Yeti ASR 5

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  • Yeti ASR 5
  • rhysw
    Member

    Im looking into swapping my On one 456c for a Yeti ASR 5. It’ll be mostly for riding trail centre’s and long xc rides. Whats the general feeling about these bikes, i hear there’s issues with the rear end cracking?
    I also own a Specialized Enduro Expert 2011 which i love. This bike is for riding local DH tracks on our “all mountain” rides.My only worry is that they’ll be a little similar. The Enduro is too much for trail centre/long enduro events (Dyfi/CRC)so i was thinking the Yeti would be just right.
    Any thoughts?

    Cheers

    chojin
    Member

    Older frames had the issue, anything recent (2011 onwards I believe) they are much sturdier.
    I have all the riding finesse of a Hippo and haven’t managed to break mine in a year of ownership.

    Buy through official channels and you’ll get a 5 year warranty anyway.

    ti_pin_man
    Member

    I test rode one earlier this year around swinley and thought it was a good bike, very good, but not exceptional. I think you’d find it good for that kind of riding but you also might want to check out the scott spark or ibis mojo. I loved the spark.

    JPcapel
    Member

    Is outstanding.
    Builds into 26lb build (alloy model) running 1×10 set up, incl dropper post.
    Has quite a long TT for the medium (23.4) which allows running a short stem to take advantage of the slack HA and hammer it.
    Has very low BB, so pedal strikes are common, suggest running sub 170mm cranks.
    Jumps well.
    Corners super quick, with handling that has been better any previous bikes I’ve owned.
    Only minor complaint is bob when pedalling, trying to dial that out with either firmer air pressure or use of low speed compression damping became the bain of owning a asr5.
    I suspect the carbon model would build into a comfortably sub 26lb build.
    Is good for all day Xc rides, plus some DH fun, jumping, is very versatile.
    I sold mine and got a Blur TRC which is near enough the same, but the VPP link does away with pedal induced bob so for my money is better.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    I did two months of testing 9 bikes and ended up with an ASR-5.

    Superbike IMO, very, very capable (if your buying a 120mm fork its much more capable than you think) . Can be built light.

    You’ve missed the 5 year warranty though, Yeti now offer only 2 years on new frames. As had been said, The 2011 onwards swingarms are stonger, I have a years use around the country’s trail centres, and a few events with no issues at all.

    Test ride it, I’m sure you won’t regret it. The BikeRadar review (google it) is very accurate.

    chojin
    Member

    I didn’t know the warranty had been cut to two years for new models?
    Hmmmpf.

    Ah well. It’s still one of the best allrounders I’ve tried, I run mine with Talas forks which seem to suit it.

    Premier Icon Recycler
    Subscriber

    Owned mine since April and absolutely love it to bits. I ride mainly trail centres, Dales and Moors and it suits me perfectly. 140 up front with a short stem and wide bars = trail missile IMHO.

    Used to ride a Zesty which always felt like too much bike for me, whereas the Yeti is lighter, climbs better and is just as good going down.

    Go on…..you know you want one.

    rexated
    Member

    ahem ( 😉 )

    http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/fs-yeti-asr5-c-medium-2012

    carbon loveliness for a lot less than the ali version. And it has the stronger rear end at only bought earlier this year.

    I suspect the carbon model would build into a comfortably sub 26lb build.

    – I did a couple of xc races and weight-weenied it down to 22lb. Great as a trailbike at 24lb.

    rhysw
    Member

    Cheers for the info guys
    Rexated, can you run a 140mm fork with the ASR 5c? The Yeti site recomends 100-120mm.
    Im not sure if i’d need a M or L. I know they come up quite long but i ride a Large Specialized Enduro and this falls inbetween the M and L Yeti

    Premier Icon Leku
    Subscriber

    the 5 is designed for 120mm – 140mm fork. 130mm is considered the ‘sweet spot’.

    http://www.yeticycles.com/#/bikes/asr5

    “COMPATIBLE WITH 140MM OR 120MM FORKS”

    Premier Icon Leku
    Subscriber

    ohh..

