Plus you’ll open yourself up to all sorts of potential nastiness if she decided to turn that against you for any reason. Would you be prepared to face certain allegations, if you had a major falling out and she decided to punish you? Teenagers can be extremely vicious and psychopathic, when vengeful. And it could cause scars that may never heal.

    I’d be thinking about leaving a note in a place she’d be likely to look if she were stealing from you; something like ‘sorry, nothing for you to steal here, would be nice if you replaced those family heirlooms’ or whatever. She’d then know you were onto her, if she were stealing, and if she brought it up, she’d be admitting her ‘crimes’. Might make her rethink her actions a bit.

    I dunno. Just an idea. Don’t **** put covert video cameras up though, for **** sake.

    I don’t have kids. Thank god.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    PS

    Her Type 1 – how well is it controlled at the moment? Is it possible that control may be getting a bit shaky, exacerbating mood problems?

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @clodhopper – Sound advice, thank you. And the note idea is BRILLIANT!! We’ve already had the ‘Our bedroom is out of bounds’ conversation, and the ‘if you want to borrow something just ask’ conversation. I might have to place a note or two just for the hell of it! Great suggestion, cheers!

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @martin – yes, I’d wondered about that. She’s on a continuous glucose monitor , which has really helped in her understanding of her BSL patterns. I’ll endeavour to attend her next meeting with her T1 consultant.

    The whole T1/teenage arena is a forum unto itself. We do all we can to encourage healthy eating and life-style choices, only to find Haribo wrappers stuffed down the back of her mattress etc. Fr1ck1n’ nightmare, tbh.

    almightydutch
    Free Member

    On the possibility she has done this, does she have anything to show for it?

    I would expect something along the lines of a new phone, shoes, handbag, clothes and I’d also expect said item(s) to be of a higher value than usual.

    I don’t want to pry into your finances but do you feel like her peers have access to more ‘cash’ then her? This can be such a cruel situation at her age as she may feel compelled to keep up with current trends etc and if she isn’t as flush as her friends then maybe its a way of obtaining such.(This is mainly on the earings, but even clothes not worn by her before can be seen as a new addition and her peers may ask about it, where she got it from etc and suddenly she fits in again, or at least feels like she does)

    I feel for you and I wish there was a quick and simple solution. Best of luck in whatever direction you choose to deal with this.

    zanelad
    Free Member

    Does she bring anyone home with her. Our daughter’s friend was stealing from us. He’d visit with her and pop upstairs to use the loo and nick something while he was alone.

    If it definitely is her, just don’t invite her home for a while. Make it clear you don’t believe her and point out that it’s odd that nothing’s gone missing since she stopped visiting.

    **** upsetting her, she seems to care little for you. Should you do nothing and have her strip the home?

    bodgy
    Full Member

    Those are very good points, almightydutch. I mentioned earlier in the thread, whilst I’m confident that she’s not into drugs, clothing and accessories ARE very much her thing. It’s tricky to gauge as she spends her time between two homes, and communication with her mother isn’t great. I don’t think she would be so stupid to start flashing the bling around us if she had have stolen from our home. That said, I’ll keep an eye on it, and talk to the ex.

    Thanks almighty dutch.

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    Bunking off school, Shoplifting, drinking, graffiti (the big stuff, not scrawling on bus seats). Some (not me) went further and were robbing cars, and dealing drugs, n stuff.

    Probably shouldn’t admit this, but I used to ‘borrow’ my parents car and go for a drive! Not had any driving lessons, not insured, only 16/17.

    Looking back it was madness, but at the time I just liked driving.

    They never knew anything of it though.

    clodhopper
    Free Member

    “@clodhopper – Sound advice, thank you. And the note idea is BRILLIANT!!”

    Thanks. I dare say some grumpy sod will be along presently to tell me how my advice isn’t wanted, and that the note idea is just me trying to ram my ideology down people’s throats, or some other such nonsense. 😀

    Sometimes, passive/agressive is the way to go. But I think it’s very dangerous to ‘criminalise’ a child, because then there’s always that trust issue to deal with. With prevention being better than the cure, maybe lock away all other valuables in a secret place (yes, I’m aware how good kids are at finding stuff). Set things up so that disturbing them will definitely show.

    I once put up a note in the (empty) cups cupboard of a shared place I lived in, many years ago; ‘no, of course there’s no clean cups, because you never **** wash any up you lazy ****, now go and look in your bed’.

    Worked. 8)

    The beer in the fridge theft wasn’t dealt with so gently.

    bodgy
    Full Member

    @zanelad – Sorry to hear that – they can be such sly little buggers. How did you find out?

    I can’t categorically say that it is 100% her, there’s always a degree of self doubt and or reluctance to believe it. And building a portfolio of suspicion isn’t helping. That’s what I found tempting about the covert cctv route, if i’m honest; un-contravenable evidence.

    But not sure that that’s for the best.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 212 total)

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