Why can't more bike companies have transferable frame warranties..?

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  • Why can't more bike companies have transferable frame warranties..?
  • Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Neither are especially large companies so if they can, why can’t others?

    Answered your own question there, imagine the bill if everyone who cracked a specialized or giant within 5 years came back expecting a brand new frame. It also makes the used market more attractive as a used frame can still have value which is something the manufacturers are not that keen on as it will impact on new sales.

    Premier Icon mcnultycop
    Subscriber

    Relatively speaking, per bike or frame sold, the bill would be smaller for a larger manufacturer as their manufacturing costs are likely to be considerably lower.

    So how about you take the bike in question to an authorised dealer (along with the original sales receipt of course), pay a nominal fee – say £50 – they inspect the frame and if there’s no cracks, transfer the warranty to you.

    Bike companies get more money, buyers get peace of mind. Job done.

    I only brought this up because I was considering a barely-used Enduro 29er, but with the realisation that if even a week down the line it developed a manufacturing defect, Spesh would wash their hands of it. That’s not showing faith in your product..

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    I only brought this up because I was considering a barely-used Enduro 29er, but with the realisation that if even a week down the line it developed a manufacturing defect, Spesh would wash their hands of it. That’s not showing faith in your product..

    They show 5 years of faith in their product, it’s fairly impressive in this world really. They just only offer that to the original owner.

    Turner and Nicolai do (2 and 5 years respectively) as long as the original sales receipt is passed to the new owner. Nicolai’s even includes racing.

    Neither are especially large companies so if they can, why can’t others?

    Step up big brands, stand by your product! One owner, five owners, shouldn’t matter..

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    The examples cited are relatively small and expensive brands the longer/transferable warranty is one of their USPs. of course covering future forecast warranty claims is added to their pricing, part of what makes a Turner or a Nicolai a pricier choice than the equivalent specialized or Giant…

    Quite why people are so obsessed with warranty I don’t really know, especially on used kit, if you really can’t handle the possibility of a bike breaking without some paper to wave at a dealer then just don’t buy a used bike… Just lower your expectations and buy the warranty covered bike you can afford…

    dirksdiggler
    Member

    Why would you ever buy a new bike from a bike shop then? It’d hurt retail more than the sceptics thought 650b would

    bigrich
    Member

    yeah, why can’t I buy a second hand bike, break it then expect the manufacturer to pick up the tab?

    it’s a liberty, that’s what it is. After all, if I bought a toaster at a jumble sale and it doesn’t work, tefal should give me a new one.

    FFS. you want a warranty, go pay for it. get some accidental damage insurance.

    turner and nicolai do it to differentiate from the big boys and attract sales.

    bigrich
    Member

    I was considering a barely-used Enduro 29er, but with the realisation that if even a week down the line it developed a manufacturing defect, Spesh would wash their hands of it. That’s not showing faith in your product..

    I put it into google translate from stw forum to english and it came out with this:

    “I want a nearly new bike at a fraction of the price of a new one, but also want the safety net of a warranty. I’ll rationalise this as it being the manufacturers fault.”

    n punshon
    Member

    Well there’s the irony, if you bought a used toaster from a jumble sale and it had the original receipt and was in warranty you could get it replaced. As you could with most other items, including cars, houses, watches, tele’s etc etc….. but not mountain bikes. Of course they do it to try to kill off or reduce the appeal of the used market, That’s why we lose so much if we buy a bike new and sell it after a short while. I do genuinely feel that if you warranty a product for a period of time then that should be the case even if it’s sold if the original paperwork is retained.

    bigrich
    Member

    Your statutory rights are not affected.

    Of course, the best bit is I’ve warrantied second hand frames. You just need to accept a modicum of deviousness is required.

    Rorschach
    Member

    You can buy houses from jumble sales?And get a receipt? Awesomes.

    bencooper
    Member

    A warranty is a perk – an extra inducement to buy. Would the lack of a transferable warranty stop anyone buying a new bike? I doubt it.

    matlockmeat
    Member

    Bike frame warranty should certainly be transferable.

    You only have to look at cars. Why should a bike be any different?

    The number of owners shouldn’t make any difference to the likely hood of the frame breaking so as someone said above manufacturers need to have move faith in their products.

    It’s all well and good saying they do for the original owner but that doesn’t wash with me.
    The manufacturers know that the original owner if a £2000 frame is likely to upgrade after a couple of years thus making the 3rd, 4th and 5th years warranty unlikely to be used. Sneaky really,

    antigee
    Member

    Would the lack of a transferable warranty stop anyone buying a new bike?

    depends on what you factor in for example of lot of people on here would say buy an Isla bike or a Cruiser trailer for your kids because these products have a good resale value 2nd hand

    doof_doof
    Member

    A warranty is a perk – an extra inducement to buy. Would the lack of a transferable warranty stop anyone buying a new bike? I doubt it.