    COMPATIBLE WITH 100MM OR 120MM FORKS

    http://www.yeticycles.com/#/bikes/asrc

    seems a bit strange

    Premier Icon mrhoppy
    Subscriber

    @leku asr-c is the XC bike the asr5-c is the carbon version.

    Premier Icon Leku
    Subscriber

    ahh I was right

    http://www.yeticycles.com/#/bikes/asr5c

    COMPATIBLE WITH 140MM OR 120MM FORKS

    rhysw
    Member

    my error
    120-140mm

    rexated
    Member

    well, just to be contrary, I have my fox floats set at 130mm and that indeed seems to be the sweetspot…..120 felt racey, and 140 traily – much as you’d expect I guess.

    rhysw
    Member

    what about sizing? Im 5″10 but i like a long top tube

    rhysw
    Member

    You got some more pics Rexated?
    RhyswheelerATliveDOTcoDOYuk

    cheers

    Premier Icon davetrave
    Subscriber

    The ASR-C is the short travel XC full susser – 100-120mm forks; the ASR5-C is the carbon version of the ASR5, XC/trail full susser – 120-140mm forks, although I’ve seen/heard of them running 150mm as well.

    Personally, I’ve an ASR5-C, running 120mm/QR15 forks, it’s a 2011 frame – no issues with the back end. Suits me perfectly – mainly long distance, all day natural riding with the odd trail centre day thrown in. As said previously, you’ll be surprised how capable the bike is even with only a 120mm fork – largely down to the light weight achievable and the subsequent flickability of the bike, you can move from line to line so easily. I did TransWales on mine last year (challenging for podium in the pairs) and for me was the perfect bike blending all day XC rideability with trail bike capability and built with sensible kit, light but not so light it was going to break at the mere hint of a rock (XTR, Hope Hoops/stem/BB, etc), I was running it at a shade under 24lb. In it’s more routine day-to-day riding it’s a smidge over 25lb.

    It goes uphill like a rocket and is almost as fast on the downs – I’m happy barelling down techy Peak and Lakes stuff like Potato Alley, Garburn, etc, at speed with the short travel because it’s such a confidence inspiring bike – slack enough and low enough without being too far downhill inclined.

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    I love mine, as has been said, it is a bit bobbier than some but a bit more air in the shock does help with this. Goes like stink and makes me smile every time, loves to be thrown into corners, superb bike.

    Premier Icon variflex
    Subscriber

    Im lucky enough to have both a C456 and an ASR5.
    Both totally different, but the ASR5 is fantastic.
    Im running full XTR, reverb and 140mm fox forks and its perfect.

    It goes up as well as it goes down.
    Go for the bolt through rear end, as I did manage to snap my rear triangle (2011 frame), but that was a QR rear end. Silverfish replaced it under warranty in 5 days flat which was great service and with the bolt through rear end Ive had no more issues.

    2012 frames onwards I believe only have a 2 year warranty now, but could be wrong.

    Go for it.

    localhero94
    Member

    Brilliant bike, and as has been said, just as happy doing Peaks downhills as 100k xc rides. I have a 2010 model and had a cracked rear triangle on the driveside chainstay – replaced within 3 days (by the then importers, Evolution). No problems since, I took it to the Alps in the summer and it coped perfectly.

    Premier Icon charliemort
    Subscriber

    I’ve had no problem with mine since early 2011 and i’m around 95kg in my birthday suit

    One thing to bear in mind – I believe the alloy version is discontinued for 2013, which could mean:

    a) hang on, there could be some deals around
    b) hurry up, there’ll be none left, or
    c) there’s something else around the corner

    your choice

    very vagur rumours of switch link 650b / a more enduro/marathon 29’er than the 95

    Premier Icon Prophet2
    Subscriber

    I’m 5’10, ride a medium ASR5, 65mm stem, fits perfectly. Also run 130mm forks. Originally bought with 120mm forks with which the ASR5 was very quick. Bit slower now on the 130mm but feels much more capable over the rough stuff. Still climbs like a goat.

    excalibur
    Member

    JP – A quick hijack on the ASR 5 post. What size TRC did you get? I’m looking to change from my Yeti too. The TRC Med & Large sit either side of the yeti sizing. Is it a good fit for you?

