You thought MMR was bad – you want bad science? Look at this.

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  • You thought MMR was bad – you want bad science? Look at this.
  • camo16
    Member

    Seriously, how long does it take to grill/fry bacon?

    It’s a fairly quick snack no matter how it’s cooked (heated)

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    On the other hand, jacket potatoes benefit from a blast prior to oven insertion.

    aye, I do that, tried the spoke through the spud whilst baking didn’t give me the fluffy jacket potato innards I was promised.

    So mixing flour, sugar, butter, eggs and a bit of milk putting it in a buttered basin with jam in the bottom then microwaving it for a few mins to make a sponge pudding isnt cooking?

    that sounds like it shouldn’t work, but who knows, I vote for an STW ride/bake off, you bring that someone else bring a proper cooked pudding and we’ll do taste tests. Actually better be several of both types 🙂

    camo16
    Member

    I vote for an STW ride/bake off, you bring that someone else bring a proper cooked pudding and we’ll do taste tests.

    I’ll second that!

    Northwest venue, please.

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    Northwest venue, please.

    of course, as chief taster I won’t be cooking myself obviously 😉

    Premier Icon aracer
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    that would be a type of cooking called boiling

    Yep – just as cooking in the microwave is known as microwaving. The cells you’re denaturing don’t really care where the heat source comes from.

    It definitely works molgrips also said, quickest steam pudding ever.

    And the variations are endless one of my favourites is to chuck in some mixed spice and a handful of raisins and put in syrup instead of jam.

    By far the quickest way to obesity – thankfully we have bicycles to work it all off

    A bake off would be good – and you can do alsorts of sponges in a microwave – as long as you dont mind them being anaemic, fairy cakes are very fast too.

    Premier Icon 40mpg
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    I do scrambled eggs in the microwave all the time*, will I die?

    They do start a bit omelettey but a quick mash with a fork gives perfect scramblies in seconds, and no pan scrubbing after too!

    *by ‘all the time’ I don’t mean I’m stuck in a time loop permanently microwaving eggs, that would be silly. Its just a turn of phrase.

    mogrim
    Member

    I really didn’t need to learn that you can make sponge pudding in seconds in the microwave.

    samuri
    Member

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/2269439/How-to-cook-the-perfect-bacon-sandwich-by-Marco-Pierre-White.html

    Yeah but he’s a tosser.

    Anyway, the right thing to do if anyone really thinks microwaved food comes even close to traditionally well cooked food is feel very, very sorry for them as they’ve never eaten properly cooked food.

    It might also be worth giving the worlds top chefs a ring to let them know they’re doing it all wrong.

    geetee1972
    Member

    I do scrambled eggs in the microwave all the time*, will I die?

    Not immediately but you might morph into a chicken with the corrupted DNA

    Ramsey Neil
    Member

    Sponge pudding done in the microwave has a more gritty texture than one cooked conventionally , also as it cools it goes hard whereas the steamed one doesn’t . Microwaves certainly have many uses but there are not many things you can cook from raw in them that come out the same .

    CountZero
    Member

    Anyway, the right thing to do if anyone really thinks microwaved food comes even close to traditionally well cooked food is feel very, very sorry for them as they’ve never eaten properly cooked food.

    I’m perfectly aware of what properly cooked food tastes like,, but, as I’m getting something to eat for me, and me alone, I’d rather get an Iceland Chicken Khorma or Byriani, for a quid, and some mixed rice and vegetables, and nuke’em, taking about fifteen minutes, than have to buy all the ingredients, spend ages prepping them, then cooking them.
    I truly can’t be arsed, and anyway, it always tastes like a curry to me anyway.

    mogrim
    Member

    adjustablewench – Member
    So mixing flour, sugar, butter, eggs and a bit of milk putting it in a buttered basin with jam in the bottom then microwaving it for a few mins to make a sponge pudding isnt cooking?

    Tried and tasted tonight, vote of approval from Mrs. mogrim, the mini-mogrims and me.

    Used this recipe, main failing according to all is that it doesn’t make enough 🙂

    piemonster
    Member

    From some of the posts on here it’s clear some have been nowhere near a restaurant kitchen. Fair enough really.

    Nowt wrong with microwaves, there a tool. They do a job and they do it well. If your getting crud results chances are its your fault.

    Junkyard
    Member

    Missed this will also try a vegan version tomorrow of what I am calling cheats cake – eaten too much banana bread today to do one now

    Might not rise properly as it is a batter mix ah well will see

    Premier Icon Sandwich
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    Like most things if you overdo the heating the food suffers. The margin for error with a microwave is that much slimmer because of the shorter cooking times.
    Scrambled eggs require great care otherwise you end up with leathery eggs. I like mine with a bit of moistness to them and 10 seconds can be the margin between success and yuck. With conventional cooking you get a couple of minutes before it all goes to pooh. The microwave eggs will be fluffier though.

    Just to add my two-pence worth, I’ve just eaten porridge prepared in just 90 seconds in the microwave. Not quite as “creamy” in texture as the stuff made in a pan, but yummy nonetheless, dead easy to make for just one person, and exactly what I need before I head out for a hard day moving numbers around in a Excel spreadsheet.

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    Sponge pudding done in the microwave has a more gritty texture than one cooked conventionally , also as it cools it goes hard whereas the steamed one doesn’t

    That suggests that the cells do care about the heat source. Yes the difference between “warming up” and “cooking” is debatable but in some cases it does make a difference, sticking with breakfast how do you manage a fried egg the way I like them in a microwave? frazzled on both sides but plenty of runny yolk?
    Will give the nuka-bacon a go at weekend tho.

