Working from home

Home Forum Chat Forum Working from home

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 47 total)
  • Working from home
  • Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    Brill..

    Don’t think theres much more to say.

    Do you like riding bikes?

    Lunchtime brings a whole new meaning to “just popping out”

    Premier Icon DaveRambo
    Subscriber

    I have times when I’m working from home a lot.

    The best part is the flexibility, having a lunchtime ride, nipping to the shops etc.

    I like being able to make my own lunch, drink my own coffee in my own mug (which tastes better at home even if you take them into the office)

    I tend to work more, as I don’t have the distractions so often lose track of time which means I set alarms to remind me to have some lunch as I often forget.

    I guess it will depend on your company / job and how you cope with not having to talk to idiots colleagues on a daily basis.

    edward2000
    Member

    I love the Daily Mash

    I work from home pretty regularly (twice this week with a day in Scotland and 2 days in the office). Twice a week is my limit – anymore than that and it drives me mad – too many distractions from work like the xbox, the fridge, bikes, garden etc.

    You have to really get into the mindset that you’re there to do work as opposed to being in the office where I find I can get loads more work done.

    mst
    Member

    Done it for over 14 years now. It does help that one of my good mates also works from home (for the same company) so we talk alot more as opposed to sending emails.

    Just off out for a ride…..

    Yep, looks pretty good to me !

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    [video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGg1567fzTY[/video]

    Edit: bah JoB beat me to it.

    So I’ll answer the OP instead. I did it for a couple of years. It was good but required a lot of discipline.

    I still work on my own but I’m now in a serviced office space, as working at home became impossible with kids around. I think I like this set up better though it still requires a lot of discipline otherwise you find yourself spending all day blabbering away on inane forums…

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    It’s like anything else with good and bad sides. You don’t waste hours of your life commuting. You have more control of your own time – nip out for a lunchtime ride if the weather’s good for example, and catch up later,and you don’t have to put up with office noise and distractions.

    That said, if you’re sociable, it can be quite solitary and you may conceivably not speak to anyone all day. You need to be quite self-disciplined to just get on with stuff, some people can do that, some can’t and the flipside of that is that you can end up working harder than you would in the office. You need to be able to shut the door to your office at the end of the day and stop.

    I also have a sort of moral issue with illness – there are days when you wouldn’t think of going into an office, but you can still conceivably work at home. I try not to on principle.

    In an ideal world I’d pop into the office a couple of days a week, but on balance I’d far rather work from home. If you are someone who struggles with solitude, have a think about ways you can engineer some social interaction into your day – maybe a cafe lunch or meet up mid-morning with similar home-working friends etc. Even a phone call can help on that front.

    Anyway, gotta go. Breadmaker needs priming and then there’s sunshine and a beckoning cross bike… 🙂

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Mrs Binners works from home a couple of days a week. I’m not questioning her attitude or productivity, but the house is always immaculate, and my tea is always ready when I get home 😀

    When I worked from home, I was fitter than at any time in my adult life (not a high benchmark, if I’m honest), due to the mileage I was getting in on the bike. 2 hour lunchtime ride? Why the hell not?

    pondo
    Member

    When we had big snow a couple of years ago our team pretty much WFH for the week. I had to go in on Friday, it was doing my head in being on me tod all day long.

    jamiep
    Member

    Not withstanding the regular, frequest ‘fridge checks’, the amount of toast I would eat in a day…….

    edward2000
    Member

    Anyone work from home? Whats it like? Solitude? No more terrible commutes? Tell me everything

    Thanks

    Ed

    Premier Icon chvck
    Subscriber

    BigBlackShed wrote:

    Only people who work from home will understand.

    haha some of those are pretty accurate. 1 thing that I’ve found is that when I do actually go into the office I find myself talking to myself and people seem to look at you funny as you’re doing it.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    I don’t often work from home, so it’s a pleasant change. However, I feel wracked with paranoia if I leave my laptop for long enough that my Lync status changes from “available” to “away”. Even when it wouldn;t bother me in the office.

    However, new role at work will mean more time spent away from home, so I’m going to use more of the remaining time to work from home as well for the dad-doing-the-school-run win.

    MrSalmon
    Member

    I could work from home a couple of days a week, but generally I don’t, mainly because:

    -I don’t really like being in our flat all day
    -If I don’t ride to work I likely won’t get much exercise
    -Can’t work as effectively with colleagues (even with all the tools)
    -I have a better setup at work (2 big monitors, better machine)
    -The working day can get very short pretty quickly, by the time you just do a few chores, pop to the shops, start thinking about dinner for when MrsSalmon gets in etc. A 2 hour lunchtime ride for me would pretty much wipe the day out! (See lack of exercise above)
    -Lack of human contact can get a bit depressing.

    I expect if I started to do it routinely I’d get better at it, more disciplined or whatever and could maybe then fit in runs, rides etc.

