Trek Launches Fetch+ Range Of Electric Cargo Bikes

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It’s got to be seen as A Good Thing when a big bike manufacturer starts making cargo bikes. These are straight up car alternatives, and bringing them out of the world of niche enthusiasts or committed eco-warriors will place them in full view of the general public. The easier it is to find and buy a cargo bike, the more normal it will seem. The more normal it seems, the more people will do it. The more people do it, the more bikes there are on the road, and the more other people will join them. So, what is Trek bringing to the cargo bike party?

There’s a ‘longtail’ cargo bike, plus a ‘bucket style’ cargo bike. They’re very much focussed on kid carrying, with a lot of practical considerations given to how you carry kids plus school bags, or supermarket shopping.

Fetch+ 2

  • Price: £4500

The Fetch+ 2 is the longtail bike. You can carry two children on the back, and Trek has developed a range of optional plastic panniers for the front and rear. These allow you carry shopping, but the rear ones also act as a place to keep your kids’ legs tucked in and out of the way. There are drainage holes, so you can rinse out any sticky after school snack spills. The Fetch+ 2 is equipped with the Powertube 500 battery.

Fetch+ 4

  • Price: £7200

The Fetch+4 will carry up to five kids, four in the bucket, and one if you put a seat on the back. The bike comes with two reclining seats in the front as standard, with harnesses, and you can add extra seats if you need them. There’s a big rain cover for the front bucket, making it an all weather transport option (at least for the kids – you’re on your own while pedalling!). The Fetch+ 4 is equipped with the Powertube 750 battery.

Both bikes use the new Bosch SmartSystem and CargoLine motor, giving 85Nm of torque. There are four modes, that includes a top ‘cargo’ mode designed to assist with heavy loads, even on steeper climbs. You can adjust the settings using the Flow App, and check your remaining range, plus a load of other features. There’s also a touch of extra theft protection, which will disable your ebike when your phone is not within range of the bike. It also contains a motion detector that will sound an alarm if the bike is being moved a lot, as well as sending a message to your phone. There’s also a function to prevent your bike from rolling backwards.

Both bikes come in a one size fits most, but the Fetch+ 4 comes with a dropper post – a feature we added to our Benno cargo bike during testing, as it makes swapping between riders nice and easy, and also adds stability when starting and stopping with a heavy load.

We’re hoping to get the Fetch+ 2 in to test, so we can see how it compares to Benno we had. Price wise, it looks like both will bring a decent competitor to the market. These will be available through a host of Trek dealers across the country, who offer financing through Klarna and Santander. You’d probably be looking for finance for a car, so for many it’s an important consideration when buying a cargo bike. Hopefully this launch will see a few more bikes like these at the school gates.

While you’re here…

https://singletrackworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/how-many-miles-to-ride-to-make-your-bike-carbon-neutral/
https://singletrackworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/from-enduro-to-e-cargo-a-new-perspective-on-2-wheels/

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Home Forums Trek Launches Fetch+ Range Of Electric Cargo Bikes

Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)
  • Trek Launches Fetch+ Range Of Electric Cargo Bikes
  • ahsat
    Full Member

    That 2+ looks like a strong competitor to the Tern GSD (though without a belt drive option). Very interesting seeing things coming from the mass market. Hopefully change is slowly afoot.

    1
    chakaping
    Full Member

    Looks great, but I’m very disappointed not to find a single Mean Girls reference in the article.

    mtbfix
    Full Member

    Nice to see this sort of thing coming to the volume manufacturers, but they’re still very expensive compared to some of the stuff out there. Do Tern have a patent for the stands on the back of the racks that let you stand the bike on its tail. That space saving must be a real benefit of you lack a garage.

    vinnyeh
    Full Member

    As a noob to eebs…. how does assistance work on these- is it proportional to effort, or is the full power for the assistance level provided as soon as you start a pedal stroke? I’m guessing that pedalling doesn’t really do. much, is this correct?

    crazy-legs
    Full Member

    As a noob to eebs…. how does assistance work on these- is it proportional to effort, or is the full power for the assistance level provided as soon as you start a pedal stroke? I’m guessing that pedalling doesn’t really do. much, is this correct?

    I ride a Tern GSD pretty regularly (it’s not mine, it’s a community bike, I’m one of the delivery riders).
    The Bosch mid-motor gives 400% assistance (up to 15.5mph) so it’s pretty effortless. Never ridden the Trek but the Tern weighs about 35kg and on full turbo mode, it’ll leave road bikes for dead uphill, even with a load on board.

    The solid “bucket style” panniers on the Trek look good – much as I love the Tern, the canvas panniers are sometimes a bit of a pain to cinch down properly, they need careful loading so as not to bulge awkwardly. Specialized have similar solid plastic “panniers” on their Vado range of e-bikes.

    5lab
    Full Member

    Ergh duplicate posts

    5lab
    Full Member

    The 4 looks nice but is really expensive. My cabby was £1500 new 4 years ago and has a pretty similar basic featureset (Inc rain cover) apart from the electric assist. The geo looks like it’s going to be iffy for taller riders too, with the difference between seat and “head” angle meaning you’ll be really stretched out

    Zero chance of you getting 4 school sized kids in a bucket either, maybe 2 year olds at max.

    csb
    Free Member

    As per my recent thread on electic mopeds as a way of ferrying kids in a city, even the Trek reps acknowledge these are diabolically expensive. No way 4 kids fit in that bucket.

    Edit. The pricing is based on salary sacrifice making it palatable.

    bikesandboots
    Full Member

    As attractive as full power with minimal effort might sound, I guess % assist based delivery is necessary to keep it controllable.

    ahsat
    Full Member

    Edit. The pricing is based on salary sacrifice making it palatable.

    Though as we recently discovered when buying our Tern, both of us had a £3k cycle scheme limit! So for many it might not help.

    bigrich
    Full Member

    They look like wonderful bicycles.

    chevychase
    Free Member

    100% behind e-cargo bikes. This is what the tech should really be getting pushed for. Great stuff.

    benp1
    Full Member

    I like the look of that 2+. The extras are often hidden costs when you look, you don’t realise what you do and don’t get so by the time you spec it to be a practical form of transport (mudguards, bags, stand etc) the price can go up for a few hundred

    The more cargo bikes the better, they really are a fantastic form of transport

    tthew
    Full Member

    Nice, but yeah they do seem expensive. Raleigh do a box bike for £3400 which has a Bosch Cargo motor and reviews well. Battery is a little smaller, but heck, you could buy a whole second one and still have a enough left over for locks and accessories!

    MrAgreeable
    Full Member

    I don’t want to be that guy, but the Raleigh is £4,400 and two seats for it will set you back another £200.

    MrAgreeable
    Full Member

    Not to be That Guy, but the Raleigh is £4,400 and two child seats for it will set you back another £200. It’s cheaper (Raleigh and Babboe are owned by the same parent company) but it’s not half the price.

    tthew
    Full Member

    How odd, so it is. I wonder if I was looking at a cached page earlier. Well £2800 is still a truck load of change.

    MrAgreeable
    Full Member

    A Raleigh stride is £4,400 and two child seats will set you back another £200. Not as expensive but not half the price either…

    thepodge
    Free Member

    The Raleigh also has a very poor reputation, lots of reports of cracked frames is you hunt about.

    mattbeaumont
    Full Member

    Great to see more options becoming available. I love my R&M Load 75. Hardly used the car for local trips since i bought it.

    MrAgreeable
    Full Member

    Yep, it is

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