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Viewing 40 posts - 39,121 through 39,160 (of 39,359 total)
  • The Coronavirus Discussion Thread.
  • trail_rat
    Free Member

    Conversely We went to ARI for a scan a couple of weeks

    Every person I saw was masked up from the front door to the back.

    somafunk
    Full Member

     Tired : Are they not required to wear a mask when treating the immunocompromised? I’d expect that as a matter of precaution because the masks are really to prevent infection of others rather than protect the wearer from infection. If both patient and healthcare worker are wearing masks, there will be more protection from inadvertent transmission.

    My thoughts as well, those 3 in the room will come into close physical contact with more disparate individuals in one day than I have in the past few months and as such I had made it very clear I do not wish to suffer the consequences of getting covid, however slight it may or may not be as even a very slight bladder infection/raised temperature from using catheters lays me up for weeks and they are getting harder to recover from.

    I see my mother each day, and she keeps to herself and 3 others out on walks/hikes and I see a mate once a week who tests herself before visiting – living in a very rural/quiet area of Galloway has its upsides.

    Found this on Twitter

    Drac
    Full Member

    i (the boy) had an appointment in Sheffield Childrens Hospital a couple of weeks ago, no masks on any staff, no masks on any visitors, both in clinical outpatients and x-ray, and there seemed to be some poorly kids being wheeled about, as x-ray is the other side of the hospital from the outpatient department we were in, didn’t see a single mask

    Excellent. You did see that I didn’t say all, right?

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Just had my flu and Covid vaccinations. Cominarty Bivalent apparently.

    Initial reaction was a weird taste (I’ve noticed this before) and my jaw seems a bit stiff. Not sure I’ll be doing my planned 10k run later.

    ernielynch
    Free Member

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2022/11/27/world/science-health-world/next-coronavirus-strain-dangerous/

    That’s grim news 🙁

    Edit: Especially if combined with the inevitable pandemic fatigue. Plus all those like myself who got a super mild form of omicron and might feel invincible.

    onehundredthidiot
    Full Member

    Every person I saw was masked up from the front door to the back.


    @trail_rat
    for some reason this paints a picture of surgical gowns and too many masks for one individual.

    MrSmith
    Free Member

    The study is yet to be peer reviewed and is based solely on laboratory work on samples from one individual.

    ^ from the Japan times article. it’s just scaremongering, BA/BQ/XBB variants are far more easy to catch yet in an environment where 95% of the population has had covid at least once and a high percentage of the population have had a full course of vaccination plus 2 boosters (1 of them bivalent) it hasn’t caused a ‘disaster fappers’ wet dream, cases have risen rapidly and seen an equally rapid fall without a significant increase in ICU admissions and death. This has happened in most European countries, it’s places like china where old people would rather trust ground up roots/herbs than vaccines that will see problems. The U.S seniors have not embraced boosters in the way europe has so they might see a significant increase in deaths this winter.
    here in the U.K flu has overtaken covid for hospital admissions.

    ernielynch
    Free Member

    here in the U.K flu has overtaken covid for hospital admissions.

    Isn’t the UK covid peak expected in January?

    https://news.sky.com/story/modelling-predicts-low-covid-christmas-but-another-peak-in-january-12734929

    MrSmith
    Free Member

    week 1-2 January are always peaks for respiratory winter infections due to travel/mixing/sitting in crowded rooms drinking and eating sugar laden carbs.

    who knows when the next variant driven peak is but covid peaks have come at various times not when they are expected to.

    null

    lamp
    Free Member

    @ernielynch – i wouldn’t get too worked up about that article. They keyword is ‘maybe’. Remember these online news outlets need clicks and constant traffic so a massaging of facts for a story has become the norm unfortunately.

    ernielynch
    Free Member

    Yeah I fully accept that at this stage it is merely speculation, the article makes that quite clear.

    It still doesn’t sound like particularly great news the suggestion of the likelihood of the next covid variant being more virulent than omicron. I also appreciate that it is based on not particularly extensive work, but it does I believe come from the lab that originally identified omicron, so presumably a fairly reputable source?

    I am not personally worried as I am fully jabbed and whilst omicron affected every member of my immediate family all, without exception, had symptoms no worse than a cold, so there is quite possibility a genetic resistance to Covid.