    Well no, but a transferable warranty may be an incentive to choose one used frame over another,all other things being equal.

    Rorschach
    Member

    The manufacturers know that the original owner if a £2000 frame is likely to upgrade after a couple of years thus making the 3rd, 4th and 5th years warranty unlikely to be used

    Why would they care? The 2nd hand buyer has’nt bought anything from them.

    So how about you take the bike in question to an authorised dealer (along with the original sales receipt of course), pay a nominal fee – say £50[b]£500[/b] – they inspect the frame and if there’s no cracks, transfer the warranty to you.

    This /\ would work.

    bencooper
    Member

    Well no, but a transferable warranty may be an incentive to choose one used frame over another,all other things being equal

    Buying a used frame isn’t a benefit for the manufacturer – in fact in some ways it’s a cost, every sale of a used frame is one fewer new frame sold.

    matlockmeat
    Member

    When someone buys a 2nd hand car they haven’t bought anything from the manufacturer either.

    Really no one has, both industries are the same, you buy from a dealer anyway, you are not buying from the manufacturers.

    n punshon
    Member

    Warranty affects the resale value. I think there is some delusion on here that people think that a nearly new bike is bought for like half price which in reality rarely happens. So as a new bike buyer why should you care about the warranty transfer and therefore the resale value? Because what happens if you lose your job, get badly injured, can’t ride for any other reason and want to sell the bike on…. You want to get the best price back and the lack of warranty hinders that.

    bencooper
    Member

    You want to get the best price back and the lack of warranty hinders that.

    Only if every other frame apart from yours has a transferable warranty – otherwise there is no disadvantage.

    mattsccm
    Member

    Because there is no financial advantage to do so. Its really easy people.
    I really do think that the big names know a bit more about what makes them money than the average STWer.

    doof_doof
    Member

    I know plenty of people (me included) that buy a used frame before upgrading to a new frame from the same brand. It’s stepping stone.
    If you’re treated the same whether you’re the 1st, 2nd or 5th owner, then that’s the kind of company I would spend my money with time and time again.

    The manufacturers know that the original owner if a £2000 frame is likely to upgrade after a couple of years thus making the 3rd, 4th and 5th years warranty unlikely to be used

    Why would they care? The 2nd hand buyer has’nt bought anything from them.
    So how about you take the bike in question to an authorised dealer (along with the original sales receipt of course), pay a nominal fee – say £50£500 – they inspect the frame and if there’s no cracks, transfer the warranty to you.

    This /\ would work.

    Premier Icon geoffj
    Subscriber

    mattsccm – Member
    Because there is no financial advantage to do so. Its really easy people.
    I really do think that the big names know a bit more about what makes them money than the average STWer.

    Except, as has been pointed out, some do. It’s about differentiation innit.

    mikey74
    Member

    A few people have mentioned that car companies offer transferable warranties: However, most car warranties insist that the car is serviced at their official test centres, therefore they still get money if the car is sold on within the warranty period. Plus they still get money from official, after-market parts.

    How many here get their Specialized** serviced at an official Specialized** service centre and only use official, Specialized** after market parts? Of course, I do not include Specialized’s** ranges of clothing, accessories etc, which are your choice to buy, not a requirement of a warranty.

    **insert other company names as required**.

    The fact is, that after a bike is sold the first time, that is the end of the money trail, so why would they put money into something they aren’t going to get anything from?

    mikey74
    Member

    Grrr double post.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    For a small, top-end and specialist brand it may work to their advantage. For a more mass-market brand there’s little sense in offering a new frame for a broken SH one that may have been picked up cheap after a hard life, the incentive for the 2nd owner is to get a new frame somehow that will be worth more than what you’ve paid for it, relatively.
    Cars are totally different in use, faults, warranty terms etc.
    But it’s not a bad idea in principle if you have faith in your products and a low warranty return rate; if the bike has had a regular service and known history it has a higher SH value and the frame warranty adds to that.
    ‘Will investigate’.

    mikey74
    Member

    if the bike has had a regular service and known history it has a higher SH value and the frame warranty adds to that.

    And how are you going to prove that? Are you suggesting a car-style service history book and “official” service centres? Are you suggesting that all bikes are tracked using Strava-esque apps?

