Who knows about ski boots (fitting Q)

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  • Who knows about ski boots (fitting Q)
  • Premier Icon rockthreegozy
    Subscriber

    In the market for some ski boots, and visited two different shops last week.

    Shop 1; measured feet wtih socks on, came out as a 26.5 size wise. Didn’t find the right boot, but gave me some other suggestions.

    Shop 2; measured feet without socks, came out as a 26 size wise. Ended up in a couple of 25.5’s which felt fine- toes against the end but was assured thats fine.

    Now seeing as I’d like to get this purchase right, after last years agony I’m a bit confused as to how two shops, with “trained” staff can give different recommendations..

    Which shops ?

    Premier Icon rockthreegozy
    Subscriber

    Glasgow ones 😉

    Blues and Ellis Brigham

    Premier Icon Gee-Jay
    Subscriber

    Buy them in resort, the people there will have much more experience & you can often try them for a day first

    Premier Icon Rio
    Subscriber

    Toes against the end doesn’t sound right. Mine have enough room to wiggle my toes without touching the end of the boot. If you’re anywhere near Lockwoods in Leamington Spa give them a try.

    nbt
    Member

    “trained” = “shown how to put boots on”

    You might strike it lucky and get someone who knows what they;re talking about. Sounds like shop 1 were good in that they didn’t sell you something you didn;t want, but if they said you were 26.5 and you are happy enough in 2.5. their measuring is wildly out. I skiied in 28 for years and when I had them fitted by a recommended fitter (Frank @ Nevada sports in Tignes) went down to 26.5 and the difference was phenomenal

    ask over on snowheads for a local recommendation

    Buy them in resort, the people there will have much more experience & you can often try them for a day first

    And if you have a problem when you get home what do you do ?

    Buy them here, its really difficult i know, i went through all this last year after very nearly getting ripped off and somebody trying to sell me what they had in stock regardless of what fitted.

    i think there is a lot of mumbo jumbo around ski boot fitting, my advice is try and find somebody who speaks sense that you can trust and buy what YOU think feels best, not what they think will fit you best.

    nbt
    Member

    Toes against the end doesn’t sound right. Mine have enough room to wiggle my toes without touching the end of the boot.

    Toes against the end of the boot sounds right, if you have enough room to wiggle then your boots sound to be too big. Remember that if you adopt the correct position when skiing, your knees move slightly in front of your toes: this pushes the heel back in the boot and moves the toes back slightly

    nbt
    Member

    And if you have a problem when you get home what do you do ?

    Buy them here,

    And if you buy them here, what do you do if you get to resort and have problems. It’s a minefield, no sense in buying local if you’re not getting value for money – that means properly fitted boots.

    my advice is try and find somebody who speaks sense that you can trust and buy what YOU think feels best, not what they think will fit you best.

    Again, most good bootfitters will know what kind of boot will be the best fit your shape of foot, a good fitter will not sell you a boot if it won’t fit you.

    Premier Icon Rio
    Subscriber

    this pushes the heel back in the boot and moves the toes back slightly

    Indeed, which is why they shouldn’t be touching the front of the boot. I’m assuming that the fit is in a skiing position, if the shop tries to tell you they fit in a non-skiing position then go somewhere else.

    bazzer
    Member

    Generally if a boot feels comfy in the shop its too loose, it should not hurt but a new pair of boots will not feel like a pair of slippers if it fits properly.

    My tips would be.

    Be honest about your ability, a pair of super stiff race boots may look cool but will not be comfy for all day skiing.

    Footbeds, these can fix a lot of problems and help prevent cramping etc.

    Ask the fitter how much experience they have and if you dont trust the boot fitter dont be scared to walk away. I did on my last pair of boots in resort in Val D’Isere the first place wanted to sell me a pair of boots that were too big, I ended up in Killy Sports and my boots were great, I was there for the season and they did need a little blowing out on one boot, after that I had a perfect fitting pair of boots.

    Bazzer

    Home or in resort is tricky, resort will be more expensive most of the time if you are a punter. If you are going for 2 weeks I think it would be worth it as you would have time to get them sorted if you have an issue.