    I do however feel it is a worry if covid mutates into a more serious variant, especially as I say people are far less likely to it as seriously as they did a couple of years ago.

    The assumption now is that large scale vaccination combined with natural immunity further covid waves will put less stress on the NHS and cause less deaths, it would be a shame if covid didn’t strictly follow the script!

    kelvin
    Full Member

    It was some interesting info… thanks for the link Ernie.

    MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    Took my mum to the Nightingale unit in Derby today for some results.

    We were the only people with masks – staff or patients.

    Genuinely made me feel like I was the weird one.

    daveylad
    Free Member

    You were the weird one. It’s over and has been for a long time.

    MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    You were the weird one.

    Been said before

    It’s over and has been for a long time.

    Doesn’t feel that way for some who are still catching it

    dantsw13
    Free Member

    Don’t confuse the fact the media have moved on, with it being over.

    Sandwich
    Full Member

    You were the weird one. It’s over and has been for a long time.

    Complacency is not your friend given the way viral infections evolve over time. There’s background infection ongoing which may cause the virus to evolve to a form that can spread and infect the vaccinated 433 died of it in the last week (source) and just under 19400 tested positive. That’s a sizeable reservoir of viral talent. Ongoing caution may still be appropriate.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    You were the weird one.

    I am the cautious one, being married to a severely immunosuppressed wife.

    Keep that argument up and you’ll never wear a seatbelt, helmet, pads or wash your hands.

    It’s over and has been for a long time.

    While the press have moved on, and the overall numbers are down, like all all forms of flu, it’s kicking around. Currently in my son’s halls of residence, seems half of them have come down with it, my son included.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    I also had hospital appointment yesterday, and they were being very fussy about washing hands and mask wearing.
    Posed an issue when they gave me a cuppa and biscuit after the treatment…

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Everyone was masked up at the vaccination clinic on Monday.

    Oh – other than the sore arm, I seem to have escaped any side-effects. Having said that, I ran a seasons-best 10km on Monday night so I’m considering going back for more.

    slowoldman
    Full Member

    Well certainly at Stepping Hill Hospital eye clinic and my local vaccination centre in Stockport masks are still required.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    A bit of research pertinent to family_oab with an immunocompromised person in the household. The evidence for a vulnerable group is clear – a combination of shielding and vaccination has saved a huge number of lives.

    By April 2022, only 23% of individuals with immunodeficiency had suffered one or more SARS-CoV-2 infections, compared to over 71% of the general population. This large discrepancy is likely due to the community continuing to shield from infection.

    The peak of hospitalisations and deaths in the general population occurred in January 2021 during the alpha wave of the pandemic. In contrast, the majority of infection amongst individuals with immunodeficiency occurred over a year later during the Omicron wave. This delay meant that individuals with immunodeficiency received more vaccine doses by the time they were infected

    SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations have significantly reduced hospitalisation and mortality from COVID-19 amongst patients with immunodeficiency. For example, in individuals with primary immunodeficiency, mortality has fallen from 1 in 5 at the start of the pandemic, prior to vaccination to around 1 in 33 following the deployment of vaccinations.

    However, SARS-CoV-2 continues to pose immediate and significant risks to the immunodeficiency community. The Omicron variant, which has been dominant in the UK since mid-December 2021, has been mooted to cause less serious disease than previous variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Yet amongst those with primary and secondary immunodeficiency, 10% of individuals infected with Omicron required hospitalisation and 2.7% of individual died compared to 2.2% of the general population requiring hospitalisation and 0.2% succumbing to COVID-19.

    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2022.984376/full

    longdog
    Free Member

    Anti-vax in-laws have it again, and are apparently fairly bad with it, but not hospital bad. Not sure if it’s their 3rd or 4th time. Apparently there’re around 200 kids off with it at their sons school! Peterborough.

    Protection by having it doesn’t seem to be working for them, meanwhile (touch wood), our fully boosted family haven’t knowingly had it yet, and that’s with my wife testing atleast weekly for work.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    The little hospital where I used to work all staff are still wearing masks.  I cannot believe there are healthcare settings where they are not.

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    I see Twitter has relaxed its rules on accounts spreading Covid misinformation. Ffs. Yay for that.

    Onzadog
    Free Member

    I’ve got it again. Last time was two years ago.

    Not seen anyone in an extended indoor setting other than work for the last week or so and there are people there who have openly been claiming to have seasonal sniffles. Seems lots of work places have learned nothing in that time.

