What Will The NHS Be In 5 Years?

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  • What Will The NHS Be In 5 Years?
  • Basil
    Member

    Recently had experience of admission and treatment , it has changed since my last trauma.
    Wonder what will change by 2020?

    What will the nhs be in 5 years time? It will be Non existent.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    More effective at treating people in the right place at the right time, I hope.

    Not fussed how they achieve it.

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    More expensive

    Chipping Norton and Skelmersdale

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    There will still be an NHS come 2020, quite how it will operate is anyone’s guess, right now, I would expect local healthcare trusts to be little more than overgrown procurement departments, and flogging various healthcare servicesto them will of course be a fantastic cash cow for those tying themselves in to long contracts.

    The whole “austerity” driven privatisation strategy will eventually cost a later administration votes, CMD won’t give two craps though will he.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    It’ll depend how much credit you have on your card or how good your insurance is.

    It’ll take more than 5 years for them to destroy it but they’ll try their best.

    Pay as you go NHS.

    P-Jay
    Member

    I’ve been thinking about it a lot recently, I personally don’t think 5 years is long enough to kill it – if it was, it wouldn’t have survived the Thatcher years.

    The Tories may cut its funding (they’ll say they haven’t of course) they’ll manage to divert its funding to private sector in the name of efficiency that manages to cost more and they’ll constantly move the goal posts to make it look worse than it is hoping we’ll all beg them to sell it all off – but it won’t really matter because Doctors and Nurses don’t give a **** about them, genuinely they don’t – it’s a calling, not a job – Nurses especially like to moan about the NHS, the paper work, the stupid hours the unfathable directives, but they genuinely care about people and thier welfare so they’ll carry on doing what they do.

    MrsCat is a lifelong NHS worker and fanatically loyal to it but in the past 3 years she has become more disillusioned, the nextt round of cuts may just tip her over the edge.

    5thElefant
    Member

    Better funded than it would have been.

    dannyh
    Member

    The NHS in five years will be what it is now. A political football with constant government interference trying to make it into something it patently is not and never can be.

    Nurses especially like to moan about the NHS, the paper work, the stupid hours the unfathable directives, but they genuinely care about people and thier welfare so they’ll carry on doing what they do.

    No, they don’t like to moan, they’d prefer not to, and saying they like to moan is fantastically disrespectful to people who do a tremendous job in spite the crap the government keeps throwing at them

    project
    Member

    Cycled round our local hospital today, massive amount of empty space just waiting to be redeveloped into housing etc, then all the seperate departments all seperate entrances and car parks to easily be sold off tho private companies, then we have the huge number of super health centres on the wirral all just ready to be sold off. Lots of bits already sold of hotel services, catering /cleaning and laundry, security/pharmacy/ambulance patient transport/dentists/maintance/personel/ and probably soon to folow, OT/Physio, x-ray/scaning/mri,and lots more.

    It will still be there and people who continually predict it’s down fall because “the Tories are trying to rip it apart” or “labour is distroying the economy and can’t afford it” are either scaremongering or deluded, they also do the people who work hard everyday to provide its services a massive disservice.

    Unfortunately it will never be good enough, not for lack of good staff I’ll add.

    There will never be enough money, it’s a simple fact. If it had twice the money the situation would not change.

    Treatments get better, people will live longer, the longer they live the more treatments they need, treatments get better people live longer.

    Cancel one heart transplant how many hips could you replace or extra nurses could you have. It always has and always will be a juggling act and no matter who is charge or how much money it has, it will never be enough and we will complain its going down the pan. But it will still be there.

    Would I like to see more spent on it, hell yes, but you can only spend what you have and you can only spend it once, pick what you want to take it from. Glad it’s not my choice.

    In 2020 there will be a fledgling NHS and a stand alone private service using what is left of the old NHS.

    fatboyslo
    Member

    In spite of rumours to the contrary it will still be FREE at point of use.
    Probably leaner,
    Possibly more efficient,
    Hopefully less beuracratic
    And regrettably as has been said above still a political football

    I expect education to be on its knees too. Some serious shit will hit the fan when the current surge in primary kids hit secondary andcthere arent enough teachers or rooms.

    poah
    Member

    depends if you are in scotland or south of the border 😉

    5thElefant
    Member

    depends if you are in scotland or south of the border

    Or west. It’ll be on its knees in Wales at the rate its going.

    I expect so but the linked nature of funding may scupper Scottish pkans.

