Would you say anything?

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  • Would you say anything?
  • Jamie
    Member

    Is it ok if I just post here so I can bask in your awesomeness?

    gogg
    Member

    only on a forum later…

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    I often wonder this when I see folk with saddles far too high/low, pushing massive gears, riding very bow-legged etc etc. Always decide folk are more likely to be offended than thankful, so never bother.

    Except the guy I passed on Coombe Bottom who had his (S-Works) helmet on back to front. He was very thankful. I sniggered.

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    More importantly, was he sour-faced and failing to say hello, or did he draft you without permission?

    whatnobeer
    Member

    Most likely I wouldn’t say anything unless they looked like they were trying to get into the sport but hadn’t quite got something right. How I’d make that call I’m not sure, but I suspect to a lot of people ‘friendly advice’ might come across as patronising.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    I suspect to a lot of people ‘friendly advice’ might come across as patronising.

    Which is the conclusion I always make!

    Premier Icon grizedaleforest
    Subscriber

    “I’m impressed at the way you can push that big gear. Are you training for something? Well best of luck, toodaloo”

    allthepies
    Member

    I see a lady commuting on a bike quite often and she’s all over the bike, top half of her body moving up/down/side to side. Looks very inefficient and awkward.

    slowoldgit
    Member

    Are you sure he wasn’t scuppered by a broken gear cable?

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Subscriber

    Except the guy I passed on Coombe Bottom who had his (S-Works) helmet on back to front. He was very thankful. I sniggered.

    So that’s why my helmet has a sticker inside that says “front” with an arrow pointing forwards :-/

    There was me thinking it was a waste of paper, ink & glue.

    Premier Icon spawnofyorkshire
    Subscriber

    I got lambasted on here for saying I pointed out to another rider that they were being unsafe on the road.
    Just tell them at the time and then keep it off STW
    It’s up to the rider to take it as helpful advice as intended or to take offense.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    There’s a bloke I know from the pub who started road riding a year ago. He kept telling me how his hips wagggle from side to side. I said “try lowering your saddle” Then his knees were aching because they were over straightening. I said “try lowering your saddle”. Then he had a bit of back ache. I said “try lowering your saddle”.

    One day he told me he’s paid £170 for a bikefit. Martin Earley told him to drop his saddle by 6cm.

    You get what you pay for I suppose.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    Depends on whether he was riding singlespeed or not…

    I’ve done it once – at Tignes a clearly out of their depth family came wobbling down the trail, pinballing off everything, the mother was particularly out of here depth and stopped in front of me to push the bike over a small dip. I just mention that she would find it easier if she dropped the saddle and stood up. She was thankful and grumbled about being forced to do it by her husband and teenage son.
    Would only offer advice to a stranger if they were obviously a complete beginner, it’s just patronising if someone is OK but has dodgy technique (especially as mine is hardly perfect).

    bikebouy
    Member

    Nah, say nowt, crack on.

    Are you the thought/style/training/riding police?

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    So that’s why my helmet has a sticker inside that says “front” with an arrow pointing forwards :-/

    Ironically (as I have the same helmet!) so did his, clearly he didn’t heed it! He did seem mortified, but it must have been bloody uncomfy!

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I always have the ‘should I say something’ dilemma when I see a bike with forks on back to front.

    It’s even worse with kids bikes where the proud parents are walking along behind feeling chuffed with their new purchase.

    How many kids have been put off riding for life by steering that doesn’t do what it should?

    Mister P
    Member

    I was pootling along on my way to work this morning on my road bike when I caught up with a chap, also on a road bike. I think he may have been an MTBer though as he was pushing a massive gear, throwing his body about and straining away. I sat behind for a moment spinning nicely then pulled alongside, said morning and glided off. Poor chap looked like it was hurting a lot and I contemplated suggesting a lower gear may make it easier. Then I thought better of it and kept my mouth shut. Should I have given a little friendly advice or is it best to let folk ride their own way?

    Pete B
    Member

    As a cycle commuter I see all manner of people riding all manner of bikes in all manners.
    I couldn’t give a fvck – am I lacking manners?

    brakes
    Member

    if you were riding backwards, would you put your helmet on backwards?

    mogrim
    Member

    I always have the ‘should I say something’ dilemma when I see a bike with forks on back to front.

    I’d say something there – it’s possibly dangerous, and doesn’t inspire me with confidence about the rest of their bike. Someone pushing a higher gear than they ought to? Nah, that’s their problem. Perhaps they’re training?

    legend
    Member

    I sat behind for a moment spinning nicely then pulled alongside, said morning and glided off

    wheel sucking ****

    Premier Icon jonathan
    Subscriber

    wheel sucking ****

    Proper LOL 🙂

    A mate and I bit our tongues at Cwmcarn at the weekend when a family turned up to the cafe with two young kids on bikes. Both the kids forks were on backwards but decided it might not be well received as we sat there with our carbon ego chariots.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    I often have the urge to offer to oil peoples chains for them as I hear them squeaking by on shonky bikes. I don’t, but it would be so easy to make their ride that much nicer and I almost feel the pain of that poor bike : ) It’s a nails-on-blackboard sound to me and I can’t understand how people don’t hear that noise and eventually think ‘hmmm, maybe a little oil….?’

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I often wonder this when I see folk with saddles far too high/low

    A couple of years back on a camping holiday, we arranged for bike hire.

    When we got there we were met by half a dozen of the sorriest looking bikes I’ve ever seen, they looked like the sort of thing you’d have found rusting quietly to themselves in a teenager’s shed in the 80s.