    Profeet in London are very good too but it wont be the cheapest option.

    Again, most good bootfitters will know what kind of boot will be the best fit your shape of foot, a good fitter will not sell you a boot if it won’t fit you.

    You would think that, i could give you the name of a shop where this does not apply, i have had first hand experience of it, they are “experts” allegedly and i see them recommended all over the place…….

    Me: I think these are a little on the small side, could i try a 27.5

    Them: No, its the right size, the shell does not change between a 27 and a 27.5 (this is correct in this case)

    Me: Well just out of interest i would like to put my foot in one to try

    Them: No point, they fit fine and will be better when moulded

    Me: I really would like to try as the rest of the boot feels fine apart from the toes

    Them: There is really no point in trying, they will be the wrong size

    At this point the guy, the manager BTW, was doing something else so i asked his sidekick if he could get me a 27.5 in the boot i had on, his reply “Sorry we dont have any 27.5 in stock”

    I went and bought a 27.5 elsewhere and have never been more comfortable in a ski boot, go figure….

    >Buy them in resort, the people there will have much more experience & you can often try them for a day first <

    The OP’s in Glasgow, we have 4 centres up and running with snow at the moment and there are (or were) plenty of shops in Scotland with experienced boot fitting staff. Try some more shops I’m sure you’ll find a common denominator on the foot sizing 😉

    Premier Icon paul_m
    Subscriber

    I’ll second the vote of go to Lockwoods in Leamington Spa, as they know what they are talking about.

    They fitted my boots, and when I stand upright in the boots, then the toes do (just) touch the end of the boot, when you “bend the knees” then the toes move back and the boots are fine.

    As the guy in Lockwoods told me, If you can wiggle your foot side to side a couple of millimetres in the boot, imagine that amplified down the length of the Ski.

    And a good fitting should last at least an hour, so I would’t go at the weekend if possible, and maybe even call ahead.

    The other option may be to go to one of the Snowdomes as you can often try boot’s or ski’s there if there is a shop there as well, before buying.

    legend
    Member

    – Blues (unless something has massively changed recently) fit ski boots like shoes – not to be recommended.

    – Brighams will go through the full process of recommending the right boot based on your foot shape, not just length (plus you get their fit guarantee)

    Boots should not be comfy in the shop, if they are then you’re pretty much guaranteed that after 15hrs use (this does not include sitting on a couch) they’ll have packed out and now your boots are too big. Be prepared to buy footbeds, the insoles supplied with boots are a joke (might as well be bits of paper)

    NEVER buy boots in resort. E.g. you buy boots from Brighams, you’re covered by a guarantee that they’ll do everything they can to make them fit. Buy in resort, find out that they aren’t everything they’re cracked up to be when you’re back home, are you really going to fly back to the shop? Do you think the resort fitters dont know this? I’ve known of old women with wide feet, and can barely flex a soft boot, getting recommended narrow race boots by guys in resorts. Seriously, just avoid.

    This also leads on to……never buy boots just before going on holiday! As I said, you need 15 hours (at least) in a new pair of boots to break them in, and sitting around in them does not count! So either walking around the house in them or (believe it or not) skiing locally is the way forward. Be prepared for pain and/or bruising when breaking in boots, just man-up and get on with it

    [/rant]

    kevin1911
    Member

    I bought my boots in Blues in Glasgow just a few weeks ago. I was served by a bloke originally from Michigan, and he seemed very knowledgeable and was very patient and helpful. I’ve not actually used them yet so can’t comment on how they’re sizing up after bedding in, but I have faith that the guy knew what he was doing.

    In fact, he actually used a tool thingy to measure the length and width of my feet.

    Going to book some lessons at Snozone in the new year. Can’t wait!

    Premier Icon Jerome
    Subscriber

    Need to be proper tight.
    No heel lift at all.
    Toes touching normal as when you put your knees forward this goes.
    Mine make my feet numb and would not have any other way.
    J.

    Legend – Good points, well made, but unless you actually live in a ski resort I don’t see how you solve this.

