why fixed?

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  • why fixed?
  • 2tyred
    Member

    I’ve been commuting 20 miles a day fixed, on a 48:16 ratio, for the past few months.

    I can now trackstand, on both the fixie and any other bike.

    I feel as if I am quite a bit faster sprinting from a standing start than before.

    I haven’t had to walk half the commute because of a ss freewheel or freehub body suddenly packing up and leaving the cranks spinning pointlessly (my route features 6 miles of crap-laden canal path and I’m no fan of cleaning).

    I’ve got brakes too because I ride in traffic and I’m not mad.

    Now I’m considering whether to take it on the darkside 100 miler I’m planning this weekend.

    I really like it, you should give it a go!

    Wibble
    Member

    +1 for enjoying fixed. Not sure why tbh, just enjoy not having to think about gears, or worry too much about cleaning. Hills really aren’t that bad either. Certainly makes you think ahead in traffic. Built up an old Raleigh a while back but it’s for sale now as getting a Tricross Singlecross to cover off/on road duties (freewheel offroad & fixed on with spare wheels).

    alpin
    Member

    when i get back on mtb it takes a moment to remember that i don’t have to pedal and that i have a rear brake….

    fixed feels different. had turned the wheel so i could use the freewheel (knew i’d be riding drunk). really didn’t like it at all. much less ‘connection’ with the bike.

    try it and see but give it time to adjust.

    kerbs still scare the shit out of me….. need to learn to hop.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    It is quite difficult to fart riding a fixie.

    It’s funny you should say that BJ, because the same thought occurred to me after a long delicious relief on the way home last night.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    I must say I don’t buy the better control in the wet. You might have to learn to control it better in the wet but your fingers are more sensitive that your feet so if you learn how to use your brakes properly then you should be able to brake safely in the wet. even in the wet your front brake should do most of the stopping anyway.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Fixed is good in traffic, it makes you time your run into a junction so that you never quite stop and then you can sprint out of the lights before the cars get going

    I do that anyway with brakes and freewheel.

    As for the wet locking up wheels thing – I don’t do that anyway. If I am applying retarding force with my legs then it’s the same as if I am braking but LESS consistent because I can only slow down on the up stroke, and for the same reason there’s a dead-spot in pedal power when pedalling at the 6 o’clock position, there’s also a dead spot in braking power at the same position. So how can it be smoother than gentle braking?

    You can slow down smoothly but not very quickly. If you can’t brake that gently without locking your wheels you’re absolutely terrible at braking. The engine braking thing on cars is different altogether – that only applies to super steep slippery slopes and it just saves the brakes a bit. Retarding force is just applied a bit more evenly – I am not sure if with modern ABS that’d even be an advantage anyway. The equivalent of that on an MTB would see you riding slowly and carefully down some muddy gully with your arse hanging back over the saddle – are you trying to tell me that’s easier on fixed?

    I think what you are talking about is an illusion. On the track it takes me a whole lap to slow down from pace – but then, I am going a fair bit faster than a commuter and in a longer gear.

    If you like it, do it – no problem with that (doing it without brakes is suicide tho) but don’t try and tell us it’s technically better or you can stop better or have more control. Just don’t believe you!

    aP
    Member

    I’m not talking about “fixie” because that’s for Hoxton tmats.
    I’m talking about riding fixed wheel, with mudguards, brakes (front and rear) and a proper gear of 66″, but then you don’t understand as you’ve never done it 😕

    MrSmith
    Member

    I can only slow down on the up stroke, and for the same reason there’s a dead-spot in pedal power when pedalling at the 6 o’clock position, there’s also a dead spot in braking power at the same position. So how can it be smoother than gentle braking?

    who said it is smoother? it’s just that you can’t lock a wheel if it’s being turned by it’s ‘engine’and if the surface changes to one with less grip(manhole cover)the wheel would instantly lock if a brake is being applied but keep turning if a fixed wheel.
    i’m surprised you have a dead spot, maybe you should work on your souplesse a bit more.

    The equivalent of that on an MTB would see you riding slowly and carefully down some muddy gully with your arse hanging back over the saddle – are you trying to tell me that’s easier on fixed?

    dunno. never ridden fixed MTB never likely too. ridden down the shiny wet ramp to a car park plenty of times on the fixed road bike though and just resist slowly as there’s a slippery metal grate at the bottom, i would have to be a lot more careful with a freewheel.

    I think what you are talking about is an illusion. On the track it takes me a whole lap to slow down from pace – but then, I am going a fair bit faster than a commuter and in a longer gear.

    i’m not dreaming it really happened i was there, have witnesses and everything. takes me a while to slow down on the tack too but then i don’t want to stop half way round as my bag is the other side of track-center, i don’t have a front brake to do 75% of the braking either.

