Young people and American accents

Home Forum Chat Forum Young people and American accents

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 55 total)
  • Young people and American accents
  • Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLZp3PshKM8[/video]

    mt
    Member

    You ride a mountain bike and are concerned about USA culture. Are a fan of Hollywood fils or do you just like Ealing comedies? πŸ™‚

    whats an ’emo type’?

    paddy0091
    Member

    Sounds like every other conversation on Uni of Nottingham campus, like, literally.

    cheekyboy
    Member

    As a kid I always wanted to talk like Steve Austin !

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    I reckon the increase in the use of the rising inflection is mostly from American teen sitcoms, yeah?

    sweepy
    Member

    I think that’s you officially old now Grum.

    grum
    Member

    Can’t say it’s something that especially bothers me, but it is pretty weird. I can understand there being a bit of in influence but some people do really have the accent too.

    whats an ’emo type’?

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xilOgjeEwPg[/video]

    grumz bare old blud!

    grum
    Member

    sweepy – Member
    I think that’s you officially old now Grum

    Yup that’s what I suspected. πŸ™

    grum
    Member

    Has anyone else noticed that significant numbers of young people (have to say its especially girls) talk with a mid-Atlantic accent (and say ‘like’ a lot in a 90210 style)? It’s really bizarre. These aren’t people who’ve ever lived in the US or have American parents. Probably mostly middle-class kids, often emo types. πŸ™‚

    How many generations of American cultural dominance before everyone in the country sounds American?

    Edukator
    Member

    My fifteen-year-old son speaks excellent RP with just a slightly sexy accent, thanks to never living in an English-speaking country.

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    grumz bare old blud!

    We had a lad who spoke like that at work. Took a LOT of drugs. Doesn’t work for us anymore.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    philconsequence – Member
    whats an ’emo type’?

    Emo used to be goths who were scsred of their mum to get pierced all over the place

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    emo?

    “When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised that the Lord doesn’t work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.”

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    My fifteen-year-old son speaks excellent RP with just a slightly sexy accent,

    😯

    glad you posted that drac, was afraid i’d suffer the wrath of the mods if i did.

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Subscriber

    I made my niece listen to this. Did the trick.
    [video]http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=p-LArv-sEQU[/video]

    rossi46
    Member

    “When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised that the Lord doesn’t work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.”

    Quote of the day- love it. Facebook thumbs up like type thing πŸ˜†

    piemonster
    Member

    Kids speaking English in an American accent cultural domination irony.

    globalti
    Member

    It’s not phoney American accents that annoy me, it’s people who pronounce the -er ending as -ah, as in bruvvah, muvvah, farvah, bovvah and so on.

    CountZero
    Member

    I prefer a slightly mid-Atlantic accent to an affected cod-cock-er-ney gang-banger accent. Innit, blood… πŸ™„

    cfinnimore
    Member

    *waits for an Atherton vid*

    or, Edinburgh.

    Seriously though, ken, I literally walked in an’ he wiz like, ken wit, nah, dinnae bother, like.

    Y’Ken?

    Edit: Come ‘fam, welcum’ma’ends meeeeh.

    twoniner
    Member

    Is this ‘can I get?’ that everyone uses instead of ‘can I have’ and Americanism (if thats a word?)

    I hate it, kids saying at a counter, ‘can I get a Coffee?’ NO, you can’t get a coffee, You can have one!

    I want to smash one in the face now!

    quartz
    Member

    Lewis Hamilton makes me laugh. He’s from Stevenage!

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUnWvCocKR4[/video]

    Boba Fatt
    Member

    A woman at work tries to be all americanised with her language and fair miserably, keeps writing “yah” when she means “yay”

    Worst of all, she’s in her 30’s

    cfinnimore
    Member

    Bring back “Grumpy Old Men”.

    “YOLO.”

    YOU WHAT!?

    Edit: Thanks for that Quartz. πŸ˜†

    Does this mean that Jafaican accents are over?

    munrobiker
    Member

    My wife’s American and sounds almost English, and did even before she arrived here. Weird.

    nicko74
    Member

    cod-cock-er-ney gang-banger accent. Innit, blood…

    Don’t think it’s cockerney, it’s more Caribbean patter type thing.

    And with the American accent? Comes this intonation? That makes everything sound like a question? So you want to punch someone?

    funniest thing, and saddest too, i’ve seen/heard was a bunch of local kids with fairly broad cornish accents trying to be all cool with an aliG type accent.

    like!

    FeeFoo
    Member

    Young people make the language fresh and ever-changing.

    Some old people object.

    grum
    Member

    Young people make the language fresh and ever-changing.
    Some old people object.

    Hmmm…. It’s not really the language I have an issue with, it’s the American accent and the rising intonation yeah?

    For some reason the fake cockney gangsta thing bothers me less. πŸ™‚

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    Tbf, I hear the upward inflection but I’ve never really heard the American accent that strongly. I also think that kids grow out of the fake cockney gangsta patua type thing after a while too. I find it quite funny listening to my two nephews in London – they couldn’t be more middle class but listening to them talking with their mates is hilarious. πŸ™‚

    djglover
    Member

    Spending too much time evesdropping on teenage girls. I hope op is a teacher!

    chewkw
    Member

    Yes, upward inflection πŸ™‚
    Is that a reflection of wanting to be accepted or trying to say that one is more trendy and up-to-date?

    Premier Icon timidwheeler
    Subscriber

    I think it is a lack of confidence? By making every statement a question? The speaker is looking for agreement/affirmation? From the group? Yeah?

    grum
    Member

    Spending too much time evesdropping on teenage girls. I hope op is a teacher!

    I’m a ‘music leader’ for a community music charity which involves running workshops etc with young people (amongst other things) – I’ve got a clean enhanced CRB check and everything! πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon oldagedpredator
    Subscriber

    Is this in the same way as 30somethings all embraced cafe culture a while back when that american show Friends was on the go?

    hels
    Member

    That question mark at the end of every sentence is called a high rising terminal, and it originated in New Zealand, spread to Australia and I imagine got over here via Neighbours and Home & Away. It’s quite infectious. Just FYI.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 55 total)

The topic ‘Young people and American accents’ is closed to new replies.