What's with people racing 'challenge' events? Or just me that isn't? Discuss

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  • What's with people racing 'challenge' events? Or just me that isn't? Discuss
  • Premier Icon andytherocketeer
    Subscriber

    Don’t have a major issue if it is more like an Audax reliability trial (ie “here’s a set of checkpoints, navigate round them, no marshalls, no route markings, can’t average faster than XXXX mph”). Do have an issue if it uses the word “race” anywhere in the promotion, or there is a “winner”, or best time is a key part of taking part.

    So what’s the deal if I just happen to be going for a walk/hike on one of these footpaths/bridlepaths? Will every rider slow down? ring a bell? expect me to step out of the way in good time so that they don’t lose time or flow? Will a marshall stop me and prevent me from walking the footpath/bridlepath? or warn me that there is a “race”, so pay attention to faster than normal cyclists? or just advise me that there are more cyclists than normal, so be aware?

    mrmo
    Member

    The BW? I think you’ll find they have to have rather greater cause than that somebody raced down it one day to do that (even assuming they can prove that actually happened).

    quite word with the council and it is amazing what you can achieve….

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    It seems to me that if you think you’re some kind of hero for overtaking hordes of fun riders with little fitness and/or off-road experience, but think XC racing is too serious or poncy, then you might want to think about that fragile ego of yours and have a proper look at racing because for most it’s done for exactly the same reasons of fun and personal challenge.

    There are a whole load of riders out there who do have fitness and plenty of off-road experience (I’ll include myself in that lot) but are intimidated or put-off by racing. However they’d still like to take part in an event and once on the start line can’t help but compete. I’d suggest that these “challenge” events are the direct equivalent of the grass-roots racing that was the old breeding ground of racers and that many of the riders go on to race “properly”.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    quite word with the council and it is amazing what you can achieve….

    Oh yes? How many BWs have been extinguished that you know of? Are you even aware of the procedure required to do so?

    oldgit
    Member

    Spoke to another forum member about this today, and it does look like there are grey areas.
    As someone that races road, cyclo cross and a bit of XC I see events as just that, events.
    But as I said as we talked we came across grey areas. I see 24’s as races, but there will be hundreds of folk just having fun. Then there’s the CLIC I did some years back, and they were very clear that that 24 wasn’t a race as it used some BWs.
    So on a personal note, a challenge ride would be a social. I’d ride quick sticks, but I’d chat at food stops or ride alongside someone for a chat.
    In my head what is a race and what isn’t is very clear.
    I suppose you would need to know what the ‘event’ was classed as when the organizers sought all the permissions and insurances? I wonder if the organizers of the event called it a race then.

    stilltortoise, it doesn’t sound like you’re in it for the ego trip, so that wasn’t really aimed at people like you, but I wonder why you feel intimidated by racing, it’s not really any less accessible. IMO you swap the crowds for more excitement. It also led me to at least trying road, cyclocross, and track racing with virtually no experience, just a willingness to give it a go.

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    so that wasn’t really aimed at people like you

    Fair enough, I didn’t think so, but it only reinforces the point I was making which is that there’s a market for an event that isn’t a full on race but isn’t a non-competitive pootle. Maybe such events don’t officially exist, but the very fact Chipps has started this thread and the very responses it has generated show that is how they are approached by many. Does it really matter and if so what can be done about it?

    As for the intimidation factor of races, I’m not sure why I have this, but it’s what put me off joining a (road) cycling club for years, since it always appeared to be about time trial this and race that. I finally joined a club last year and have loved getting out on the club rides with them, but I’m still nervous about competing in a race I know I have no chance of being competitive in. That’s not to say I don’t enjoy giving it some beans on the club rides now and again 🙂

    Premier Icon flap_jack
    Subscriber

    Whenever someone says

    “It’s not a race”

    one of my mates says

    “what sort of race isn’t it ?”

    Stilltortoise, the best advice I can give to anyone in your market is to find a local race series and give it a go. You might just surprise yourself, I think I came third in my first Beginner race and that was riding from the back because I didn’t think I’d be competitive so I didn’t want to get in anyone’s way at the start. You might be intimidated for 5 minutes at your first ever race, but frankly if you’ve done big events, the organisation and scale is usually distinctly grass roots, and flash bikes and kit does not necessarily indicate a rider is fast or fit.

    Depending on your fitness there are fun/beginner, open, and sport categories designed to give you access. You won’t be racing against the elites, experts, or even the masters, just the weekend warriors and maybe some Juniors. Most people aren’t going to be competitive for the win, top 5, or even the top 10, but they still enjoy racing against those at their approximate level, the course, and the event atmosphere.

    gears_suck
    Member

    If there’s more than one person on the trail. It’s a race.

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    Londonerinoz, I confess the intimidation factor was really in relation to road races. Having “competed” against all sorts of MTB fast boys (including Nick Craig!) at the Singletrack Weekender, I know a race doesn’t have to be intimidating.

    mrmo
    Member

    Oh yes? How many BWs have been extinguished that you know of? Are you even aware of the procedure required to do so?

    extinguished, agreed, but rerouted plenty. Some for very stupid reasons and the creation of routes that are crap.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byelaws_in_the_United_Kingdom

    Plenty of scope for criminal prosecution if the landowner sees fit.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Yes, I’m aware of the existence of byelaws – I was asking for the details of the one which meant you were trespassing if racing on a BW.

    Evidence of racing on a BW still isn’t a valid reason for rerouting it, whatever anecdotes you might have.

    big_n_daft
    Member

    Yes, I’m aware of the existence of byelaws – I was asking for the details of the one which meant you were trespassing if racing on a BW

    the trespass is probably by the organiser of the race rather than the individuals. The individuals are commiting a highways offence which is a criminal act

    the issues with racing on bridleways are set out quite sensibly here http://imba.org.uk/public-rights-of-way/cycle-racing-on-bridleways/

    based on the responses on here you couldn’t get rider compliance with the restrictions (giving way etc) and therefore I wouldn’t organise an event based on bridleways even if it was legal

    big_n_daft
    Member

    Fair enough, I didn’t think so, but it only reinforces the point I was making which is that there’s a market for an event that isn’t a full on race but isn’t a non-competitive pootle. Maybe such events don’t officially exist, but the very fact Chipps has started this thread and the very responses it has generated show that is how they are approached by many. Does it really matter and if so what can be done about it?

    there are plenty of events that go out of their way to encourage people to “have-a-go”, it’s just percieved as an easier option to enter a “challenge” event

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    the trespass is probably by the organiser of the race rather than the individuals. The individuals are commiting a highways offence which is a criminal act

    I don’t think an organisor can commit trespass by proxy. In any case I was referring to the previous statement “When the landowner in the case of the NT invokes the bylaws, racing on a bridleway means you will be tresspassing, and takes you to court for tresspass” which clearly refers to the people actually racing.

    I’m aware of the legislation and it is still an anachronism. Would you refuse to organise an event which uses BWs as well as the FPs and multi-use forest tracks currently used by such events (with BWs carefully avoided) where competitors do respect other trail users and manage without conflict? I’ve competed in a few of those, and it is very strange the way BWs have to be treated differently. I think you’re confusing non-acceptance of the current law with lack of courtesy for other users.

    Oh, and I’ve also taken part in events which were strictly speaking illegal under the current law (and an awful lot of events which skirt around the edges on the basis that given free route choice and that everybody goes different ways it’s not racing even though it’s a timed competition where prizes are awarded). I’ve never heard of a conflict between different trail users in any of those events, whatever the stupid law might say.

Viewing 16 posts - 136 through 151 (of 151 total)

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