    I’d say it also depends on where you live (your view could be different if you had, say, the Peak District on your doorstep rather than the middle of a city), how annoying going in to the office actually is, and what your setup at home is. For me it’s the living room table which sort of sucks, in a previous house there was a little study/office room that was much better- could literally shut the door on it and not go in there till the next day, rather than just closing the laptop and moving stuff off the table.

    Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    I work from home all the time and apart from the odd day when I travel now think it’s great.

    It is very isolated and you do miss out on a lot that is happening in the department at HQ but if the management are switched on they’ll realise this and keep you in the loop.

    We also have a Skype chat amongst all our engineers to keep everyone chatting and in on the jokes and gossip.

    olddog
    Member

    No commute good. Flexibility good.

    Lack of sociability bad. I enjoy working with people and all my friends also work it town so easy to meet up for coffee, lunch, post work beers.

    Needs lots of discipline – too much temptation to do other stuff – especially when the sun is shining on a warm summer’s early afternoon in late June…

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Mrs Binners

    Binnina?

    Premier Icon barkm
    Subscriber

    I feel wracked with paranoia if I leave my laptop for long enough that my Lync status changes from “available” to “away”

    Yeh I have that problem too. Signing in to Lync in the morning is like clocking in, I think the ‘away’ threshold is set by corporate and cannot be changed (for obvious reasons I guess), but I’ve found tolerances for showing ‘away’ as a known home worker are basically zero.

    I think most of our work force is mobile now, I’m what’s called ‘site based’, so I have no base office location, just work where I need to (client sites or home). In reality this means 90% of my time at home. The cynic in me suggests this is a neat workaround for my employer to avoid the costs associated with me being an actual home worker, as I apparently am not entitled to anything other than my laptop and phone.

    Worked like this for years now. Biggest advantage to me is flexibility. But it isn’t all long lunchtime rides in the sunshine and commute avoidance. The winters are long, dull and really quite lonely as a home worker. School holidays are an issue if you have kids, and I have to continually remind people I do actually have a job, so will not be able to collect/deliver their shit. I prefer to work with people when I can, so make excuses to visit HQ at least once a week to try and stay sane.

    Philby
    Member

    I’ve been self-employed and have worked at home for some 12 years, but obviously don’t have the need to report into some remote corporate organisation.

    When it’s good it’s great – flexibility, able to get to do things when you want, pop out for a ride or coffee if the weather’s nice, have late nights in midweek, not having to think about what to wear or have to brave a downpour on the commute. I can do work when I feel like it – I quite like doing reports etc. late into the night as I often do my best work then. You don’t have to suffer annoying work colleagues or listen to the latest office bickering.

    However it can be very, very lonely particularly if work is scarce (as it is at the moment for me – thanks Gideon for annihilating the budgets of most of my clients :evil:), and not speaking or seeing anyone all day is not good for the mind or soul. In past jobs I have always liked the feeling of being part of something, and having colleagues to ask their opinion on some work-related problem or idea can be a big benefit. I’ve found my flat is always messy as I’m there all the time, and papers get all over the place – I don’t have the facility to have a separate room to work in and close the door on, so all my work is done in the living room. As a freelancer I never know when the next piece of work, and therefore money, is going to come from.

    For me the ideal would be working maybe a couple of days at home and the other days in the office so you can benefit from both and hopefully minimize the downsides.

    bigG
    Member

    I work from home a fair bit, basically if I’m north of the border I’m working from home. Other than having to reign in the….. sorry just finished a really good conference call.

    Basically, it’s great. Lets me make my own hours pretty much, spend time with the kids, drop them off at nursery, cook dinner at a time we can all eat together etc and still do a days work. Just at different times of the day.

    You will need to budget for an increased spend on coffee / tea, biscuits, electricity, a decent desk and chair, lunch and wet wipes. But you are saving money on a commute so unless you have a really successful week you should still save money.

    Premier Icon dknwhy
    Subscriber

    I do flexible working so I work compressed hours, have Thursday as a “work smart” day off and work from home on a Tuesday. this mean I go into the office 3 times a week.
    I like it and think productivity is fairly balanced. Can’t say I work as hard as if I were at my desk and it’s easy to get distracted but I also don’t get put upon with unnecessary stuff or caught up in office politics which means I actually get as much done as I would do at work.
    We have MS lync so I log on when I get up but have disabled the “away” feature.
    VPN access can be a pain as things seem to run slower, despite having really fast broadband at home.
    You do get cynics giving you the wink and the old, “shirking from home” comments but I know how much I contribute to the team so I just tend to ignore it.

    john_drummer
    Member

    4 days a week Wfh for me. Love it, beats commuting. Only have 30 mins for lunch so no lunchtime rides for me but what the hey. Need to login to cisco and show “available” but I can tweak how long before it shows me as “away”

    mind you I am now on holiday for 9 days.

