which road commuting front light…

Viewing 38 posts - 1 through 38 (of 38 total)
  • which road commuting front light…
  • available by post this week…

    that adequately and nicely lights up very dark country lanes…

    and is no more than £35 quid.

    tah

    whitestone
    Member

    The moon.

    I’ll sell you a stick! 😉

    Gary_M
    Member

    The only thing you’ll get for that sort of money that will actually light your way is chineese solarstorm or whatever the latest cheap chineese light is. Not great on the road though. Or see thread below 🙂

    I was going to recommend an exposure strada until I saw your budget 🙂

    You’re going to have to triple your budget if you want something to see with, rather than merely be seen with.

    I bought an Exposure Diablo, which was heavily discounted stock as it was 2 iterations older than the latest at the time. Worth every penny.

    …lights it up enough to see where i’m going it doesn’t have to literally turn night to day.

    I used to have a moon jobbie, that did this, now lost it,…the battery was a bit weak though, so i can get that, but thought there might be slightly better options, it was 400 lumens i think.

    tah

    amedias
    Member

    I bought an Exposure Diablo, …. Worth every penny

    Excellent light for MTB, terrible on the road. No directionality and dazzling to anyone coming towards you unless literally pointing at the ground, and then it doesn’t light where you’re going well enough.

    Look for proper road lights with a directional beam and a vertical cutoff to avoid dazzling other road users. With proper optics you can get better/more useful illumination for far fewer quoted lumens and consequently better battery life and often lower cost.

    I’d suggest one of the Chinese magicshine jobbers off DX then. You’ll have to wait for them to ship.

    IME ‘to see with’ means you’ll need 800 to 1000 lumen or so. I have a 200 lumen fenix as a backup, which ain’t great for picking potholes/cowmuck out at speed on country lanes.

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
    Subscriber

    You’re going to have to triple your budget if you want something to see with

    Bollocks. 300-500 lumens is more than enough for this kind of use. Used to mtb with far less. It’s just over £35 but the Light and Motion Urban 350 is nice.

    Excellent light for MTB, terrible on the road. No directionality and dazzling to anyone coming towards you unless literally pointing at the ground, and then it doesn’t light where you’re going well enough.

    Wut? I find it rather excellent. This is after years of old halogen MTBing lights, and several cheap chinese LED jobbers.

    Reach and throw is great at road bike speeds, the peripheral illumination I find essential. In town it wears a home-made light ring.

    … as for tripling the budget, well maybe things have moved on !

    Gary_M
    Member

    Look for proper road lights with a directional beam and a vertical cutoff to avoid dazzling other road users

    For £35? Don’t think that fluxient will have a vertical cut off?

    https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/LIMSMJ900/magicshine-mj900-1200-lumen-led-bicycle-light

    If you’re in the market for some other cycling spares, you could easily get £100 of bargains at the mo (check specific sections AND the Fib Sale) to get free P&P (but then it might not arrive by the end of Saturday).

    For £35? Don’t think that fluxient will have a vertical cut off?

    It does. StVzo compliant it says.

    Wut? I find it rather excellent. This is after years of old halogen MTBing lights, and several cheap chinese LED jobbers.

    I think the issue is more that other people being dazzled might not find it so excellent.

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    If you’re happy to risk it not quite turning up this week then you can get the older model of the B&M Ixon IQ on that budget.

    It’s hard to go back to scattergun beams once you’ve had a proper road beam, IMO: the hotspot is always in the wrong place and you’re always dazzling drivers.

    If you do want a scattergun beam then this is a fair amount of light for the cash (I’ve got one I picked up cheap last year for off-road use, but haven’t used it in anger yet).

    stumpy01
    Member

    Gary_M – Member

    For £35? Don’t think that fluxient will have a vertical cut off?

    Have you clicked on the link??
    It’s in a similar vein to the B&M Ixon lights that fire the LED onto a reflector.
    It does appear to have a sharp cut-off & is claimed to be StVZO compliant.

    I am quite tempted to try one of these on the road bike.

    CraigW
    Member

    Busch & Muller Ixon Core is pretty good, about £35. Proper German beam shape, bright enough for most unlit roads. Though I would like something a bit brighter for fast, twisty descents.
    Battery life is not bad, it has USB charging.

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    I think the issue is more that other people being dazzled might not find it so excellent.