    ..never buy boots just before going on holiday! As I said, you need 15 hours (at least) in a new pair of boots to break them in, and sitting around in them does not count! So either walking around the house in them

    No way would I walk round my house in a pair of ski boots – I’d trash the floors – and few of us have local skiing in the UK.

    NEVER buy boots in resort.

    The only place I’m ever going to be able to try a pair of boots, get them adjusted, try them again is in a Ski resort. Brigham’s might give you a fit guarantee but most of us that means go on holiday for a week, go back to the shop on return, not ski in them for 12 months to find if they’re any better.

    My current pair of boots came from Brighams and they did a good job. I was thinking I’d buy the next pair in a resort but, in a final analysis, I suspect there are people who do good jobs and bad jobs anywhere. You also probably don’t want to be trying to buy a new pair of boots on the morning of the first day after changeover when the shop is mad busy.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    I disagree that boot fitters know what boot will fit you. They will have an idea which boots are narrow fitting or which are wide fitting but no more. Alot of it depends on your angle shape and calf size, and length of leg.

    IMO try as many brands as you can you will will know when you have the one on that fits your foot AND lower leg, the bit many people dont think about!

    Sizing is difficult. Shops will try and put you in the size your foot measures. I actually have always bought a size smaller. As the liners bed in the padding thins out. IMO your toes should touch the end (just), but have the ability to move up and down, when the rest of your foot should be firmley held down. I never wear thick socks, infact my boots fit that firmly I can ski with all the buckles undone with no socks.

    It makes me laugh when people try boots on in shops and stand there flexing them. You can not tell the flex of a boot in the shop at all. However generally a high end boot will be stiffer than a low end. Flexing will however show you if the boot is too small or big. When you flex forward if the pressure changes on your shin, then the boot could be too small or too big. A good fitting boot should have constant pressure across the top of your foot all the way up the front of the boot and your shin.

    Molded foot beds are essential and really improve the comfort and control.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    Profeet were not good for me 🙁 The heel cup on my custom footbeds was a thumbs depth short of the back of my heel which means that, when put in the liner, it is a thumbs depth too far back, meaning they were f’ing uncomfortable as all trough/humps/ridges were in the wrong place.

    I questioned this at the time but was assured that it was ok so I shut up as they are ‘suppossed’ to know what they are doing. I now have a thumbs depth of padding behind the insole which makes it comfortable.

    We then went to Heavenly and my mates all got booted fitted by ‘Master’ Boot fitters (i.e perfect fitting) for about 1/2 what I paid 🙁

    Warren Smith has dropped them as well saying they don’t seem to look after their clients anymore.

    So I would go for resort fitting as you can go back to the shop for ‘tuning’ as necessary – but don’t suffer any pain for long otherwise you won’t be able to make good judgements on fit anymore as you will have bruised your feet. Google around for shop and/or fitter recommendations.

    Boots should be comfortable when you are in ski position and for walking/sitting you may need to pop the front bindings for comfort.

    legend
    Member

    Interesting that we’ve had so many posts without one mention of shell checking. Anyway….

    Wouldn’t be overly impressed by the use of a tool to measure feet, Clarks have been doing that with me since I was 2 😉 As mentioned above, there’s a lot more than length and width to take into account e.g. calf size, instep, shape of toes and heel, (positioning of the malleolus if you want to be fancy) and ankle flexion. A good boot fitter will be able to take all of this into account right away.

    If you’re worried about marking your solid oak/laminate/whatever floor, just get a set of cat tracks and you’ll be sorted. Making it to a snow dome or dry slope is better of course.

    Warren Smith are an interesting mentioned, I know of one of their guys instructing a client to clamp up their boots as tight as possible. This just meant that the boot was no longer able to flex properly and gave the client all kinds of pain! Hopefully that’s just one of their instructors though.

    Also not sure, what constitutes a ‘Master’ boot fitter, that kinda sounds like a shop playing some marketing BS imo.

    Turnerguy, I really would recommend that you get to a shop and get some new footbeds made up – you’re boots must be horrendously uncomfortable!