    Just to add my two-pence worth, I’ve just eaten porridge prepared in just 90 seconds in the microwave

    90seconds? how? my porridge takes ~5mins of nuking, yep I’ll hold my hands up not only at work but I also nuke porridge at home…and custard, I’m a milk-pan-o-phobe, burnt it too many times.
    I’ve made microwave scrambled eggs a few times and never been really happy with the results, of course I screw it up using a pan occasionally but hit rate is pretty good.

    but of course it’s all IMO 🙂

    samuri
    Member

    From some of the posts on here it’s clear some have been nowhere near a restaurant kitchen. Fair enough really.

    Nowt wrong with microwaves, there a tool. They do a job and they do it well. If your getting crud results chances are its your fault.

    I worked in one for 3 years. I’d say that shit restaurants use them and good ones don’t. You can re-heat things up with them and do some basic pre-heat stuff but that’s about it.

    I’m sure they can produce acceptable food for those in a rush or who aren’t too picky but they simply can’t produce food to the same standard as traditional cooking can.

    Premier Icon aracer
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    sticking with breakfast how do you manage a fried egg the way I like them in a microwave?

    How do you make porridge under the grill? How do you make a nice soft boiled egg in a frying pan?

    piemonster
    Member

    I’m sure they can produce acceptable food for those in a rush or who aren’t too picky but they simply can’t produce food to the same standard as traditional cooking can

    From my perspective, they are not supposed to replace traditional cooking. But act as an aid, nothing more. Didn’t mean to suggest otherwise.

    Which was where my “if you’re getting crud results” comment comes in. If your trying to cook a whole meal, your using it wrong.

    But yes, shit restaurants overuse them a lot. Good lord, I’ve had too many meals reheated and annihilated by microwaves. And then they have to audacity to ask if you enjoyed your meal, as you’ve just pulled out a hammer and chisel to extract the food fused to the dish.

    piemonster
    Member

    90seconds? how? my porridge takes ~5mins of nuking, yep I’ll hold my hands up not only at work but I also nuke porridge at home…and custard, I’m a milk-pan-o-phobe, burnt it too many times.

    I think it’s the Oats so Simple stuff ❗

    Junkyard
    Member

    I’m a milk-pan-o-phobe, burnt it too many times.
    I’ve made microwave scrambled eggs a few times and never been really happy with the results

    Have you considered learning to cook?

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    How do you make porridge under the grill? How do you make a nice soft boiled egg in a frying pan?

    exactly. Microwaves only heat things up the rest of the kitchen will do specific jobs that microwaves can’t. if you want to make raw stuff edible for humans yep you can use any heat source you want but if you want to create specific food stuff I refer you back to

    cells do care about the heat source

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    Have you considered learning to cook?

    Hey I only mentioned what was possible with cookery, I never said I was any good at it 🙂

    Premier Icon aracer
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    cells do care about the heat source

    Except they don’t.

    A grill only heats things up – it heats things up in a different way to a microwave. If you had only a grill and a microwave in your kitchen which would you choose to use to make your porridge?

    Premier Icon GrahamS
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    Yep, I like my Oats So Simple. Produces really pretty edible porridge in a nice pre-measured quantity (very handy for calorie tracking and portion control).

    Granted it’s not proper porridge (or “porage”) – but it is quick, tasty and doesn’t involve scrubbing a pan afterwards.

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    Except they don’t.

    not sure what your point is aracer unless it’s just purely to argue. I said you can heat things up in a microwave but “proper” food takes other equipment. Which now seems to be what you are saying aswell but in a different way.

    Junkyard
    Member

    cells do care about the heat source

    Except they don’t.

    Have you tried to make toast in a microwave ? 😉

    piemonster
    Member

    Have you tried searing steak in a microwave?

    phil.w
    Member

    From some of the posts on here it’s clear some have been nowhere near a restaurant kitchen. Fair enough really.

    I used to work in them. Oddly enough the ones with Michelin stars didn’t use microwaves.

    To preserve taste there’s better ways of reheating food.

    piemonster
    Member

    Oddly enough Michelin star restaurants are able to charge for the privilege of not having short cuts taken in the kitchen.

    Premier Icon prettygreenparrot
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    The original social media piece appeared as if by magic as a friend registered their scepticism on Facebook. I found it hilarious. It reminded me of some of the crazier bits of homeopathy. ‘microwaves agitate the molecules’ – almost like heating then? 😆

    Premier Icon Cheezpleez
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    I cooked a layered chocolate cake with ganache icing in the office microwave a couple of weeks ago. Tarted it up with whipped cream and strawberries and fed about 25 people.

    It was really nice.

    piemonster
    Member

    On the chocolate front, I was in a very good quality chocolatier just after Christmas. They use them constantly, I was a little surprised but it made perfect sense.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Oddly enough the ones with Michelin stars didn’t use microwaves

    And as I am ashamed to admit, my own kitchen does not have a Michelin star.

    Tools for jobs, that’s what they are. Microwaves, not Michelin starred restaurants.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
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    I have heard of sommeliers using microwaves to slightly warm red wine before serving, especially if it has just come up from a cold wine cellar.

    Not that any of them would admit to doing that of course.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
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    I tested out our microwave on my daughter’s hamster. There’s definitely some molecular disintegration going on – the hamster seems quite lethargic now. Could this be a homeopathic effect?

    Once it cools down I’ll slip it back into its cage before my daughter comes home.

    If these things catch on we’re doomed, I tell you.

    piemonster
    Member

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EH1G4EwljM[/video]

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