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber

    Not been told I can officially, but do sometimes. Not for more than a few hours though. I handle childcare, so tend to squeeze the rest of my duties in as & when. Usually do an hour late at night, or early morning. Breakfast for example, I’ll log on & do some emails, while the kids are coming to life. If I have to get my head into something I find it easier in a quiet house, but I do prefer being in the office.

    footflaps
    Member

    I like the structure of going into the office. If I WFH, I’d be endlessly doing non work things like DIY….

    busydog
    Member

    Have worked at home for 10 years now, so wouldn’t know how to act in an office. As several commented in the thread, it does take some self-discipline. I find that, when business needs dictate, I actually work longer hours from home. Also find myself logging on to the work digital-desktop many times over the weekend and spending time answering emails, etc.

    MrNice
    Member

    It does depend on what you’re doing when you’re working and whether being at home will mean not hearing another human voice all day (Jeremy Kyle doesn’t count). I spend big chunks of every day on teleconferences so I’ve done enough talking outside of them. I’ve also got the box-room set up as an office which helps a lot with discipline.

    I don’t actually work with anyone in the same office as me so I’ve often wondered how long it would take for someone to notice if I moved abroad without saying anything. I reckon so long as I kept appearing online at the right times it could be some weeks…

    EDIT: to answer the original question – if I don’t spend time commuting there’s at least a chance I’ll get an extra ride in. for a while when work was less manic I used to go bouldering (indoors) at lunch. Overall, for me, it’s great. Might not be so good if I had kids to be distracting, mind.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    It’s like anything else with good and bad sides. You don’t waste hours of your life commuting. You have more control of your own time – nip out for a lunchtime ride if the weather’s good for example, and catch up later,and you don’t have to put up with office noise and distractions.

    That said, if you’re sociable, it can be quite solitary and you may conceivably not speak to anyone all day. You need to be quite self-disciplined to just get on with stuff, some people can do that, some can’t and the flipside of that is that you can end up working harder than you would in the office. You need to be able to shut the door to your office at the end of the day and stop.

    I also have a sort of moral issue with illness – there are days when you wouldn’t think of going into an office, but you can still conceivably work at home. I try not to on principle.

    In an ideal world I’d pop into the office a couple of days a week, but on balance I’d far rather work from home. If you are someone who struggles with solitude, have a think about ways you can engineer some social interaction into your day – maybe a cafe lunch or meet up mid-morning with similar home-working friends etc. Even a phone call can help on that front.

    This.

    I tend to be disciplined about snack and lunch times. Although is very easy to be distracted by the telly, biscuits, the tendency to want to fit bike parts as soon as they arrive. I am conscious that despite he odd turbo session/lunch ride I put my hours in as my arrangement is prove ledger not formal. The door to the office needs to be shut when the kids come home from school.

    I travel about a bit for work so that breaks the week up.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    A question for the genuine home workers – those that are formally contracted to work at a “home office”;

    Are there any employment benefits – Wifi contributions, that kind of thing?

    hooli
    Member

    I do 2 to 3 days a week at home and will really struggle to go back to 5 days in the office when the time comes.

    I am not as productive at home though so need to make it up on my in the office days.

    badnewz
    Member

    Suit me down to the ground. As long as you make sure you have something social planned for every other day, like a bike ride with mates, or session down the pub. Preferably bike rides.

    steve-g
    Member

    The 6am episode of Homes under the Hammer is not a new episode, its just a repeat of the previous days 10am episode

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Part time working from home. It’s tough, takes a lot of discipline to keep working sometimes. The up and down side is if it’s slow or I hit a mental wall I can go and do something else for a bit. It also means I can end up doing other stuff for a bit too long. Fork service over lunch etc. But I find its much harder to switch off and stop in the evenings.
    I have a dedicated office/store room but as it’s winter I’m working in the living room with the heater on.

    Apart from that you can get stick for not doing the shopping, washing, dishes etc.

    I also head out on Friday by 4pm to meet some people for post work beers to try and end the week. That is a lot to do with having moved to the other side of the world and not quite having the social structures I did or the office banter to help with human contact. Some days I talk to the cats and that is it, it’s not good as they can’t code.

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    now in a serviced office space

    tell me more

    Premier Icon pictonroad
    Subscriber

    I have a 2 year old, working from home does not exist. Shame, as my employer offers it and most people take the offer at least 1 day a week. There is no part of the house or garden he cannot get within ear splitting shouts of “Daddy” the second I pick up a phone.

    I have to drive the car to the end of the road to make phone calls if I happen to be caught at home.

    Premier Icon Yak
    Subscriber

    I work from home – school hours only and if anything else needs doing then it gets done after about 9pm when all the faff is done.

    Good:
    Maximise the work day. Its short enough anyway, so removing the commute makes the most of it.
    Flexible timings. I can catch up in the evenings if I have to go out during the day for any reason.
    Near the kitchen!

    Bad:
    The broadband is a bit slow here, so once I connect in via a vpn, then its very slow for big file transfer
    Not quite as easy to bounce ideas around, so I need to make an effort to be more self-critical.
    Discipline – try not to let too much stuff interrupt.

    But it suits us and makes the most of my available work time.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 47 total)

The topic ‘Working from home’ is closed to new replies.