    Superficial
    Member

    I know the whole ‘one bike’ thing is highly subjective, but I don’t think there’s a better bike for the kind of riding I do*. Just out in the peaks with mates, racing each other sometimes but mostly just larking around. Trails centres can bollocks.

    It’s a weapon pointing down yet it’s superfast uphill – anything faster up would be horribly twitchy ride down and anything faster going down would be a pain going up. I came from a Commencal Meta 5, and the Yeti is just better in all regards, faster / stiffer going down but a different level going uphill.

    *Caveat: I have a DH bike too. The Yeti isn’t the sort of bike I’d want to uplift.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    rhysw – Member
    Cheers for the info guys
    Rexated, can you run a 140mm fork with the ASR 5c? The Yeti site recomends 100-120mm.
    Im not sure if i’d need a M or L. I know they come up quite long but i ride a Large Specialized Enduro and this falls inbetween the M and L Yeti

    Unless you have oran-utang arms you’re a medium. They do have a long top tube. I’m 1/4 off six foot and have a medium, 70mm stem and it fits fine. I could fit a large also but it’s be more poderous around the twist woodling singetrack which is my local /75% riding territory.

    As it is, its stable yet chuckable fun. FWIW I think Davetrave’s summary is one of the best I’ve seen for accuracy.

    rexated
    Member

    Rhys – you’ll have email shortly.

    For info, I’m 5’10 and have run the bike with a 70mm stem and a slight layback seatpost for trail riding, and a 90mm stem and inline post for xc. If I wanted it longer the best thing to do to the bike would be to have wider bars as I’ve been using either 640mm (with bar ends on an ASR5, this may be considered sacrilege!) or 685mm eastons. With something like a 710mm bar the already rangey toptube would stretch things out nicely for an even shorter stem.

    Premier Icon davetrave
    Subscriber

    FWIW I think Davetrave’s summary is one of the best I’ve seen for accuracy.

    Why, thank you kind sir…!

    I’m similar height to Kryton57 and also run a 70mm stem on a medium frame, with 680mm Ritchey Superlogic bars and a 10mm layback USE Sumo post. Same as Rexated, I’ve run a longer stem/inline post for a racier feel in the past but the 70/680/10 set up I find to be a very good all-round compromise.

    Superficial
    Member

    I’m 6′ with 34′ inseam, mine’s a medium, but then I’m on 750mm bars. I can’t decide if I’d go for a large if I had to choose again, but I’m not about to change. I think the large would be a different kind of bike – more stretched out, probably faster both up and down, but less manoeuvrable?

    Premier Icon jimmy
    Subscriber

    Had mine for 2.5 years now, my longest-standing regularly-ridden bike. It is ace, genuinely. Has been to the Alps twice and outshone DH bikes hired, has done a DH race in Scotland and Enduro Now as well as countless ‘XC’ rides. Does it all really well IMO – goes up, comes down and round corners and helps you do it. I think its probably OTT for most trail centres (given the above) but then its also somehow perfect. I’ve toyed with selling it many times purely due to need-a-new-bike syndrome but every time I ride it, I want to keep it forever. I have cracked the rear end but think I know why and wouldn’t blame the bike. Other than doing silly things on it, its pretty tough.

    My ONLY bugbear which is coming to a head is a ~18″ seat tube for a small frame. It sometimes doesn’t feel as small and chuckable as I’d like as a result, especially with the recent dropper post addition.

    In short, I don’t think you’d regret it.

    EDIT: Just seen this:

    Goes like stink and makes me smile every time, loves to be thrown into corners, superb bike

    That would have done it really.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    I hate this thread now, as its re-kindled the “feeling” of riding my ASR-5, whilst currently I defer to hardtail in the mud / road.

    Bring back some dry-ish trails!

