Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 30 total)
  • Why are speaches and the like always released beforehand.
  • Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    BBC news has just read out a big chunk of what the Queen will say later today and Boris’s letter content was similarly distributed. So there’s no point in watching Liz now, and the PM’s letter will go in the recycling unopened.

    It’s always the same with big political speaches. Why? What’s the point in diluting any impact you may have like this? There must be a reason, but what is it?

    Premier Icon eddiebaby
    Subscriber

    So the proofreader can check it.

    Premier Icon spooky_b329
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    To generate media interest and therefore awareness so more people will watch/read.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    So the proofreader can check it.

    heheh, and check for spelling mistakes..?

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
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    So the proofreader can check it.

    Lolz

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    So the proofreader can check it.

    Bugger. 😁

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    To generate media interest and therefore awareness so more people will watch/read.

    Telling me the Queen will give an address on ‘x’ topic would make me watch, giving me the full content makes it Nicolas Witchell’s announcement and therefore I won’t bother. Surely I can’t be the only one like this.

    It’s like putting the final episode of a hotly anticipated drama on YouTube a week before the series is broadcast.

    ElShalimo
    Member

    I also don’t get it. Nearly every political speech is previewed the day before. There’s no point in doing the actual speech once we know the content.

    Here’s an example… “The BBC has  learned that ElShalimo will be going to his garage soon to try to fix his problematic SRAM Apex 1 shifter. Rumour has it that his hamfisted skillset will not be enough to solve the issue. Now over to Laura for the latest on Binners broken crayons”

    Premier Icon IdleJon
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    Walking on the beeches, looking at the speaches, dun-dun-dun…

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
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    Could it be to judge what the reaction is from the press/public first, which puts them on the front foot to answer field any unforeseen questions?

    ElShalimo
    Member

    Maybe but that’s cheating and not real life though is it. Controlling the narrative is never a good way to get your message across.

    I had to do a 20 minutes online presentation with Q&A to 100+ people recently. I had to be professional and prepare in advance and get ready for potentially awkward questions and be able to defend my position if challenged. If I can do it they can too

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Subscriber

    If I can do it they can too

    But they don’t need to do it, do they?

    Anyway, wgas about what the Queen says?

    ElShalimo
    Member

    Scrutiny is a dirty word to these people

    Poor old Liz2, being spoken of in the same vein

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    So there’s no point in watching Liz now

    There never was.

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    El Shalimo sort of made the opposite argument by releasing an excellent teaser without the full content.

    Can you please film your maintenance session, I want to watch that, (but be prepared for difficult questions afterwards). 😜

    ElShalimo
    Member

    @tthew – it wouldn’t get past the swear filter 😉

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    Given recent history of Liz being asked to do things by Boris Im surprised he wasnt told to poke it.

    Does seem a recent thing to announce these speaches beforehand. Boris’ one a fortnight ago is the only one I can remember that was an actual surprise, at least in the detail (we knew lockdown was coming but not that is was going to be that night or the t&c’s).

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    I also don’t get it. Nearly every political speech is previewed the day before. There’s no point in doing the actual speech once we know the content.

    With political announcements the ‘announcement of the announcement’ allows you to test the water and do a bit of back-pedalling.

    If you announce that launch X new initiative at 11am then through the morning you’ll have a variety of knee-jerk reactions form the Opposition, adversely effected groups and so on… a lawyer somewhere might even point out that ‘X’ would actually be illegal. Then when you actually make the announcement you can include a few caveats and nuances that make it seem like all people those were getting the knickers in a twist over nothing.

    Premier Icon eddiebaby
    Subscriber

    Can you please film your maintenance session, I want to watch that, (but be prepared for difficult questions afterwards). 😜

    Just download the torrent from PirateBay. Worked for me. 😉

    Premier Icon nealglover
    Subscriber

    So there’s no point in watching Liz now either way

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    It’s so they can get more effective media coverage on the day of an announcement.

    It was happening about 20 years ago, when I worked on the newsdesk at a major national news org. But it seems more widespread now, the norm even.

    Premier Icon ctk
    Subscriber

    We will fight them on the speaches

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    With politicians I’d imagine it’s so that the press can come up with good quesitons. The speech is then televised for the rest of us and we can watch the person field the questions.

    With the queen, maybe it’s so that the journos can talk about it later instead of having to frantically scrabble through their notes after she’s finished.

    Huw: That was the Queen speaking from Buck palace. Nicholas, you were at the palace, what do you make of that?

    Nicholas: Er well.. hang on a minute.. ok well that bit with the erm.. I quite liked the part about.. shit where are my notes? Bollocks.. hang on

    Huw: Nicholas! Potty mouth!

    Nicholas: Alright give me a break I fell asleep half way through, you know she goes on a bit.

    Huw: Have you been drinking?

    Nicholas: Of course, how else could I do this job? I used to do your job you know you smug git stop giving me lip

    etc

    ElShalimo
    Member

    😂😂😂😂

    Premier Icon bruneep
    Subscriber

    defend my position if challenged

    does that involve switching router off?

    Premier Icon P-Jay
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    It really depends,

    Sometimes it’s just a leak, someone leaks a few lines for a bit of a back-hander.

    With Political stuff it’s usually to test the water, more than a few times you’ll hear “the Chancellor is expected to say…” about something contentious, based on public opinion it might go ahead as expected, be watered down or cut altogether.

    Equally sometimes it’s just rumour or educated guess made up by the press for a few lines on the lead up to something.

    When it comes to the Queen last night I’d guess the Gov wanted as many people to watch as possible so bits were released to get more coverage on a busy news day.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    As well as the news telling us what’s going to happen later today the weather forecasts spend a lot of time describing yesterday’s weather.
    I’m old enough to remember when the news told us what happened yesterday and the weather forecasts told us if it was going to rain today.
    I guess the real reason for this is that we all get bombarded with developments in the things that interest us on our phones in real time and the news media aren’t yet ready to say “there’s nothing new to report so we’ll just say goodnight and stay safe”. They’re all just treading water struggling for ratings. So they just say stuff that sounds a bit like the stuff they said when they were relevant.

    Premier Icon tthew
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    Molgrips wins this thread. 🤣

    Premier Icon woody74
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    It’s ridiculous that the BBC printed word for word what the Queen was going to say in speak marks. They then sent out a Breaking News that the queen had said “this and”. We know you published it over 12 hours earlier. Bloody stupid and I can’t see any reason why. It’s the same when they announce the New Years honours days beforehand. Why!!

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    It really depends,

    Sometimes it’s just a leak, someone leaks a few lines for a bit of a back-hander.

    With Political stuff it’s usually to test the water, more than a few times you’ll hear “the Chancellor is expected to say…” about something contentious, based on public opinion it might go ahead as expected, be watered down or cut altogether.

    Equally sometimes it’s just rumour or educated guess made up by the press for a few lines on the lead up to something.

    I’d be interested to know what insight this is based on.

    I used to edit the wire stories that went out to the media. We would have the speech text the evening before and it’d be distributed in time for the newspapers to include for the next day.

    There’s a grain of truth in the “testing the water” thing, but I think that usually happens separately as politicians leak policy ideas to friendly hacks and take the temperature before they commit.

    If you sometimes see policies quickly rolled back as they get a hostile reception, that’s more likely a knee-jerk reaction rather than a planned part of the process.

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