    Yup, and IME they often react by coming at you with main beam on, which leaves you blinded while you’re trying to pass each other on a narrow country lane and for several seconds afterwards. It’s one of the main reasons I went over to German-standard beams.

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    Hmm, I missed the Fluxient link. Looks interesting… Much depends on how good the reflector is: keeping the light below the horizon is one thing but you still want more light sent into the distance to avoid a nearfield hotspot. The test image doesn’t fill me with confidence, though it’s still better than a scattergun.

    *heads off to google*

    amedias
    Member

    Wut? I find it rather excellent. This is after years of old halogen MTBing lights, and several cheap chinese LED jobbers.

    I think the issue is more that other people being dazzled might not find it so excellent.

    [/quote]

    exactly

    I’m not dissing the Diablo (I own one), but it’s not a good road light. As I mentioned in my original post it dazzles and has no directionality to the beam (eg: StVzo compliant beams).

    This is partly why this kind of stuff persists:

    IME ‘to see with’ means you’ll need 800 to 1000 lumen or so.

    The reason you need lots of lumens is because of MTB style lights, which need massive output as it goes everywhere. 1000 lumens is all well and good, but 700 of them are pointing at stuff you don’t need to see, lighting up trees above your head etc. A decent directed beam can be more useful with lower output.

    I do 90% of my night road riding (commute, training and changangs etc) with a Son Edelux or Sueprnova E3, their output is a few hundred lumen at best yet for road use they are better than my Diablo in almost every way, better beam for me, and other road users.

    I do sometimes use the Diablo or my Maxx-D if I’m out on a non-dyno bike but it’s always annoying as I have to keep moving all the time and the bright bit is never where I want it!

    Gary_M
    Member

    Have you clicked on the link??

    Yes to both your questions. A 700lumen light, road specific beam and a horizontal cut off, 2.5hrs run time on high, all for £35, somethings got to give.

    Regarding how many lumens you need, generally I use my 1200lumen strada on low on pitch black roads, sometimes switch to medium if I see something up ahead that looks to be on the road.

    The Raveman lights look interesting too. Cut off beam and normal beam, plus they work as a battery pack to charge USB stuff like your phone:
    https://www.merlincycles.com/ravemen-pr600-rechargeable-front-light-101137.html

    (they do various power outputs / prices)

    amedias
    Member

    Yes to both your questions. A 700lumen light, road specific beam and a horizontal cut off, 2.5hrs run time on high, all for £35, somethings got to give.

    I don’t see why, 700lm and 2.5hr for £35 is hardly unusual, Chinese lights (and Torchy and other UK distributors of similar) have been putting out stuff like that and better for a few years, the only new bit StVzo compliant optics, and there’s no real reason why they would add more than a few £ to manufacturing costs.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Chinese lights (and Torchy and other UK distributors of similar) have been putting out stuff like that and better for a few years

    I’ve had chineese lights, the batteries don’t last and/or the lights fail after a seasons use. For £35 that’s fine, but that’s what makes them cheap.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    I’ve just bought a Blackburn Central 650 for £50.

    650 Lumens, rechargeable and replaceable battery. It was the latter that swung it for me.

    If you’re worried about stray light, it’s easy enough to knock up a visor for a light using some flexible plastic from the likes of a milk bottle and either Sugru it on or ziptie.

    amedias
    Member

    and Torchy and other UK distributors of similar

    eg: MTB batteries, C and B seen etc. Light ehad units from the far east but with UK backup and decent batteries.

    I’ve had a few lights of Torchy, all excellent, all with decent batteries, which do last.

    The Fluxient U2 mini is especially excellent as an MTB helmet light. I bought one as a stop gap when my Diablo needed a new battery. 1100 lumen (quoted, no reason to doubt as seems equal to my Diablo) paid £35 including 2x 3400mAh panasonic cells.

    It’s not only as good in terms of light, but the battery lasts longer and can be swapped easily with no tools on the trail if needs be. Literally the only downside is that it weighs about 50g more.

    If you’re worried about stray light, it’s easy enough to knock up a visor for a light using some flexible plastic from the likes of a milk bottle and either Sugru it on or ziptie.

    IME that can help for other riders already close to you, but is in no way comparable to a proper beam. In order to actually prevent dazzling oncoming traffic/people more than a few meters away the key bit is that the emitter not be directly visible, which with a shroud or visor means ‘waaaaay bigger than you think’. It’s why all the StVzo stuff is reverse-reflected.

