Worn rockers… for the bin?

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  • Worn rockers… for the bin?
  • LoCo
    Member
    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    They’d have to be very thin, and they’d probably move, wearing the arm more. <probably>.

    Goosed. Looks like something I’d do. One to take on the chin I’m afraid

    mattzzzzzz
    Member

    Nylon shims?

    Premier Icon sam_underhill
    Subscriber

    Just ordered some replacement rockers (and a full pivot rebuild kit) for my flux from Greg @ turner. I’m in exactly the same boat. ๐Ÿ™

    Still, we’ve had about 5 winters’ worth of mud in the last 18 months, and I’ve ridden a shed load of miles, so it’s a case of suck it up I think.

    LoCo
    Member

    Metal shims, have ones down to 0.1 mm and various sizes and heavy duty thread/stud lock to hold in place.

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    Hmmm…. sounds interesting. I’ve ordered a pair of rockers from Silverfish, but may give the shims a go on the DW-Links when they go (which I’m sure is going to be pretty soon, they’re *only* ยฃ120 a set) ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    The missus is going to kill me, saving for wedding isn’t being helped!

    @Samunderhill – How much did Greg charge for the rockers Sam?

    Loco

    would you machine them to fit the ‘hole’ or just blank it off and use the thread lock as a filler?. If the former how and if the latter would you not have to bend the rocker out (a tiny bit)? Genuine Q’s – I knacker loads of stuff like this

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    I’d not be using the threadlock as a filler, it’d just be to hold the shim in place. Any machining would be to get the right diameter for the bolt to fit through, the closer the fit, the less chance of movement.

    You’d want as much of the bearing surface in contact with the shim, as it would distribute the load better.

    You shouldn’t need to bend the rocker out if you use the right size shim ๐Ÿ™‚

    I’ll let LoCo give a proper engineering response though ๐Ÿ˜‰

    LoCo
    Member

    Would use one of the correct OD, ID and thinkness and bond into place, it’s worth a try and should work.

    Macgyver
    Member

    ahh, had a similar thing with the main pivot of a Mk1 Yeti ASR. Over 10 years the bushings wore the main frame just like your rockers. Ultimately a friend machined a new oversize bush for me on his lathe but the stop gap method was shims cut from coke/tonic cans with a beam compass/scapel. Worked quite well too althought fairly soft aluminium so lifespan was short in muddy weather. Cheap to replace though and a good excuese for a G&T
    ๐Ÿ˜€

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    Hi chaps,

    I’m pretty sure these are for the emergency spares box, but what do you reckon to the rockers from the 5-Spot? They mate up to bushings, and obviously they’ve been run dry, either by being pressure washed during their life, or not being greased up.



    There’s play in both sides, on the rocker tip, and at the seat tube pivot ๐Ÿ™ New bushings would fix the problem, but I’d need to file down the new pivot itself, as the wear means the bushes sit *in* the rocker arms…

    Cheers

    Ricks

    andysredmini
    Member

    Have a look around the web and you will find this is a common problem on certain DW linkages. A friend has the same problem on his Iron Horse Sunday. Its a terrible design flaw that they changed on later models with a revised linkage.
    My mate solved it with some custom plastic washers but they don’t last long. I think he has given up trying now and just accepts the play and will ride it until it dies.
    When you look at the design it obvious what was going to happen. What were they thinking putting it into production.

    Another friend has suffered a similar problem on the back end of his carbon lapierre Zesty. Again terrible design which we solved temporarily by cutting some shims from an old milk bottle.

    Andy

    ti_pin_man
    Member

    yep, I concur… I think Status Quo are defo ready for the bin

    … boom boom.

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    Well… I don’t agree with that statement. The kevlar bushes should wear a lot faster than anodised aluminium, that’s the point – the bushes wear, the frame doesn’t. This works perfectly well for shock bushes.

    The problem is when they’re not lubed, so friction is increased, which will eventually cause wear. It just takes some numpty to pressure wash the links, or to not follow simple maintenance routines for this to occur.

    I bought the frame as a third owner, so absolve myself of all blame ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon sam_underhill
    Subscriber

    The rockers were discounted (maybe because I was buying a full rebuild kit at the same time?). So they were just under $100 for the pair.

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    I was thinking about this last night, the shims wont work in my case, as the wear is uneven, so they’d sit at a slight angle, which would cause more wear on other parts of the linkage.

    Premier Icon granny_ring
    Subscriber

    How much did they charge for postage Sam?

    steviecapt
    Member

    depends if you have a nice friend with access to a machine shop, oversized bushes, re-machine the arms,and if needed a couple of shims, ive done similar for friends, but then im a tool maker by trade.

    I thought this thread would be about the rolling stones . . .

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