    If you like it, do it – no problem with that (doing it without brakes is suicide tho) but don’t try and tell us it’s technically better or you can stop better or have more control. Just don’t believe you!

    who is saying it’s technically better? what is ‘technically better’ anyway?
    if you have control over a wheel in both directions is that what you mean by technically better or having more control?

    i’m happy for you that you don’t have a problem with what other people ride, it’s a nice attitude to have.

    Premier Icon Haze
    Subscriber

    It is quite difficult to fart riding a fixie

    Fartings easy, it’s not following through that’s difficult 😳

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    it’s just that you can’t lock a wheel if it’s being turned by it’s ‘engine’

    But you can stop the engine at any time. You’re applying retarding force, aren’t you – so if the tyre suddenly has less traction force than the retarding force you are applying, then you’ll skid – as demonstrated by our friend on the right —>

    So you are suggesting keeping turning the wheels to prevent skids – well fine, but the net effect is exactly the same as braking.

    i’m surprised you have a dead spot, maybe you should work on your souplesse a bit more.

    Everyone has a dead spot. Better pedalling technique lessens it, but it’s still there. Brakes on the other hand are constant all the way round unless your rim’s dinged or something.

    if the surface changes to one with less grip(manhole cover)the wheel would instantly lock if a brake is being applied but keep turning if a fixed wheel.

    If you are slamming on the anchors hard, then yes – but the same would happen on a fixie if you could apply that much braking force (which you couldn’t I bet). I never have a problem with skidding ever unless it’s a) icy or b) very very muddy off road.

    i’m not dreaming it really happened i was there, have witnesses and everything

    What happened? Were you talking about a specific case?

    who is saying it’s technically better?

    You were saying that you wouldn’t ever lock wheels when riding fixed but you would all the time when using brakes…

    MrSmith
    Member

    But you can stop the engine at any time. You’re applying retarding force, aren’t you – so if the tyre suddenly has less traction force than the retarding force you are applying, then you’ll skid – as demonstrated by our friend on the right —>

    exactly! but because the wheel is instantly moving again (fixed) it regains traction/grip quicker which means it can continue slowing the bike down. (i’m talking wet roads here)

    So you are suggesting keeping turning the wheels to prevent skids – well fine, but the net effect is exactly the same as braking.

    Yes! plus less chance of locking up over variable grip surfaces.

    You were saying that you wouldn’t ever lock wheels when riding fixed but you would all the time when using brakes…

    Rubbish. i never said anything of the kind.

    What happened? Were you talking about a specific case?

    i’m talking about when you said:

    “I think what you are talking about is an illusion.”

    i was telling you that my experiences were very real and were not influenced by drugs, hearsay, or something i read on the internet somewhere.

    they may be different from yours but just because you don’t agree with them doesn’t make them wrong.

    philjunior
    Member

    Although I’ve not tried a fixed on road, I can understand what’s being said about the braking – sometimes if I’m slowing down and changing down the gears (hence pedalling) I can feel the back wheel lock up and stop it from happening more effectively than if I was just using the brakes and freewheeling.

    Because a fixed wheel forces you to pedal all the time you are more aware of what the back wheel is doing.

    Also I agree with the suggested 66″ gear – ride about that on the road SS, have tried higher but there really isn’t much point. A lot of people seem to think spinning is a bad thing, and straining against a daft gear uphill is manly, but training your legs to be able to spin so is part of the reason to ride fixed/ss.

    ChunkyMTB
    Member

    To be excepted on this forum. I think Brant worship is the other option.

    juan
    Member

    with a 700 wheel what gearing is 66″?

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Depends upon the tyres you’re using. Have a play with http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/

    juan
    Member

    Depends upon the tyres you’re using.

    Road tyres …
    Do they come in different sies?

    MrSmith
    Member

    66 is a bit spinny but i guess if you have very big hills to climb.
    i use 73 which is fine for north downs kent/surrey riding.
    but everyones different and being a racing snake I don’t have a problem climbing in that gear.
    it’s not the uphill that’s hard work it’s maintaining 30mph on the downhills

    Premier Icon Flash
    Subscriber

    I’ve been riding one for two or three weeks now (road bike). It’s the biggest laugh I’ve had for a long time, at the moment I’m enjoying it as much as MTB off road.

    I can’t put my finger on why, but I’m now looking for longer ways home which I never bothered with on my MTB. It might just be a case of road bikes being better on the road than MTB’s, but I do enjoy the fixed aspect of the riding for whatever reason.

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 60 total)

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