    Premier Icon slackalice
    Subscriber

    We are incredibly fortunate to have such a health service and I echo the comments made by johnikgriff.

    I do also feel it needs to change to meet contemporary demands and expectations from staff to patients to politicians. It’s very essence, to me, as being ‘free at the point of delivery health care’ is also it’s greatest disservice. I would like to know if any research has been done to look at how we value our health, when we can get fixed for essentially no direct cost to us as a patient. We pay through our taxes and we have to pay tax anyway. I wonder how much the health of the nation would be different if people had to part with money from their own account for every visit they make to their GP?

    I understand the French system works with patients claiming their healthcare costs back. Massive amount of bureaucracy so possibly not the best way for us, but I do feel we need to understand how much it costs to run a primary care clinic, let alone secondary care.

    Perhaps a capitation system could work for those able to afford a monthly payment that helps to provide a range of primary healthcare services for a community?

    Either way, not this time around and I dare say it will be much the same in 5years time.

    Probably leaner,
    Possibly more efficient,
    Hopefully less beuracratic

    What does “leaner” mean with respect to the NHS?
    How would you suggest that the NHS becomes more efficient – maybe more efficient at driving its staff out of the country.
    Less beauracratic – go on then enlighten me.

    Premier Icon notmyrealname
    Subscriber

    How would you suggest that the NHS becomes more efficient – maybe more efficient at driving its staff out of the country.

    By being better at spending the money they already receive.
    By cutting out the pointless departments, directors, managers and their hangers-on that soak up huge amounts of money but serve no particular purpose.
    By stopping their suppliers ripping the arse out of them every time the NHS buys something, be it buying in external labour by way of agency staff and contractors or buying in equipment and paying way over the odds for it.

    I’ve worked for the NHS for 10 years or so now and the way that different departments waste money is incredible. If they spent the money they had better then they wouldn’t need more money.

    jonba
    Member

    The NHS in five years will be what it is now. A political football with constant government interference trying to make it into something it patently is not and never can be.

    +1

    Like most things someone will find a defect, highlight it and claim the end of civilisation is coming and blame somebody they don’t like.

    Probably leaner,
    Possibly more efficient,

    Shave a few minutes off examination times,
    treat patients less like people and more like cattle.
    we’re getting there

    Right – this may turn into a rant, and it may well upset a few people.

    The NHS is for people who are ill or injured and cannot deal with it without professional intervention. Patients should not include people who are too pissed to walk home, people who have small cuts, bruises, sprained ankles dead legs, problems conceiving babies, or any other manner of non-life threatening ailments. It also shouldn’t be there for people who just want a moan, or cant be arsed to find out how to do something by themselves. If people would take just a little bit of personal responsibility and stop wanting to be spoon fed everything then the NHS’s limited resources, including its staff would be less stretched and the levels of care would be better.

    An example that I heard about recently in England from an ex colleague: Man in his 50s fell whilst descending out of the attic and got a sore neck. No impact on his head or neck and no whiplash injury. He was blue lighted to the hospital where he had his neck scanned, this scan was then sent to a tertiary neurology centre for a selection of consultant neurologists and neurosurgeons to analyse. He was then advised to wear a hard collar for 8 weeks 24hrs/day and report to hospital twice each week to get the collar inserts changed. This is all fair enough. He was perfectly able to walk to the hospital.

    Changing collar inserts is a 2 person job and when everything is taken into account it takes up over an hour of time that could be spent seeing other patients. But that’s not really an issue for someone with a broken neck, no matter how minimally broken it is.

    Anyway, I’ve been told that this patient missed his first appointment to get the collar inserts changed, and when he was phoned up he said that he didn’t like the collar and had taken it off. My ex-colleague then had to spend the whole day explaning to them the risks of not wearing the collar and convicing them that it was indeed a good idea to keep it on. They patient then said that they couldn’t walk to the hospital or get transport and would infact need people to go to him to change his collar inserts.

    Bear in mind that it’s a two person job, and community physios won’t go to people who are able to walk about by themselves. This means that two trained physios from the orthopaedic wards had to go out to this persons home two times each week and change his collar insert for him. This meant that they had to walk to the patients house because they didn’t want to use the departmental budget for taxis, and spent a couple of hours out of the department twice a week. That totals up to more than a day per week lost to the department just because some asshat couldn’t be arsed to put in a little bit of effort to take a wee bit of responsibility for t eir own health.

    As much as I would like to have suggested that they leave the idiot to their own devices and let him paralyse himself – the NHS trust would no doubt have been sued for millions.