    The woman in the shop helpfully set them up for us. First thing I did was raise the saddle about eight inches so that, y’know, it was in the right place for me when actually riding rather than standing over it with both feet flat on the ground. She commented, “wow, you have your saddle really high, don’t you?” Amazing.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Should I have given a little friendly advice or is it best to let folk ride their own way?

    You don’t know the reason for him riding a big gear – maybe it was part of a training plan.

    A guy drafted me last week as I was toiling into a serious headwind, stopped at a set of lights for him to skip all the usual pleasantries for him to tell me ‘I needed a bike fit’. I didn’t hesitate to tell him to keep his opinions to himself. I also advised him that my form may not be perfect as I was battling a headwind whilst hauling his ass along.

    Pillock.

    Mister P
    Member

    I am with you on that one Jameso. I did think about keeping a bottle of Finish Line Cross Country in my jersey pocket for such occasions. But asking random strangers if they want a little lubrication may get me a smack in the mouth 😯 😆

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    ^ Probably.. I still have a few of those little emergency sachets of Finish Line from the shows years ago. But I keep them to myself : )

    scotia
    Member

    if its a safety issue then yes – like the forks up there^^ i’d be tempted to say (and have done in the past). Typically a quick release thats not done up or some other thing..

    pushing a big gear? their choice..

    Premier Icon pictonroad
    Subscriber

    During Cambridge to London a few years ago I pointed out a quick release that was half done up on the bike adjacent to me. The rider looked down, swerved into me and took us both out.

    Not everyone knows what they’re doing.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Typically a quick release thats not done up or some other thing

    You notice that level of detail when you pass someone, and you pass on the inside!

    pondo
    Member

    Always decide folk are more likely to be offended than thankful, so never bother.

    +1, unless it’s someone I’m with, and I can think of a way to say it without patronising.

    teamslug
    Member

    jameso…dont mix the finish line sachets up with energy gels….

    plumber
    Member

    I did mention to a beginner guy to raise his seat post but he got all hormonal so I’ve never bothered since

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    Thing is, I guess there’s unhelpful stuff:
    “you need a bike fit”
    “you’re riding dangerously”

    and more helpful stuff:
    “your saddle looks a little low”
    “your stem looks a little long”

    I see loads of dodgy skewers too, but figure if people can’t fathom how a QR works, they’re unlikely to be receptive to my suggestions unprompted at a set of traffic lights.

    I stopped at a set of lights in Edinburgh recently next to student type girl whose very shiny new Carrera MTB had the front QR dangling like a broken branch. I politely pointed it out and she was grateful, then as I set off at the green light my pedal fell off and clattered under a bus, felt just a wee bit stupid. She cycled away without a word. Fairynuff.

    Klunk
    Member

    But asking random strangers if they want a little lubrication may get me a smack in the mouth

    you don’t even need to open your mouth for most people to want to smack you in the mouth Mark 😉

    jambourgie
    Member

    A mate of mine only uses ‘the big uns’ at the front. I think he never got the hang of indexing his rear gears so it just stays put. He says that he likes it because it’s ‘more minimal’ and he gets a better workout. I have pointed out that he could have an equally beneficial workout, over a longer, more interesting ride if he utilized all his gears. He didn’t get it. It looks hard work to me, stood up everywhere, mashing away, sweating like a rapist. Each to their own…

    xiphon
    Member

    I do mention it to people, in a polite non-patronising manner.

    Probably 80% are thankful (just made their life much easier – seat height + gearing = pedal efficiency!), 10% say they prefer it that way (fair enough I say), 10% get arsey.

    The 80% are probably just ignorant in the “correct” method (perhaps nobody ever showed them?). Same goes for suspension setup. Many people will drop £1k on a bike (order online), with no idea how to set it up properly.

    Probably stems from someone showing me, when I first got a full-sus. Had a rigid before hand, and no idea what rebound/compression/etc adjustments did on the forks/shock.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    jameso…dont mix the finish line sachets up with energy gels….

    See, a tip worth having .. : )
    ..because I have been dumb enough to mix up toothpaste and germolene tubes in the dark when on a bike tour. Thankfully I got a funny taste not a minty taint.

    Gary_M
    Member

    I do mention it to people, in a polite non-patronising manner.
    Probably 80% are thankful (just made their life much easier – seat height + gearing = pedal efficiency!), 10% say they prefer it that way (fair enough I say), 10% get arsey.

    You do it a lot then? I’d get arsey, I know what I’m doing and I don’t need some smart arse rocking up and telling me to make adjustments to suit what he considers to be right.

    I always have the ‘should I say something’ dilemma when I see a bike with forks on back to front.

    Yup. Pointed out to some woman in the park that both her kids’ bikes had the forks on the wrong way round. She wasn’t convinced so I asked if she didn’t think it odd that the brakes were behind the forks. She said her husband fitted them. I then suggested that the kids were finding it tricky to ride as the angles/rake etc were all wrong (without using those terms)

    She was intrigued but not 100% convinced as her husband had set it up.
    At which point it becomes quite tricky to suggest that maybe she should put less stock in what her clueless husband says about bikes and either take them to the LBS or devote some logical thought to the process and decide for herself how they should be set up.

    minefield

    theflatboy
    Member

    I would point out if it’s something potentially dangerous that the person / child wouldn’t realise, and have corrected the backwards fork for someone as well. I don’t mind if people get upset about it, I’d rather risk it than see something I know is potentially dangerous and not mention it.

Viewing 45 posts - 1 through 45 (of 60 total)

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