Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 425 total)
  • Why our food is making us fat
  • richc
    Free Member

    I could start getting smug about being vegan if that would help.

    You missed off, but you are too weak to type.

    ourmaninthenorth
    Full Member

    my wife comes from a country where…

    Italy?

    Am I right in saying that there is now an obesity epidemic in the south? Something to do with kids now eating lunch from vending machines, rather than going home to their (now working) mothers for lunch?

    This American mentality of everyone working all the time isn’t re4ally very good for us, is it?

    xcgb
    Full Member

    I ate half a packet of ginger nute while reading that!

    xcgb
    Full Member

    I could start getting smug about being vegan if that would help.

    And the rickets makes it hard…..

    miketually
    Free Member

    Not at all. The “Recipes” function is very useful, especially with the bar code scanner. Have set up a number of regularly cooked recipes like spag bol, chile con carne, several homemade breads. Once set up they are stored for re-use. Easy.

    Lots of our food doesn’t have a barcode on it 🙂

    mogrim
    Full Member

    If you eat home cooking like people did 30 or so years ago, you should be OK

    Have you seen the crap people used to eat 30 years ago??? Boiled veg with everything, yuk. Modern home cooking is loads better!

    rkk01
    Free Member

    Lots of our food doesn’t have a barcode on it

    Point taken, esp for fruit, veg, fresh meat etc. But, my point is that it is still relatively easy to set up regular meals as a recipe and subdivide by the number of portions.

    i’m sure I will tire of it very soon – but in the meantime, myfitnesspal has been a real eye opener

    GrahamS
    Full Member

    Have you seen the crap people used to eat 30 years ago??? Boiled veg with everything, yuk. Modern home cooking is loads better!

    *thinks back to childhood*
    Hmmm… Findus Crispy Pancakes, Oven Chips and frozen peas…

    Yay for home cooking 😀

    miketually
    Free Member

    I think you have to go back more than 30 years. Michael Pollan suggests we should eat only stuff that our grandparents would have recognised as food (which is where I got my five ingredients thing from) but I’d widen that out to include other peoples’ grandparents as well.

    drain
    Full Member

    Interesting article, thanks for the link.

    A lot of it was covered in a very good (worrying) book, “Fat Land” (Greg Critser, 2003) which looked at the rise of obesity in the States and the correlations/causations with things like high fructose corn syrup and palm oil now being so prevalent in fast / prefab foods.

    The research he was referencing then had appeared in the ’90s so it’s been known for quite while now – which is why it’s plausible that lawsuits might be successful…

    Good to see some newer pieces of research also featuring. I thought the point about the tobacco industry was chilling in its cynicism.

    mogrim
    Full Member

    Hmmm… Findus Crispy Pancakes, Oven Chips and frozen peas.

    And tinned ravioli. Tried a can of it a couple of years ago, just to see what it was like. God it was awful.

    IanMunro
    Free Member

    Fray Bentos pies are still awesome though! 😀

    grum
    Free Member

    I think you have to go back more than 30 years. Michael Pollan suggests we should eat only stuff that our grandparents would have recognised as food (which is where I got my five ingredients thing from) but I’d widen that out to include other peoples’ grandparents as well.

    I doubt my grandparents ever ate quinoa or even lentils, doesn’t mean they are bad for you.

    brakes
    Free Member

    I just bought a flapjack from the work shop.
    Is it likely to be made as one would make it at home with basic ingredients, or might it contain corn syrup/ palm oil/ rendered Vietnamese children?

    miketually
    Free Member

    I doubt my grandparents ever ate quinoa or even lentils, doesn’t mean they are bad for you.

    I’d widen that out to include other peoples’ grandparents as well

    My granddad was a Scottish, truck driving smoker. Looking at his diet for inspiration would be a bit silly, but luckily there other peoples’ grandparents who ate lentils and stuff 🙂

    grum
    Free Member

    LOOK, NOBODIES’ GRANDPARENTS EVER ATE QUINOA. NOBODIES!!

    IanMunro
    Free Member

    I just had a look yesterday at the ingredients of a chicken sandwich at work.
    The fact that the ‘chicken’ had separate section for it’s ingredients wasn’t a good sign, and lo! sugar was one of them.

    miketually
    Free Member

    LOOK, NOBODIES’ GRANDPARENTS EVER ATE QUINOA. NOBODIES!!

    I beg to differ 🙂

    miketually
    Free Member

    I’d somehow never made the connection that glucose-fructose syrup was the same as high fructose corn syrup. For some reason, I thought HFCS was an American thing.

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    Grandparent’s stuff?

    Looks like it’s just spuds, milk and the odd bit of sugar beet for me then.

    I know this won’t sit well with the polarised nature of internet debates, but how about a mixture of the old and new.
    Rather than “Grandparents food was better/worse than modern food” a combination of old style home cooking, that includes ingredients they wouldn’t have had easy access to such as lentils and quinoa, plus such modern devices as juicers, steamers and George Foreman grills would be best of all.