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    I had my 4th vaccinaton last week – along with the flu vaccine. Didn’t really seem to get any symptoms but I now have an itchy patch at the injection site and it’s slightly raised. Anyone else experienced this? Looks like it happens in around 4% of cases.

    reluctantjumper
    Full Member

    My sister has it for the 3rd time now, the joys of having kids tht are 3 and 9. Both if their schools are reporting a decent amount of cases so it definitely isn’t ‘over’ yet.

    Amazingly I’ve still not had it, am expecting the get it this winter though as no booster for me.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    <Slow handclap>

    somafunk
    Full Member

    She really is as thick as she looks.

    kelvin
    Full Member

    I thought we already learnt the hard way that this virus loves Xmas?

    myti
    Free Member

    I can’t believe it still was compulsory frankly. Smiles are good.

    fossy
    Full Member

    MIL’s old care home is rampant with Covid at the moment and folk have died. MIL passed 6 months ago though (respiratory issues some weeks after Covid).

    Del
    Full Member

    Of course. Living to see next Christmas is often appreciated though.

    ernielynch
    Free Member

    From the above link:

    Guidance on the use of face masks in all care settings and on outbreaks in care homes has been updated to give settings the flexibility to ensure ongoing COVID-19 measures are proportionate.

    Previous guidance stated that face masks in care settings should be worn at all times and that care homes should seek advice from a local health protection team in the event of COVID-19 outbreak, but this pre-Christmas change enables providers to further utilise their own skills and knowledge on appropriate measures.

    From Thursday 15 December, providers can make risk-based decisions on when face masks are used, and care homes can initiate their own outbreak risk assessments to make decisions about which outbreak measures make sense for their individual settings. Decisions around masks will be based on factors like the risk to specific individuals, if the setting is in an outbreak or the preferences of the individual receiving care. Support remains available from health protection teams and other local partners for care homes when needed.

    It all sounds perfectly reasonable to me but I am not an epidemiologist, so if it isn’t perhaps someone who is an expert can explain the problem of allowing care homes to do their own risk assessment?

    What is wrong with a care home where all the residents have been fully vaccinated and boosted allowing visitors without symptoms not to wear face coverings.

    Or a care home resident who 2 weeks previously fully recovered from Covid hugging their unmasked daughter?

    I don’t understand why one rule fits all situations is the correct approach when it is clear that an endless variety of situations is likely to exist.

    TiRed earlier on this thread suggested that typically we might come in contact with a specific coronavirus perhaps once every two years, which is why topping up your immunity with constant low-level exposure is unlikely, do we really need to apply universal and immovable strict rules without realistic risk assessments?

    Elderly and frail people have always been prone to infections from staff and visitors, why weren’t face coverings a statutory obligation before covid?

    Flaperon
    Full Member

    Avoid the quick tests sold in Morrisons (and some pharmacies), made by Getein Biotech. They might not actually be fake – although I wouldn’t be surprised if they were – but are such poor quality they might as well be.

    The paper strip doesn’t absorb the buffer solution. Tried 6 of them, with different people, from different sources. Even dismantling the test cartridge and dipping the strip directly into the solution fails to register any kind of result.

    Stick to the Flowflex ones sold in Boots, they’re leagues ahead in terms of quality and reliability.

    onewheelgood
    Full Member

    My mother died of COVID in a care home 10 days ago. It’s not over. In the last year I think her care home had made entirely sensible choices about their mask policies based on the situation, and we had been able to visit her unmasked for most of the year.

    (No need for condolences, her dementia had got to the point where her passing was a blessing. In the last two or three months the last embers of who she was had gone out. It was time.)

    kelvin
    Full Member

    What is wrong with a care home where all the residents have been fully vaccinated and boosted allowing visitors without symptoms not to wear face coverings.

    This is primarily about whether care staff moving between many different residents (or caring for many different people in their own homes) should wear masks while working. Visitors have been able to be with residents mask free, with other mitigations, for a while now.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    Human tragedy on a vast scale unfolding in China. It’s a reminder of how dangerous a virus it remains in a sub-optimally vaccinated and vulnerable population.

    We will undoubtedly feel the effects of this, economically given the likely chaos in China, and perhaps in terms of new variants emerging from hundreds of millions of new hosts.

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