Wood burning stove

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  • Wood burning stove
  • Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Thinking of getting a wood burning stove for our living room. It's 14' by 12', with high ceilings and a bay window. We have central heating too, so it's just secondary heating the main living room and won't be expected to heat the whole house, but if it reduces the boiler's on-time that'd be great.

    We live in a smokeless zone, so would need to meet those requirements.

    To go in here:

    Any advice on where to look for more info/prices?

    Olly
    Member

    weve got one, its dead good.

    where are you?

    pendlechris
    Member

    You have to have certain clearances round the stove, a good start would be a company called AB Milligan in Burnley, they are really good, not sure what area you are from, but they are worth a call, we live in a smokeless zone, but there are alot of different coals you can use, get one you wont regret it…

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Thanks Too Tall, I'd never have found a bunch of websites without that help 🙄

    Olly, in the North East.

    Premier Icon geoffj
    Subscriber

    Stove
    Assuming your ceiling is 3.2m, you need a 3.5kw stove (hxwxl)/14 (in Metres). Probably go for a 4kw one.

    We've just changed ours and gone for one with a larger glass front, which seem much more efficient than our previous one. Squirrels are good – as are a load of niche brands, which will arrive shortly I'm sure.

    We got ours from here: http://www.stovesareus.co.uk/

    You will need to line the chimney – here are the details of a quote I've just received. It obviously depends on height, and how handy you are with welding gear:

    7 metres 6 inch stainless steel liner 904 grade £ 67.00 £ 469.00
    6-5 inch adaptor £ 29.48
    5 inch x 2' stove pipe £ 30.00
    5mm steel plate £ 30.00
    steel angle £ 30.00
    sand and cement £ 6.00
    8 bags leca £ 9.80 £ 78.40
    tile cement for hearth slab £ 10.00
    consumables £ 10.00

    Materials sub total £ 692.88

    Labour £ 400.00

    Total £ 1,092.88
    VAT £ 103.93

    Total £ 1,196.81

    brant
    Member

    Morso Squirrel.

    Though we had a Dovre once, and I loved that – this little one would fit nicely.

    http://www.dovre.co.uk/html/woodburning-stove-250.html

    TooTall
    Member

    My link seems to meet your criteria of where to look for more info/prices. It is where I started my research on the 2 stoves I've previously fitted.

    Most Clean Burn stoves will be able to burn wood as well as coal/coke in a smokeless zone. Multi fuel rather than wood burning is the best answer.

    You will need to line the chimney

    not necessarily but it does depend on the chimney in question, although most installers will tell you that you do need to and will be only too happy to let you pay them for the work!

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Our room is that size I reckon your house is a pre-war semi same as ours. We have a Morso Badger heats the whole house with no effort at all, even in the -5 temps and less we've had of late. The rooms are still pretty good in the morning for a few ours 2 and takes no time to get going again.

    Your good bit further south than me but if you wanted to check out and were in the area your welcome too.

    Best thing we did was putting this in no need for central heating on, sat here in a t-shirt again and it's very toasty.

    Came from Fireonline iirc.

    markenduro
    Member

    We've got a portway on order, less than 5kw so does not need additional ventilation, just got to knock the fireplace about a bit now to fit, it's replacing an open fire so not too much hassle. Most of the multifuel stoves are approved for use in smokeless areas when burning wood or smokeless fuels and are a bit more efficient.

    Premier Icon domino
    Subscriber

    Mike replied on twitter also – before and after shots of ours, similar sized area to yours I reckon.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Thanks for all the replies and hints and tips.

    We've a fair bit that needs doing to the house (just a rewire, roof repairs, flooring, kitchen, insulation, windows…) so we'll see what's left in the kitty after those.

    I'm also pondering putting it in the back room, instead of the front. That has doors into the front room, hall and kitchen extension, so heat from there would spread to the rest of the house better. That would mean a bigger stove though, and the chimney breast has been removed from there and the bedroom above, so would be more expensive. Less cosy too, though more practical.

    jond
    Member

    >>before and after shots of ours

    Aaagh !
    Deco fireplaces are an acquired taste – particularly that colour 😉 – but a bit of a shame you ripped it out IMO..

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Hmmm think I have some pics ours somewhere, forget the before shot though.

    saladdodger
    Member

    Too Tall

    Sorry I have to dissagree about the multi fuel stove bit. I have a 4kw hunter Hawk stove and it was pants as a multi fuel stove the burning chamber was too small and it burnt through wood realy quickly.

    So I converted it to a woodburner only by getting shot of the grate assembly( it is a hunter conversion ) the chamber is now about 40% bigger we get more heat out of it and it can almost burn through the night

    IMHO If you are going to burn wood get a wood burner not a multi fuel stove

    Premier Icon geoffj
    Subscriber

    salad – enlightenment! It was a Hunter Hawk we replaced for the reasons you mention. I wish I'd thought of taking the grate out 🙄

    petestuart
    Member

    Call a chimney sweep in first to get opinions on condition of chimney before deciding on lining it etc. Although if you dont line it you might not want to tell building control – I'm guessing you're not miving soon though having just moved in!

