Which drill for light-duty DIY use

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  • Which drill for light-duty DIY use
  • As a general rule, I’ve found anything with a Li-Ion battery better than anything with a NiCad battery.
    Screwfix have usually got something on offer for around £100.

    andyl
    Member

    Bosch PSB 14V or 18V li-ion drills are perfect for home use. I picked up the 14V version for £50 a couple of years back in a B&Q sale. I think they are the li-2 models and are green.

    This is the 18V one with 2 batteries.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    +1 for the Bosch 18v Li-ion ‘Power 4 all’ thing. I paid £90 ish for drill + two batteries in B&Q and have used it loads, really impressed by it.

    Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    I have a Makita one that was £99 from B and Q, came with two batteries and a bit set. It’s done way more than I ever thought it would and is still going really well.

    trail_rat
    Member

    +1 for the one footflaps put up.

    how ever the hitachi that screwfix are knocking out looks good

    dont be tempted by the blue bosch screwfix are knocking out for a ton – its terrible. its not their best design and strips out gearbox teeth — thats why i have the one footflats put up…. that was my exchange.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    You can get a pro quality one for £100 from screwfix, well worth the extra few quid for quality IMO, although I’m sure a DIY one would do the job

    eg
    http://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-bhp453sh-18v-1-3ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill/58614
    http://www.screwfix.com/p/hitachi-dv18dcl2-18v-1-5ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill/64945

    Premier Icon Speshpaul
    Subscriber

    This from Graham +1
    As a general rule, I’ve found anything with a Li-Ion battery better than anything with a NiCad battery
    or spend no more than £30 and throw it away when the Ni cads packup.

    I’ve got on of the boschs mentioned above and they are rather good, B&Q have normally got an offer going especailly around bank holidays, also drag a pensioner in on a wednesday for another 10% off.

    DrJ
    Member

    My old B&D stopped working – battery seems knackered – and as a new battery costs 25 quid I am thinking I will just get a new drill. Just need it for stiff like putting up pictures, assembling IKEA units etc, though the possibility of being able to drill into harder materials would be good.

    I was looking at this one which seems to fill the bill, but maybe you know better. I realise that B&D stuff has the same credibility as a Halfords bike, but is this a bad buy?

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Have a good think about how often you’ll actually use it. Often its extended non-use rather than use that shags drill batteries. Some of the new breed of Li-ion batteries, although they are generally able to withstand casual and clumsy and incomplete charging, can be banjaxed by months of non-use. Certainly the 18v Li-ion Makitas, although ace in lots of ways, and can be a bargain – not using them for 4 or 5 months can ruin the battery, and Li-ion batteries are more like £80 – £100 to replace than £25. So buying cheaper and buying twice might be the better option if your usage is low.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Some of the new breed of Li-ion batteries, although they are generally able to withstand casual and clumsy and incomplete charging, can be banjaxed by months of non-use.

    That’s one of the benefits of NiMH and Li-ion over Ni-Cds, there is no issue with incomplete charging, no matter how expensive or cheap your battery.

    trail_rat
    Member

    if your use is that infrequent just get a plug in the wall one and an extension …. itll probably last the rest of your life….

    konabunny
    Member

    Why the big deal about cordless?

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    Why the big deal about cordless?

    Big deal for or against? I’m very much for it. Cable drills really need to be stored in a case to prevent damage to the cable and they generally come with a blow molded case that it takes 10 mins to get the thing back into and you still end up with a bit of cable sticking out. Cordless can just sit on the shelf. When you need it, just grab it, use it, put it back. Great for making little jobs that little bit easier.

    trail_rat
    Member

    “Cable drills really need to be stored in a case to prevent damage to the cable and they generally come with a blow molded case that it takes 10 mins “

    they really dont…… up till recently mines was mounted in a press jig with the cable neatly coiled up round it.

    and only takes 10 minutes to get back into the case if you have sausage fingers and its never out of charge….

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Why the big deal about cordless?

    Convenience, no extension leads getting caught up when moving about between rafters etc. Want to nip over the fence to screw some lose gravel boards back in place, just grab the drill and go etc.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    My corded drill’s never been kept in a case, it’s about 20 years old and still going strong. I guess it’s more likely to be an issue with a poor quality tool with no stress relief on the cable?

    Re cordless- it is miles better, but as above, lithium is better than nicad in most ways but it’s still sensitive to storage so if you don’t use it often, there’s a reasonable chance it’ll suffer.

    tops 5
    Member

    I got a B&Q own brand one for £12.00 been ok so far. Will throw it away and buy another if it breaks

    DrJ
    Member

    Thanks for all the ideas. I decided to buy the Bosch 18v one. i DO like cordless – less faffing around, so I hope this one turns out OK!

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Why the big deal about cordless?

    The real advantage of cordless around the house for diy work (given you’re never more than an extension lead away from civilisation) is the battery inadvertantly balances the drill for one handed use. A corded drill is fatiguing to use one handed for driving screws etc because its front heavy. If you’ve got a well developed forearm (or want a well developed forearm) then a corded drill is perfectly serviceable for anything you’d do with a battery drill, and better at some things. Its just a bit tiring when you’re getting through a 1000 screws an hour

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