Wood Burning Stoves

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  • Wood Burning Stoves
  • PrinceJohn
    Member

    Why are these seen as the current must have accessory?

    There seem to be loads of threads on here about them at the moment.

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    i burn winter tyres in mine.

    I live in an old house that would have had (at least) two open fires/stoves originally. Made sense to reinstate them in the front room and kitchen/dining room.

    Plus it means you can have a log pile which creates a nice focal point for taking pictures of your rarely used Orange Five.

    ocrider
    Member

    Turf and innertubes create a proper rustic olde worlde smell

    Premier Icon cb
    Subscriber

    I’m still saving for the Audi and Orange 5 but the stove arrived this morning…

    Premier Icon SaxonRider
    Subscriber

    In preparation for the apocalypse, I want to be sure that I can heat my house/cook my food when the grid gets knocked out.

    soobalias
    Member

    combination ideals, self sufficiency, economy and ambiance/interior design

    they look like they are more efficient and easier than an open fire, but everyone ignores that they are less efficient and much more hassle than decent central heating.

    its a bit like HS2, the arguements ‘for’ vary depending on who you speak to.

    where i live has no mains gas, no space for gas/oil, so its electric heating or the stove.

    soobalias
    Member

    but i drive an unnecessary 4×4

    Premier Icon maxray
    Subscriber

    More threads as we are approaching colder weather I would guess.

    We got our stove about 6 years ago and it is still the best thing we have bought for the house.

    Efficiency aside I love the feeling of sitting by a real fire.

    everyone ignores that they are less efficient and much more hassle than decent central heating

    Times a squillion.

    But, you can burn stuff in them, with flames and everythin.

    Try that with a 95% efficient condensing gas boiler.

    bokonon
    Member

    My wife made me do it – I agreed on the basis that if we were going to have it, then it would be zero cost for fuel, if we start paying for it, then it becomes more expensive than putting the heating on. It burns builders off cuts, pallets and so on (that we get for nothing) and there is a stack of wood we got for free seasoning out the back in a suitably agricultural looking wood store (made from bits that I had lying around).

    5thElefant
    Member

    Bling for the middle-aged (and an excuse to play with axes and chainsaws).

    trail_rat
    Member

    has it become fashionable ? maybe down your way

    where im at it was never fashionable – just a way of life,

    my grandads dad had one in his hut in the woods (he was a wood cutter at crathie) my grandad had one in his house , my dad had one in his house and ive got one in mine……

    they are much more efficient than the tumble drier at heating the house AND drying the clothes at the same time (not that we have a tumbledrier) and im on oil.

    5thElefant
    Member

    has it become fashionable ? maybe down your way

    My way? No, all farmers around me. They’ve got better things to do than mess around with log burners. They use oil.

    Around virtual here. Yes.

    grum
    Member

    they look like they are more efficient and easier than an open fire, but everyone ignores that they are less efficient and much more hassle than decent central heating.

    They’re good if you can get wood for cheap or free, not so great otherwise.

    crankboy
    Member

    There is nothing like a real fire to sit and watch with a glass of wine/beer on a cold night. Not sure staring at a radiator contemplating the meaning of life would be the same.

    Our house was designed to be heated by a fire and having one works well and circulates the air reducing the damp in an otherwise shonkily built interwar quasi Bauhaus semi.

    I get to play with axes timber and matches.

    They work in power cuts.

    They kick out a massive amount of heat when you want them too.

    Not even James Bond pulls laying in front of a storage heater in his boxers .

    Premier Icon igm
    Subscriber

    My 70-80% efficient 7kW wood stove means we aren’t running he 88% efficient 24kW (non-condensing) gas central heating, so it’s close on efficiency.
    Central heating is only noticeably more efficient if you want to heat every room.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Don’t forget shaving with old fashioned foam and a rusty kitchen knife, spending £500 on welly boots and wearing tweed to go cycling.

    Premier Icon bedmaker
    Subscriber

    Mine’s only 27.5% efficient but it really seems to make the flames come alive

    PrinceJohn
    Member

    See we’ve got one & it’s the bane of my life – I hate it, we get free wood, but I’d still rather have central heating – get home late to a cold house, wake up the house is cold, get home after a night ride the house is cold. Get it going, the living room is lovely, but the rest of the house feels cold, especially the bedroom round bedtime…

    johntheboy
    Member

    We have one cause we can!

    Premier Icon bedmaker
    Subscriber

    See we’ve got one & it’s the bane of my life – I hate it, we get free wood, but I’d still rather have central heating – get home late to a cold house, wake up the house is cold, get home after a night ride the house is cold. Get it going, the living room is lovely, but the rest of the house feels cold, especially the bedroom round bedtime…

    We’ll have none of that around here thank you very much!
    *reports post*

    trail_rat
    Member

    is it your only source of heat – do you live in 1849 ?

    i like it but as for a sole source of heat – poke that.

    khani
    Member

    No excuses here, I just like em, so I got one,
    A bit like my bike(s)..

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    The efficiency argument always begs the question “efficient in terms of what?”

    Fuel cost?
    Non-renewable CO2?
    Time?
    Fuel to heat conversion?

    Relative efficiency for each of those then depends on your circumstances
    Source of wood fuel?
    Time and effort available?
    Quality of installation/performance of appliance?

    Generally speaking if you are not on mains gas, have the time to process your own fuel, can source cordwood locally and have a relatively modern wood burner then for most measures of efficiency you will do better than central heating. If not then it’s something nice to have and do.

    Coal, oil and logs. It’s all making a comeback…….

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