    The fact is that bike use is virtually impossible to keep a track of, which makes warrantying them a minefield.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    The fact is that bike use is virtually impossible to keep a track of, which makes warrantying them a minefield.

    That’s true of 1st-owner warranty now though.
    Log-books are a bit ott yes, but for some sales channels it’s possible to offer a service that records some sort of service history – brake checks mean little to a cracked headtube of course, it simply means that a mechanic has seen the bike a couple of times a year and some idea of use can be noted.

    how are you going to prove that? Are you suggesting a car-style service history book and “official” service centres?

    Pinnacle bikes (I work there) come with a credit-card sized tag that has a barcode on it. That barcode is your frame number and could be scanned at point of sale to relate customer and bike, or added to any service work charged for in an Evans store. It’s not part of a warranty requirement now but it can be useful to have that ability.

    mattsccm
    Member

    I said them. Each company is different. One would assume that the big ones know what suits them.

    Not sure that the idea of a bike being seen by a mechanic has any worth. I would take mine to anyone but me. why would I need to ? It’s a bike not a jet fighter.
    I can’t see why a warranty is anymore than a sales gimmick. After all modern bikes are virtually disposable. Everything except possible a frame is either meant to last a few months or needs servicing. How or why should that be warranted?

    To make it clear, I was talking about the warranty for the frame only. The bike in question that started me thinking along these lines is a carbon Enduro 29 – so several thousand at risk if it developed a manufacturing fault.

    Put it this way, I’ve noticed people on the Codeine thread questioning that the frame only carries a two-year warranty and actively ruling it out due to that. For a big brand to offer a transferable frame warranty, particularly on the higher end models, would sway people’s purchasing decision – especially if it meant a higher resale value when they sell on. You then foster a higher sense of brand loyalty, which is what any company wants, right?

    Gribs
    Member

    I think you’re seriously over playing the effect that a transferable warranty has on the buyers of new bikes. It’s not something I’ve ever considered and I’m betting most people buy new bikes because they want them, rather than thinking how easy will it be to sell on in a couple of years. For a manufacturer second hand sales make them no money and potentially take away a new customer so there’s no good reason to offer transferable warranties.

    Going back to cars generally the long warranties are first owner only, Vauxhall for example covers the first owner for up to 100k miles but the second owner only gets 3 years/60k miles.

    mickmcd
    Member

    what difference it makes where you get your bike serviced as with car dealerships theres some proper shit out there

    Aluminiums quite the disposable product these days and lifes of 2 years are pretty good considering the abundence of shit material thats found its way int the supply chains

    really do you think at the current state of force feeding NEW the bike is going to be current after 2 years CRC will have stuff on offer 72% off in 6 months to move stock

    antigee
    Member

    mattsccm – Member
    Because there is no financial advantage to do so. Its really easy people.
    I really do think that the big names know a bit more about what makes them money than the average STWer.

    its easy and beneficial to the big names but is it reasonable for the consumer?

    personally I’m very cynical about any market where major players have similar terms and bang on about how it is essential that their route to market is only the way

    Premier Icon richwales
    Subscriber

    What if the original proof of purchase didn’t have the buyers name? It would be transferable then?

    ryan91
    Member

    If you want a bargain then you take the chance, it’s a competitive market which is selling by the bucketload so why would manufacturers potentially shoot themselves in the foot offering something none their direct competitors do ? I have a “lifetime” warranty on my cannondale, however it’d need new wheels and shocks as there’s no direct replacement which could easily cost more than a good 2nd hand frame !

    MTB Rob
    Member

    Don’t think it work, as normally the “buyer” wants the item cheap as possible, and not welling to pay a good price for it.

    I have a pair of forks, I was going to swap from one frame to a new one, so I serviced the forks, put BRAND NEW 15mm lowers (£200rrp) on them, only to find the steerer to short.
    I Seen these forks go 2nd hand and in poor condition for £170 to £225. so put them up for sell for £300, with spare springs & new decals, and transfer the paper work for the lowers, I still got people offering me £200 to £250 for the forks! so when I say maybe but it comes with no transfer paper work etc they go and moan!

    I find out soon if people are willing to pay extra for transfer warranties etc when I put the Soul 26″ (large) up for sale!

    Also I seen in the wanted ads someone after some Pike fork (they only been out a few mths) and someone else after a go pro3, again with in a few mths of them been released! so I take it they looking to pay less than half price just because it 2nd hand?
    DO these people think the owners who spent good load of money on these products suddenly go I don’t want it any more and going to sell it for 1/2 the money I paid for it??

Viewing 38 posts - 1 through 38 (of 38 total)

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