    Mark

    Crell
    Member

    Bear with me on the length of the post 🙂 After I smashed my ankle I decided to get a new pair of boots last year because I didn’t want to risk ruining a holiday having always struggled with boots in the past. I did a bit of reading on snowheads and tried to get CEM (colin) to do the fitting. Unfortunately I didn’t have long before I travelled and he was off to support the Scottish ski team training camp for a week so it ruled him out.

    He pointed me at James who owns Outdoor Traders in Abingdon. Absolutely top bloke. He took a load of measurements and biomechanical checks, and asked all about my skiing, injuries and so on.

    I tried on a variety of shells first of all to give him the best platform to work with.Onhis advice I didn’t go for the ones I liked the look of but a cheaper boot as he thought it would give the best fit with the minimum mods needed to the shell.

    I went for a daleboot liner with a custom footbed, but because he was out of my size and it would be touch-and-go for a new one to arrive he lent me his own liner, and fully set up the boots. I did it all in one fitting which he really doesn’t recommend, and I’ll be going back soon to get my own liners fitted for this season – so he basically is doing 2 fittings for me for the price of one.

    The boots were fantastic. I went from a Nordica 27.5 to a Salomon 26,0. I’d always clamped boots down too tightly and these are a revalation. I just close them and they just hug my feet. They are very snug (borderline painful) ’till they warm up as you’d expect, but after that they are a perfect fit.

    It genuinely was one of the best customer service experiences I’ve ever had. I travelled for 3 hours to get there, and I’ve got a pair of boots that should last me ages now.

    There are a few Lockwoods recommendations here. I tried them and I thought they were no better than any other basic bootfitter (and I found out afterwards that the good ones who’d built the reputation had all moved on). Anyway, a long post but painful boots can ruin a skiing holiday, wheras good ones can make it exceptional.

    I really would recommend him! This page is worth a read to find out about a “proper” boot fitting.

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    I worked as a bootfitter and had training with Conformable and a guy called Sven Coomer who designed the nordica GP shell and also made *thinks* Zipfit liners. For full disclosure I’m also a qualified ski instructor with 5 seasons exp in NZ and Europe/US.

    Basically you are fitting your foot into the shell, the liner is only there to stop it hurting so the most useful way to size a boot is take the liner out and stand in it with bare feet. Toes touching lightly on the front. Have a look down the back.
    Length: 1cm is a race fit, that will be OK for strong experienced skiiers who want a close fit. about 15mm is what we worked on for ‘recreational skiers’
    Last: All boots have varying lasts – looking at a bare foot and a shell will give you a good idea what could work. You want the shell to closely work with the features of the foot – narrow ankles you need a narrow shell, low volume etc.
    Footbeds: More often than not done incredibly badly. Done badly they will cripple you and also make very very har dto ski properly. Ditto canting. However a good supportive footbed should have a good deep heel cup and if posted then done properly so that your foot is neutral. Stand on one foot – thats what you are basically doing 90% of the time you are on skis.
    Shell flex: Don;t buy a race boot if you can;t ski. Don’t buy a floppy shell if you are a strong skiier. Weight and physical ability have an impact. Too stiff means you’ll be in the backseat all the time and not having much fun. More flex is better than less flex in my experience. You can also use your ankles in a slightly flexier boot without careering off into the trees 😉

    In theory you should be in a boot that is comfotable, even in a race fit. That is, there should be no specific pain, pressure yes, pain no. You shoudl also not be needing to crank your boots up ever. I don;t even do mine up (Nordica GP shell, Zipfit silicone and cork/oil liner) but if i do its 1st/2nd ratchet. If you are cranking your foot down in the boot you are squashing all the blood out of it and aggrivating your nerves. Most people are in a boot 1 week a year – your feet are not used to such treatment.
    Always do a slow run in the AM with your boots quite loose to encourage blood through your feet. Cold feet is normally due to lack of blood. Circulation is everything, even if you hgave to undo your boots on the lifts its a good thing as your feet will like you.