    We have a similar sized room and a similar purpose (secondary heating etc). We needed no lining according to the sweep – so I installed it all myself. Meant we could afford a posh hearth too so we got an old billiard table slate cut to fit the chimney breast! Beautiful!

    Got a Charnwood Country 4, its great looking and very, very hot. Its currently blazing away now – 4Kw is just fine for us. Thats with no door on the room either so the heat spreads throughout the house. Doesn't heat the whole house but the heat of the lounge with the stove in does not suffer for the lack of doors – if that makes sense..

    To back up some of the above – we're burning wood. Not sure what the implications are for smokeless zones – smokeless coal? Therefore can't comment on the output of a 4Kw stove with smokeless coal. Most wood burning stoves can be made multifuel stoves by adding an optional grate though.

    5lab
    Member

    whats the advantage of a wood burning stove over just having an open fire (with, presumably, smokeless fuel on it)? more efficient? less hassle?

    I'd think i'd miss the open flames??

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    I have a multifuel and it works fine and dandy burns all night with logs, so guess you should a hunter hawk.

    saladdodger
    Member

    slab

    efficientcy is the word

    A open fire 20% heat into the room 80% up the chimney

    A good woodburner 75% into the room 25% up the tube

    bugger all ash due to efficient burning so less cleaning

    you can still see the flames

    also your wood in the burner lasts 4 times as long

    sorry thats about all

    CountZero
    Member

    Plus wood is a nice replenishable source of heating. Ash is one of the best woods for burning, I've got a list somewhere in a book called “Red Sky At Night", all about country sayings and ways. Never, ever burn pine, apple is very good as well, but there's others. I'd love to have a house with a wood or copse out back to harvest my own fuel from. Lots of fun with sharp axes and saws!

    Slogo
    Member

    nothing like the crackle of a wood fire

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Scotch Fine burns ok it's not great but burns well enough. I find the Birch I have at the minute is one of the best loads of heat and burns for ages.

    aP
    Member

    Such a shame about that lovely 30s fireplace. Oh well.

    I agree, it is a shame about the fireplace. On the other hand however, I wouldn't have it in my house either!
    Just about to knock my old chimney breast about and install a log burner too. Can't wait, well excited about it. Would've been nice to have had it over xmas though.
    Doing everything myself, no liner required either so the chimney breast upstairs should warm the bedroom too.
    Making my own hearth out of beige porcalain, same for the inside me the opening.

    TooTall
    Member

    saldddodger – I am well aware of the differences in burning solid fuel compared to wood ie air flow under or over. I installed proper multi fuel stoves with proper grates that could be moved depending upon the fuel being used – by lever rather than howking out the grate. What you now have is a manual multi fuel stove because you have the grate for either. You installed a stove for solid fuel, then bought the adapter. I bought with it built in.

    Funky – a liner might not be needed but it might be advised – you'll get condensation and the heating and cooling of the current chimney might bring you some cracking.

    tankslapper
    Member

    I have a Stovax 4.9kw model stunning. Complies with clean air areas etc. the biggest issue you will face Mike is securing decent firewood. You need seasoned wood, at least two seasons old, that has a moisture content of 25% or less. More than this and you will end up tarring your chimney up.

    I'm involved with a forestry forum elsewhere, if you need me to ask I can enquire about decent wood in your area

    Cheers
    TS

    Dales_rider
    Member

    How are you going to run a woodburner in a smokeless zone.
    There are people who will complain believe me.
    Multifuel and a Morso Squirrel is my choice, and has been for 25 years now.

    tankslapper
    Member

    I don't live in a smokeless zone and they complain anyway; never seem to smell coal fires tho' 👿

    Still it's cold enough that'll take some of the old whiners out……we live in hope! 😆

    timberjack
    Member

    got a clear view, expensive but really good

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    the biggest issue you will face Mike is securing decent firewood.

    I have plenty of garden space to store and season my own wood, so shouldn't be an issue once I build up a stock. Thanks for the offer though.

    How are you going to run a woodburner in a smokeless zone.

    You can get compliant wood burners, I believe.

    saladdodger
    Member

    Too Tall

    I took out the multi fuel grate ( jack of all master of none) from my 4kw hunter because to burn wood the multi fuel grate (lever operated) was a compromise for me especially with a small stove

    So I took it out and now the whole chamber is used for burning purposes so I can get more wood in therefore more heat out and a longer burn time

    btw I have bought a bigger Hunter stove for my othere place which is made as a wood only stove again because where it is going there is no shortage of wood so why compromise

    Dales_rider
    Member

    You can get compliant wood burners, I believe.

    It is an offence to emit smoke from a chimney of a building or to acquire an “unauthorised fuel” for use within a smoke control area unless it is used in an “exempt” appliance.
    There are some exempt appliances
    The Morso Squirrel being one.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    If your burner is working well your neighbours won't even notice you have it on.I live in a sensible area though no smokeless restrictions.

    Chimney is 120 years old and still in good condition. A couple of houses on the street still get regular coal deliveries!

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