    Premier Icon P20
    Subscriber

    I’ve got the ASR5C, it’s my 2nd Yeti after an old 575. The 5 is fantastic. I’ve had no problems with bob as previously mentioned. It’s probably the best climbing bike I’ve ridden. It seems to love carving down singletrack. I love it. No idea on weight, but it’s light.
    Set up: I’m 5’8″ inline post, 70mm stem, 680mm bars, 140mm vanillas. My 18″ 456 has the same set up.

    dgb1
    Member

    Nothing much to add to what has already been said.
    I’ve got an ASR5c, it’s my first Yeti and I must say it’s absolutely fantastic. I only have it about 6 weeks now with the majority of parts coming off my Cove HT. I haven’t touched my 160mm bike since it has arrived, it’s very nearly as fast as it on the downs but eminently better uphill.

    Setup: I’m 5’8″, medium frame, inline post, 70mm stem, 725mm bars, 120mm Reba 20mm Maxle.

    You owe it to yourself to at least take one out for a spin.

    rhysw
    Member

    Thanks for all the info guys.
    Does anyone know of a shop which has one as a demo bike in the South Wales area ?

    dan45a
    Member

    rhysw, I’m in cardiff and bought my asr5c 12 months ago from Don Skene.

    I couldnt get a demo there, but went to skyline cycles at afan and tested the asr5 (alloy), I loved it…the rest is history…

    For info – My build is a meduim, with 140mm floats, 50mm stem, 711mm bars, reverb. 1 x9 XT, R1 brakes. about 25.5lbs.

    Pretty much agree with the above comments on the bike, its awesome up and down. I came from a carbon zesty and dont regret it one bit. Its not quite as plush on the rear, but feels a lot quicker on descents. I think its down to the 67 deg HA you get running 140mm fork and the low BB.

    Agree with the comment its not for uplift days nor would I use it in the alps. Thats where your enduro comes in 🙂

    JPcapel
    Member

    excalibur

    I got a medium TRC
    I am 5ft 10 on a tall day.
    I prefer small bikes so they are more flickable.
    FOr me the ASR5 seat tube on the medium was too long (18.5″), I prefer to slam the saddle down when jumping. The TRC medium has a 17″ seat tube versus a 19″ on the large, so was a simply choice.
    I run a 65mm stem and use a KS dropper post which is in line and slide the saddle fairly rearward on the rails. The TRC has a steep seat tube angle, so the rearward saddle position hardly notices and you tend to shuffle forward on the saddle when climbing.
    I suspect truth be told I would fit a large better, but my medium regularly goes to chicksands and its proving to be an amazing bike there on the dual and 4x track, in fairness, as was the yeti (albeit with too long a seat tube – I did consider, seriously, cutting the seat tube down on the Yeti and then thought better of this idea).
    Hope this helps. I suspect up to 5ft 9″ a medium is the right choice, above this go large, unless like me you prefer small bikes.

    slowmart
    Member

    I’d agree with the sentiments displayed above about the flattering ability the bike graces the owner with.

    The only downside of ownership is the durability of the carbon surface. After my very first ride which was in soaking conditions at CYB i had managed to wear through the clear frame protector and started to wear the actual carbon down! The shop was helpful but ultimately did nothing other than apply extra tape. Luckily for all concerned I view it as a bike and i’m not precious about marks and scrapes. if I was more anal this would have presented a substantial problem. The carbon weave on an Ibis is much more robust and my mate as had no issues. Except on keeping up 😉

    I have tried helicopter tape and had the same issue with lizard skins being the only solution which is not was expected on a bike of this calibre. That said I’d buy another tomorrow if this one was stolen.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    Slomart – where? I AM anal and gave helitaped my rear triangle but still nothing rubs?

    slowmart
    Member

    My inner heel rubs the rear stay. Badly.

    My other bike is a ti deluxe which means any bad technique has only shown with the Yeti!

    localhero94
    Member

    I do that on mine, but a quick wrap of Biketart’s framewrap stops any damage.

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