    I feel like I’m on the warpath about this but Omni-directional MTB style lights really are sub-optimal for road use for both the user and other people. There’s really no reason why you should’t use StVzo compliant lights, it’s not like they’re any more expensive or have any other downsides.

    Not to mention that technically* lights that dazzle are as illegal as no lights at all and in some cases more of a danger.

    The resistance seems to come from people that have bough posh lights like Exposure (not a dig, I own several!), and then getting the hump when you point out they’ve bought an MTB offroad light and it’s not ideal for road use. Don’t get the hump, they’re not bad lights, they’re just a different tool for a different job.

    Exposure have started doing more directed/road specific lights in recent years, but I don’t think (I’ll check) they actually do a compliant model?

    * the best kind of correct after all

    drlex
    Member

    How about a cheaper version of the Philips SafeRide? Compliant beam, USB-rechargeable, and can run from 4xAA cells.

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    If you’re worried about stray light, it’s easy enough to knock up a visor for a light using some flexible plastic from the likes of a milk bottle and either Sugru it on or ziptie.

    I’ve tried it, it really didn’t work well for me. With the light angled to give tolerable throw you’d probably need about six feet of hood before it was effective, and with the light angled to enable a practicably-sized hood to be useful you end up with the hotspot about three feet in front of you. (Measurements may not be accurate, YMMV, etc.)

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    Reminds me, I must get round to building my switched main beam for my dyno lights 🙂

    ElShalimo
    Member

    I’ve been looking at the 960 lumens Chilli Tech lights
    Are they any good ?

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    Another shout for the B&M ixon premium. It has enough power, lasts for ages and takes AA batteries. Ideal for overnight rides.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    Bez – Member
    ‘If you’re worried about stray light, it’s easy enough to knock up a visor for a light using some flexible plastic from the likes of a milk bottle and either Sugru it on or ziptie.’
    I’ve tried it, it really didn’t work well for me. With the light angled to give tolerable throw you’d probably need about six feet of hood before it was effective…

    Thanks for the correction.

    I last did this about 15 years ago and didn’t account for lights getting much more powerful since then – and it probably was a 1 watt light . 🙂

    stevew
    Member

    Had a Xeccon Strive for a few years now, excellent.

    Can be ran in flood/spot or combo of both, rated at 900 lumens and not sure if it really puts that much out but used it on many a very early morning / evening winter training ride on small unlit lanes and works a treat.

    null

    plus one
    Member

    Picked up a fluxient off torchy will test on 3hr road ride tonight 😀

    I’ll run on flash/low beam to conserve battery until in the sticks

    I’ll report back

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F292295377367

    Proper back-road single lanes commute here, rarely see a car. I use a Cateye Volt 1200 which creates a bit of a conundrum – if I use it on full power, oncoming headlights are difficult to make out through the trees, over brows of hills etc, so cars tend to surprise me. If I turn it onto a lower setting, I get earlier warning but they don’t see me so I get blinded by a car coming around a bend taking up most of the road. I usually slow right down or stop, bit of a pain but doesn’t happen often.

    Brite-r works for me. 20-30 quid. Lasted over a year without breaking and gives out good light.

    plus one
    Member

    No drama on evening road ride 8)

    Ran it on flash mode around an hour then low beam for another hour and high beam last 40mins ..

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    If you’re worried about stray light, it’s easy enough to knock up a visor for a light using some flexible plastic from the likes of a milk bottle and either Sugru it on or ziptie.’

    I’ve tried it, it really didn’t work well for me. With the light angled to give tolerable throw you’d probably need about six feet of hood before it was effective..

    .

    Yup, second what bez said. First attempt below. I very quickly put a square of black tape over the top, because it diffused a lot of the lumens into my eyes. Distracting and spoilt my night vision.

    Then I tried pulling the shroud further out forward and bending it down, because it was doing next to nothing in terms of cutting the beam off. Then realised, as per bez above, that you’d have to have a much longer shroud for it to work. The reflector round the led is bouncing light forward and out from the all the way round the led, including from the bottom, so if the shrouds coming from the top, it’ll have to come impractically far forward before it does any shrouding. If you project the angle from the bottom of the glass to the edge of the shroud in this pic, there’s loads of light still going high.

    Worth it to make you more visible from the side, though, but that’s all!

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