    I’ve got no recommendations for bootfitters except to say I have replaced more boots from big chains than anywhere else – we’re talking people in boots 3-4 times too large.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    They definitely were ‘Master’ boot fitters in Heavenly – one guy was custom tailoring some boots for a woman who had recently recovered from her leg almost being completely amputated above the ankle in a car accident and the guy all my mates went to was fitting some boots to a local who was a US Navy pilot and had lost the front of one foot in a plane crash. The fitter had made a wooden foot extension and carved out a cup in it to accomodate his stump, then split and rejoined the boot with the wooden foot in it, so when the pilot put them on his stump fitted into it solidly enough for him to continue with all his normal off-piste skiing.

    My footbeds are positioned ok now I have forced them forward but Hamish at Profeet wouldn’t accept that there was anything wrong. They were apparently well made otherwise – the boot fitter in Heavenly said he rarely saw work of that quality come out of Europe!

    My boots also had a heel cup/ridge that interfered with my fleshy heels and crippled me on my warm-up trip to Tignes. I put ZipFits in to try to protect me but ended up having the ridge dremelled off in the states.

    That is a surprising comment about Warren as he prefers boots that flex and has done surgury on clients boots if he felt they were too stiff. Not being able to flex would go against all his teachings, and all his instructors get indoctrinated into his ways as well.

    I would really recommend his course – he is to skiing as ‘Jedi’ Tony is to mtbing – certainly there is a similarity between the priase on this forum for Tony and that for Warren and his instructors from people on his courses.

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    I have previously dremeled boots to cut the cuff and make them less stiff/flex more for clients that simply can;t use their ankles in a stiff boot. A softer boot will do more for your skiing than any other enhancement. My GP’s which are race stock boots are softer than normal because I am only light (73kg). I big heffer will bend a stiff boot waaay better than a supermodel waif. Blah blah. Anyway all irrelevent as I don’t ski any more !

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    Dremels are brilliant…

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    Do they still sell the foam liners ? Used to love doing them – quite intense pressure for the boot-ee !

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    Wow some big and obviously knowledgeable posts and I can’t add anything other than to endorse custom liners and at the very least get properly fitted footbeds.

    It took me about 10 days of skiing and tinkering to get my Salomons right and 10 years later I will not part with them.

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    I did a pair of boots for a chap who had had his feet turned round. He was born with his feet back to front so they swapped them over at a very young age. However what that meant was pins, plates and ankles that were the opposite of what they should be plus limited flexibility. He came to see me and another guy one day. What we did was took him next door to the docs surgery and X rayed him standing in a shell so we could work out the max flex vs the shell, then we x-rayed his ankles and measured it all out. Then we had a couple of beers and took to a pair of Langes with the tools and swapped the cuffs over. Then we re-blew the ankle holes and did some other tinkering. Then he came back and stood in the shells and we sorted out the flex by making the cuff more upright and putting a small stop in to stop them overflexing. One set of custom cork footbeds later we foamed him into a pair of liners which we managed to swap from L-R so the ankles were the right way round. The outcome was that he could actually ski really well and was absolutely comfortable as well as being incredibly amazed at what we did. So was i to be honest, we burnt maybe 80 hours working on it in our own time to sort it out (he was in resort for 6 weeks anyway). Nett outcome was he bought us beer every night for the remainder of his hols and apparently still goes to the shop. He also referred a lot of work in. There was some presso done by a surgeon the year after detailing it. Very satisfying.