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    MTG, we’ll have none of that sort of compromise here. Please.

    TheWrongTrousers
    Full Member

    So when the label says “Carbohydrate (10g) of which sugars (7.8g)” then what is the other 2.2g? More sugar?

    Carbohydrate comes in two forms, simple and complex. Both give energy but some are longer lasting than others and will give energy over a longer sustained period of time rather than a quick burst. The ‘quick burst’ type are the simple carbs, that’ll be your sugars. The longer-lasting type will be the complex carbs, the starches, the sort you’ll get from rice, pasta, potatoes etc.
    So in the above example, the total carb content will consist 78% sugars and 22% starches, not a great ratio.
    Nothing wrong with simple carbs as an energy source, you just need to appreciate that it will only give you a quick burst and then tail off to BELOW where you were before, this is the post-sugar rush ‘dip’. Complex carbs will last longer but not give you such an instant hit, more of a gradual burn.
    The idea is to try and combine the two in such a way that you get an instant hit followed by a sustained energy release that doesn’t dump you on the other side of the hit. This is what most energy foods like Power Bars, SIS Go Bars etc. try to do.

    Edukator
    Free Member

    An excellent article.

    Sadly on this forum some people think the answer is following a diet that eliminates fruit except one day a week.

    thomthumb
    Free Member

    mike; maybe you need to make some wwmigpe* bracelets, to hand out with kielder timing ones.

    *What would my inca granparents eat. 😉

    wrecker
    Free Member

    Sadly on this forum some people think the answer is following a diet that eliminates fruit except one day a week.

    They’re not the only ones and that’s kind of my point. Information is so conflicting; Low GI, low calorie, low fat, low carb etc etc.

    phil.w
    Free Member

    deadlydarcy – Member
    Grandparent’s stuff?

    Looks like it’s just spuds, milk and the odd bit of sugar beet for me then.

    Aren’t you Irish? Just milk and sugar beet then. 🙂

    footflaps
    Full Member

    Fray Bentos pies are still awesome though!

    I thought that until I tried one the other week – horrible, hardly any meat in it and the meat that was there was very low quality!

    mikewsmith
    Free Member

    General balanced diet
    Make food then you know whats in it (no excuses)
    Most things in moderation
    Don’t blame others or make excuses
    Take Some Personal Responsibility – I don’t see any force feeding going on

    thomthumb
    Free Member

    General balanced diet

    easy to say; more difficult to define.

    mikewsmith
    Free Member

    General balanced diet

    I know not sure how I understand it must have just appeared in my head…

    alex222
    Free Member

    General balanced diet

    just have what these guys are having

    tails
    Free Member

    It’s bloody hard work though, you have to check everything. I bought a chickpea salad the other day and thought this is nice too nice. On checking the label SUGAR! FFS!

    It is also not easy coming off sugar as the article states it is as addictive as cigarettes, which I also use. It is probably more damaging as I try to only smoke at weekends.

    Interesting saying that the fat will wipe themselves out! 😆

    miketually
    Free Member

    There was a Morrisons advert on TV last night, showcasing food that was ideal for the family to eat while watching the footie. It was almost entirely brown.

    toby1
    Full Member

    But man, sweets and chocolate and cake are sooo satisfying 🙂

    I think I need to start reading a bit more into low GI. I hate the concept of low carb and no sugar as I eat plenty of fruit to surely natural sugars are ok – in moderation of course?

    druidh
    Free Member

    alex222 – Member
    just have what these guys are having

    It worked for Mike Hall….

    grum
    Free Member

    toby1, depends how you define low GI and whose stats you believe but quite a lot of fruits appear to be ok.

    http://www.the-gi-diet.org/lowgifoods/

    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/the-gl-diet-for-dummies-cheat-sheet.html

    ourmaninthenorth
    Full Member

    we should eat only stuff that our grandparents would have recognised as food…but I’d widen that out to include other peoples’ grandparents as well.

    Let’s see

    Dad’s mum: ate very little. Always thin.
    Dad’s dad: Italian Swiss. Ate lots, mainly pasta (bad), veg (good), fruit (we’re undecided)

    Mum’s Dad: hated tomatoes. Died of complications from a stomach ulcer.
    Mum’s mum: forever dieting. Addicted to slimming pills.

    You’re right – someone else’s grandparents would be a good idea..!

    miketually
    Free Member

    I think I need to start reading a bit more into low GI. I hate the concept of low carb and no sugar as I eat plenty of fruit to surely natural sugars are ok – in moderation of course?

    Low GI and low carb aren’t the same. You can eat as many carbs as you like on a low GI diet, so long as they’re from slow-release sources.

    Fruit sugar is fructose, which is the ‘worst’ kind of sugar.

    wrecker
    Free Member

    I looked at that earlier grum. I ate some cashews yesterday. Should I feel shameful as they’re high in calories (the calorie in vs calorie out train of thought) or should I be chuffed as they’re low GI?

    Ate lots, mainly pasta (bad)

    Bad? why? It’s low fat, low GI.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 425 total)

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