Why doesn't swimming get my heart rate up?

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  • Why doesn't swimming get my heart rate up?
  • mogrim
    Member

    HR monitors don’t work while swimming? So you’re getting incorrect data?

    Premier Icon asbrooks
    Subscriber

    Take a look at this http://www.swimsmooth.com/

    I used to swim a lot (really need to get back into it), open water. I have swum most of my life and it wasn’t until I started tri-training that I realised that a lot of it is technique. The above website will explain a little. Once the technique is right, there’s no substitute for putting in the miles.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Mogrim, this one works just fine in the pool.

    Maybe it is just a need for more miles. I thought the running would be harder but this is killing me.

    mogrim
    Member

    Mogrim, this one works just fine in the pool.

    That I doubt, AFAIK there aren’t any HR monitors that work “fine” in the pool. Waterproof, yes. But reliable? No.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    But I still feel like I’m dying?

    Riding bikes for years so I expect to have to push quite hard to get my heart rate up.
    I’m new to running and that will get the heart rate up in a way that seems to relate to the effort and speed.

    However, in the pool, perceived effort says 8/10
    Heart rate says 4/10
    Speed says 2/10

    My technique could improve but looking around, there’s worse technique going 50% quicker.

    Can’t get my head around it.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    The hrm agrees with the manual method of recording heart rate. I’m swimming in a tri suit so the chest strap is holding in the correct spot.

    I’m satisfied that when the hrm says 136, I’m not actually doing 176.

    The effort feels like it but the “thumping”, while hard, is not that fast.

    mogrim
    Member

    Most (all?) HRM’s don’t work underwater, the water blocks the signal. You might be wearing it correctly, but the watch is only intermittently receiving the signal.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    A lot do suffer that problem but if the watch is waterproof (tick) a d you can keep the strap in place (tick) the Polar W.I.N.D sensor will transmit through water.
    The range is reduced but my arm never gets too far away from my chest.

    mogrim
    Member

    Bit of a google, and I’m happy to admit I’m wrong: the WIND sensor does apparently work underwater… didn’t realise that!

    One thing that I’ve long realised is that biking will never get your HR up to the same levels as running, I’m guessing that swimming (where your body weight is fully supported) would be even worse.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Ah, good point on the bodyweight issue. I’d not considered that. Despite my arms flapping around like wind turbines in a force ten, I don’t have to carry 12.5 st around.

    Premier Icon BigEaredBiker
    Subscriber

    There are many theories for the difference between heart rate, or HR, on land vs. water. According to Joanne Maybeck, who provides workshops on “Aquatic Heart Zone Training”, there are several factors. Buoyancy in the water reduces the effect of gravity. Therefore, it takes less effort for the heart to deliver oxygen to the rest of the body. Temperature may also be a factor. Compared to land-based activity, the heart doesn’t have to work as hard to cool the body. Another variable is the “Dive Reflex,” which is a neurological response that happens when the face is in the water. This triggers a reduction in heart rate and blood pressure. Some may even experience this dive reflex in chest-deep water.

    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/166752-heart-rate-during-swimming/#ixzz2YNfkoUFq

    from…

    Livestrong

    I’ve been told this before by some triathlete pals so it must be true.

    finbar
    Member

    Swim a few lengths of fly – should do the trick.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Or suffocate half way down a length.
    Fly = butterfly stroke, Really good fun but bloody knackering, and makes one hell of a bow wave

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Butterfly = drowning, forwards.

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    Your doing it wrong … technique first then the speed will come. Hiw many kentths are you doing withiut stopping,m tumble turns ? Distance swimming is definitely aerobic. Get some lessons from a competitive swimming club, ie one who has swimmers who race.

    pjm84
    Member

    Fly = butterfly stroke, Really good fun but bloody knackering

    +1 but I’m not sure I’m doing it right.

    jonba
    Member

    Are you just doing steady distance? Try intervals. 50m on 60secs or less if you can swim well. You have minute to do 50m. Anything else is resting. Do 5 or 6.

    50m sprints with set rest periods.

    200m individual medleys. Fly,back,breast, crawl. Flat out with 60s rest.

    While biking my heart rate normally goes high when sprinting or climbing. Ain’t no hills in a pool. So…

    alanf
    Member

    I’ve noticed whilst on the turbo that sitting upright will give a higher HR than if you get in the drops for no change in effort.
    Thinking about running and swimming, for running you’re fully upright so I imagine the heart has to work harder to pump the blood around as its working against gravity and for swimming as you’re horizontal it would require less effort as it’s not working against gravity as much*.
    Maybe try and set a max HR for swimming and then reset you’re efforts when in the pool. As for technique, a friend who does tri’s reckons the technique is key to getting faster.

    * This is not based on any scientific fact, so could be a load of guff.

    ajc
    Member

    Those swimming 50% faster just have better technique. The fastest swimmers at my Tri club are far from the strongest looking people. Swimming is all about technique. And to those that say riding dosnt get your heart rate up like running, you are simply not trying hard enough. have a go at a time trial and tell me your heart rate can’t get up there.

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