    scotsman
    Member

    It all depends on how you ski, like someone said if someone says “my boots are so comfy” then the are not fitted properly and as a result not a very good skier, if you are serious about skiing and want improve/become good your boots need to fit like a latex glove to the point where they are uncomfortable but not overly painful. Also depends on your style of skiing, if you stick to the piste and of an intermediate level (can parallel turn but like to keep the speed down) then fit is not so important, go for comfort.
    If your bag is fast edge to edge fall line (old school IMO) on steepish reds then you will still get away more a more comfortable boot with a flex rating around the 100 mark.
    if you want to progress to flat out carving on blacks and back country or hammering through the off piste crud your boot is likely to be uncomfortable because of the fit and shape and the stiff flex rating of 130 IMO its a trade off for becoming a better skier.
    Some saying your toes should just touch the front of your boot, again that all depends on how you ski, if you are just bumbling around on the piste then fine, if you are hammering through the crud, back country, jumping, terrain parks and the like then toes touching the front of the boot is a no no, had several black and lost toe nails because of this, if you are an aggressive skier getting good air a lot of the time along with hard landings toes slamming into the front of the boot is not good, for perfect control when your level of skill increases on your chosen planks the heel should not move at all, forwards or backwards when leaning into the boot.
    Me personally I have my boots done as tight as physically possible (just the way I like it) to the extent that after every run I crack open the buckles for the chairlift back up, as feet are killing me but come lunch time don’t feel the pain any more as I have skied through the pain barrier.
    Bring back Dynafit 3F Comp and Dachstein foam injection boots that’s what I say, just a shame they don’t last for ever or I would still be using mine!

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    Scotsman

    Reading that, you’re either a masochist or it doesn’t sound like you’ve ever had a properly fitted pair of boots. No way should you be having to crack open the buckles every run and going through ‘pain barriers’.

    scotsman
    Member

    Woody, so you saying if you did your boots up as tight as physically possible your feet would not start to hurt?
    Done about 150 days in the last 2 seasons on a pair of Black Diamond Factors, absolutely fantastic boots and fit my requirements perfectly, most comfortable boots since Dynafit 3F comp.
    Every pair in the last 10 years been fitted by an expert, if I have a relatively relaxing day on a mountain and not in the mood for going for it then the boots will be done up normally and they are perfect, for me unless my boots are done up so tight that I can not move any part of my foot then they don’t inspire any confidence when hammering the off piste, think it stems from the days of Glenshee race training when a kid and a teenager spending to many days on the Cairnwell in hard packed and ice through the slalom gates fighting to keep an edge.

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    What I’m saying is that if your boots fitted properly you wouldn’t need to have them done up as tight as physically possible as they should hold your foot in place firmly and with even pressure. From what you said, it sounds like you have yours so tight that they stop the circulation and the only reason they become bearable by lunchtime is that the liner has been heated and very compressed or your feet have become numb. Probably stems from having poorly fitting boots when you were younger which is why you need them over-tightened and associate pain as being necessary for control. I have several mates who ski to a very high standard who thought the same as you…….until they got boots which fitted properly!

    for me unless my boots are done up so tight that I can not move any part of my foot then they don’t inspire any confidence when hammering the off piste

    Hopefully that doesn’t include your toes!

    My boots are very difficult to get on in the morning and the first couple of runs are done on the minimum settings, only then are they tightened maybe one notch which usually does for the rest of the day but occasionally might need one more tweak if I’m being energetic and my feet get hot. I have no problems with heel lift/movement. Maybe I’m not skiing hard enough 😉

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    I fall some where between Scotsman and Woody.

    The first thing I thought after Scotsmans post is that he is unfortunate to have only ever used ill fitting boots. If you clamp your feet up that tight your are actually detracting from your ability to ski well. Then again I agree boots shouldnt be comfortable because then you will never get the control. IMO boots should be snug/slightly firm fitted. You dont need boots to be mega tight to ski quick/controlled.

    I would also question what scotsman is saying about stiff boots! Back in my racing days stiff boots were good because you race on hard packed icy pistes and you want to transfer energy. Even then it wasnt always about power transfer but a stiffer boot giving you more control.

    “if you want to progress to flat out carving on blacks and back country or hammering through the off piste crud your boot is likely to be uncomfortable because of the fit and shape and the stiff flex rating of 130 IMO its a trade off for becoming a better skier.”

    I couldn’t disagree more. In slalom training we quite often used to run gates with the boots completely undone. You then rely on technique and ability rather than brute force…not that I am trying to say anything 🙂 Even today I occasionally fully unclip my boots and ski around for abit just to remind myself that skis are controlled from sensitive pressure movements and steering rather than force.