    People think that they are owed so much in this country when they contribute **** all to it.

    wanmankylung – Member
    In 2020 there will be a fledgling NHS and a stand alone private service using what is left of the old NHS.

    Are you a betting man?

    By stopping their suppliers ripping the arse out of them every time the NHS buys something, be it buying in external labour by way of agency staff and contractors or buying in equipment and paying way over the odds for it.

    I’ll give you the suppliers ripping the arse out of things bit – but newsflash – there is going to be much more ripping the arse out of things with the way the Tories have pushed the thing.

    Are you a betting man?

    No. I’m not that stupid.

    Premier Icon Mugboo
    Subscriber

    Dunno but I hope that they improve/fix the the way that 101, GP’s and A&E work or don’t work together.

    Dunno but I hope that they improve/fix the the way that 101, GP’s and A&E work or don’t work together.

    How about they have a poster campaign?

    Maybe have it something like this:
    Thinking of dialling 101 – there’s bugger all wrong with you – go away,
    Feeling really ill and you dont just think you need help but know you need help – phone GP and get an appointment,
    Find someone on the street half dead – get them to A&E.
    Everyone else – toughen up princess.

    brooess
    Member

    Take it out of political control… it’s just a football atm.

    Forgetting ideology and political prejudice, just how do you provide a health service for a population who:
    a) are getting old and living longer
    b) refuse to look after their own health en masse (60+% overweight or obese)
    c) are too skint to be able to afford tax increases…

    We definitely need reform, don’t we? Someone has to bite the bullet and find a cheaper way to do it, somehow?

    We definitely need reform, don’t we?

    [Labour]
    No! Our NHS is perfectly perfect. Evil nasty people want to ruin it. But it’s OUR NHS. Didn’t they hear that? It’s OUR ball and we’re taking it home if we can’t shaft it to hell and back.
    [/Labour]

    a) are getting old and living longer

    The amount of people I have seen who are stuck in hospital when they should be in care homes, simply because the families dont want to lose their inheritence disgusts me. They could take back social care from the private sector, but they wont.

    b) refuse to look after their own health en masse (60+% overweight or obese)

    Botox is around £70/vial. Botox the pie arms – job jobbed.

    Premier Icon Mugboo
    Subscriber

    Or change the litigious way we live? That way the 101 number wouldn’t nearly always result in a visit to the GP or A&E? Or worse, an ambulance being sent out to many people who do not need a lift to A&E.

    Premier Icon doglover
    Subscriber

    What Will The NHS Be In 5 Years? – believe the mainstream and it has ring fenced budgets, but tell me a hospital thats not having to save millions each year, my local Southampton performs amazingly but still suffers with having to make crazy budget cuts, they are destine to fail, targets or not, then it’s easier to suggest outsourcing (that has proven to fail too). I would love it to survive like it is but yes it needs 3 or 4 times more investment from GP roots upwards.

    I suspect it will not be too different from it is now – but will be costing us £7 billion a year more at least. It is in dire need of significant reform and more involvement from private sector service providers, but it won’t get it because it is too much of a political hot potato and no politician/PM of any party will have the balls to do what is needed. Instead it will lumber on pretty much unchanged from what it is today, costing us more and more and sucking more and more money and resources from other public service purses, which are already under severe stress and starting to suffer as a result, until at some point it will completely and utterly collapse and need some form of emergency rescue like we did with the banks. And at that point the pro-privatisaion lobby will surface and the NHS will properly be under threat.

    I’m Pro-NHS and completely and utterly hate the US system – its cruel, heartless and in this day and age utterly barbaric. But they are polar opposites of a wide and broad spectrum, and there is a middle ground that still delivers a publicly owned and free at the point of use service. Many other countries manage it – there are not many other countries, if any at all, that have a health system the same as ours, but yet are able to deliver a better and more cost effective service.

    In order to survive the NHS has to be affordable and sustainable. Its currently not and therefore, I fear, on a one-way course for collapse. It’ll probably take another 20 years, but unless we do something in the meantime its inevitable.

    Edric 64
    Member

    The very sick and unhealthy will still die whether we have an NHS or not .The thick will still be uneducated whatever gets done with education

    wiggles
    Member

    I just hope it still exists….

    but everyone seems more interested in getting tax reductions than actually thinking about what their tax pays for.

    In order to survive the NHS has to be affordable and sustainable

    The other way of looking at this is the demand is neither affordable or sustainable. People are using the NHS when they dont have to.

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