    Modern skis are incredibly easy to turn, use them to turn for you and they dont require much effort. The same off piste in crud or powder, use the ski and your momentum/body weight transfer to do the turning, brute force just wastes energy and makes you knackerd. Comments like that above about needing mega tight boots off piste and stiff flex show lack of ability and how many people approach off piste skiing that it is hard work and requires extra brute force and power.

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    I fall some where between Scotsman and Woody.

    Without wishing to be contradictory – no you don’t, you agree with me 8)

    I never said they should be ‘comfortable’ just that they should not cause you pain. By the very requirements of ski boots ie. to enable the skis to act as an unnatural extension of your feet, they can never really be classed as comfortable, not if you want performance as well.

    If you want comfort, go boarding 😉

    scotsman
    Member

    Everyone to there own I guess, how we do up our boots is everyone’s own personal preference, the way I do it works for me, mentally it gives me confidence.
    “Probably stems from having poorly fitting boots when you were younger”
    Maybe because when I started skiing (39 now started skiing when I was 8 race training when I was 11) 31 years ago, first pair of own boots at 11 there was nothing compared to what you get nowadays when it comes to boot fitting, not until Dynafit and Dachstein came out with foam injection did things start to progress, then maybe 12-15 years ago we started to see mould-able liners and custom foot beds.
    I ski 30 days on the trot when not working and the “pain” does not bother me in the slightest, maybe pain is a bit much? It’s not as if I am grimacing at the end of every run. Or maybe I am wrong and I know nowt about ski boots. 😉

    scotsman
    Member

    “Comments like that above about needing mega tight boots off piste and stiff flex show lack of ability and how many people approach off piste skiing that it is hard work and requires extra brute force and power”

    I never said anyone needs mega tight fitting boots, I said it works for me.

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    Scotsman

    Seriously M8 – I used to think my Raichle race boots were the ‘holy grail’ – cranked them up like you do and had to loosen them after every run. I suffered with them for 3 years then got a pair which, after a fair bit of messing about with footbeds and heel modification, actually fitted me. Makes time on the slopes so much more enjoyable.

    scotsman
    Member

    OK OK you are correct, when I go up the mountain tomo……………….. fek this I am off to bed first gondola up is at 9.
    I will come back for a boot fitting lesson after a hard day on the hill!

    Dino
    Member

    NzCol has this spot on!
    The rest should ignored as they don’t have a clue 😆

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    fek this I am off to bed first gondola up is at 9.

    :mrgreen:

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    I would say they should be comfortable in ski position as they will be snug, hopefully and exact fit so that you ‘could’ ski in them with your buckles undone.

    When on the chairlift or in the resturant you would probably want to pop the buckles as your foot will shift a little forward out of ski position, so there would be pressure on the top of your foot. That’s how it works in my Technicas anyway.

    Not sure you need super stiff boots nowadays – many coaches teach ankle flex as part of a turn and you also weight the middle of the ski more on a turn than in the old days as you want to pressure both the nose and tail of the ski into the snow to make the turn, whereas older skis only had wide noses so you had to pressure forward and skid the back round more.

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    I’d agree based on some of that tripe.

    Teaching people to ski and ski technically well demands an understanding of the human ski interface which a lot of bootfitters just don’t have, and neither do ‘racers’. A well fitted boot should be close fitting but comfortable. I could stand in mine for 8 hours and run gates without crying in pain.

    Premier Icon crispo
    Subscriber

    Surely how stiff you want the boot depends on the ski aswell?

    The reason many expert skiers have stiffer boots is that the skis (on piste skis) tend to be alot stiffer than intermediate skis. With a stiffer ski more force and power needs to be put through the ski and a stiffer boot helps to do this.

    Completely agree with the comments about skiing with them undone, we used to train like this to improve technique, but youd always want them done up for skiing hard.

    I think most important thing is to consider the type of skiing youre going to be doing most of the time and take it from here.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    another reason for them to become uncomfortable when not in ski position will be that your foot will move forward on your footbed as well, which might also cause them to move upwards in the boot a little as well, and if it is a ‘hard’ custom footbed any ridges will be in wrong place.

    I have seen recommendations that people have ‘soft’ footbeds, with the top made of cork and without all the ridges you get from standing on one of those heat machines.

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