Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 61 total)
  • What to spray into suspension pivots after washing bike?
  • choppersquad
    Free Member

    After washing the bike after a wet muddy ride is there anything to spray a little bit of into the suspension pivots  just to drive out the water and lube them a bit? I usually use a bit of GT85 but have a feeeling that it might be a de-greaser.

    colournoise
    Full Member

    No idea whether it’s any better of an idea, but I use a silicone spray.

    kimbers
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t use gt85

    Tbh im not convinced by washing the bike at all, im sure i read an interview with the Transition owner saying wiping down with a wet cloth after it had dried was the hest thing to do

    (but i know we all love a shiny bike

    .

    thols2
    Full Member

    As above, don’t wash the bike, just let it dry and brush off the dirt. If you do wash the bike, don’t wash the suspension pivots – if water can get, you’re driving grit into the bearings. Spraying lube on won’t drive water out.

    masterdabber
    Free Member

    As above… most times I use one of those car cleaning brushes that you can attach to a hose and brush the bike down (but with the brush stand-alone, not attached to a hose).  If I do any hosing it is with one of those very low pressure garden fence sprayer with a fine spray.

    b33k34
    Full Member

    Spraying lube on won’t drive water out.

    The ‘WD’ in  WD40 stands for Water Dispersant, but it has the disadvantage of also dissolving grease so not the best thing for pivots.

    compressed air would be the best thing to use to dry the bike before putting it away if you had a compressor (I don’t).  I’ve definitely had issues in the past when I’ve cleaned a bike and put it away wet, not ridden it for ages and found something seized.

    thols2
    Full Member

    compressed air would be the best thing to use to dry the bike before putting it away

    It’ll blow water and grit into the bearings.

    grimep
    Free Member

    Nothing, bearings are sealed.

    I hose my bikes down.

    Never had a problem in 25 years of full sus bikes.

    whatgoesup
    Full Member

    My approach is to avoid driving water and dirt into them, so whilst the frame and wheels gets a “good wash” any areas around the pivots are treated much more gently – “get them wet” rather than blast them, and then use a soft brush to get the dirt off (muc-off make a great one – quite large and also soft – shifts most dirt easily once it’s wet).

    The bearings are sealed behind rubber seal with the grease inside, so if you do the above you should be able to avoid getting any muck past the seals. Anything left outside of the seals themselves is just cosmetic dirt so best not be too fussy about cleaning it too perfectly.

    Given the above – spraying WD40 / GT86 will make no difference so long as it’s only outside of the rubbers seals, and if you’re getting the spray inside the seals to the bearings themselves then you’ve got a much bigger problem going on – so I’d say if you want to then go ahead, but it’s the gentle washing approach that will actually make the difference.

    endoverend
    Full Member

    Ditto Nothing. Really important not to do this, nothing you try to put in will be better than what the bearing is packed with. Best to avoid even directing water at your pivots when cleaning, especially not a pressure washer, try just to wipe off that area – cleaning sprays tend to easily get behind seals and start deteriorating the grease, and you wouldn’t want to run a bearing with gt85 or similar as your only lube.

    If you feel the bearings have lost their grease/ feel gritty one can carefully pick the seal, flush out with something like isopropyl alcohol, repack with best grease – stick tape around the end of a pencil jammed in to a powerdrill to spin-up the inner race as can help to relieve the notchiness induced from a normal pivots lack of rotation.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Yep, nothing needed in the pivots.

    I use low pressure hose and bush followed by a spray down. I only use degreaser on drivetrain once in a while, when it gets proper filthy, but wary of getting it on discs, pads, pivots etc.

    mjsmke
    Full Member

    I dont spray anything in there. But then I dont use any chemicals when washing my bike. Only water and never use a pressure washer anywhere near bearings or seals.

    kelvin
    Full Member

    i read an interview with the Transition owner saying wiping down with a wet cloth after it had dried was the hest thing to do

    Where did they live/ride? This sounds ideal for places other than deep shit and mud UK.

    Onzadog
    Free Member

    Where did they live/ride? This sounds ideal for places other than deep shit and mud UK.

    Bellingham I believe. Actually not that different from the UK at times.

    racereadysuspension
    Free Member

    It’s all too easy to get caught up in marketing hype and buy loads of products. But in all honesty, trying to use a specific spray to lube/clean/help suspension pivots is just not worthwhile. The majority of bikes use sealed bearings on pivots. As such its a bit pointless trying to lube them with a spray as the rubber seals will prevent any ingress of your magical lube-in-a-can.
    The same goes for all those cleverly marketed suspension lubes. Yes, they smell nice, and leave a shiny feel on metalwork but they also can cause premature perishing of the nitrile rubber due to the propellants and chemicals. They’re far from a being a ‘service in a can’ as one of them proudly boasts on the can.
    Whenever I see cracked and perished seals on forks and shocks I always ask customers if they use suspension lubes, and its always a resounding yes!

    wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    matt-outandabout what sort of bush? I wash mine against a privet hedge, it’s evergreen and non scratchy!

    wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    @racereadysuspension can I add “bike killer” mucoff to your list?

    racereadysuspension
    Free Member

    @wheelsonfire1
    I can always spot the muc-off users due to the faded anodising on fork and shock adjusters.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    matt-outandabout what sort of bush? I wash mine against a privet hedge, it’s evergreen and non scratchy!

    One that plugs onto my hose and runs water through, plus a cheap-as household dustpan brush with very long soft bristles we had lying around! Between both of them it gets most much shifted. I tend to light spray with water, brush well, then rinse off.

    I do have a couple of ‘proper’ bike drivetrain brushes too.

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    matt-outandabout what sort of bush?

    You’ve passed the edit window

    jamiemcf
    Full Member

    Can I ask what people are doing with muc off to get it to strip the anodising? I use it but it’s rarely on for long and I’m yet to notice any fade…. Am I just not using it for long enough

    racereadysuspension
    Free Member

    @jamiemcf
    It’s really important to rinse it off thoroughly. It’s an alkaline based cleaner, and that will dull anodised parts. In the same way that you can use Mr Muscle oven cleaner (also alkaline based) to strip the colour completely off parts if you want to make them silver.

    mashr
    Full Member

    I can always spot the muc-off users due to the faded anodising on fork and shock adjusters.

    Thays why the thinking Muc-Off user has Marzocchi forks with plastic adjusters 😉

    highpeakrider
    Free Member

    I dry mine with a vac set to blow, drive train and suspension, all the bike, I also dry my triumph this way and get rid of all standing water.

    jamiemcf
    Full Member

    I must be washing it off well and quickly then. 😂

    Good knowledge though

    choppersquad
    Free Member

    Blimey….I use Muc off too so I guess that’s a no no. Will try and wash my bike less now.

    noeffsgiven
    Free Member

    This is about water in the pivots, OP didn’t mention pressure washing or harsh cleaners, a simple sponge down is gonna leave water around the pivots, rain water too. Personally I use a soft paint brush with a plastic ferrule to avoid scratching anything, I also use it around fork seals to get dust off in summer, would never spray GT85 there, maybe a little silicone spray on the bristles of the brush. I’ve used silicone spray on seals for years and never had issues arise from it.

    hooli
    Full Member

    I use a mini compressor to dry mine off after washing, I have noticed since doing it that bearings last a lot longer than they used to. I used to put it in the kitchen overnight at the old house as the warmer, drier air helped but the new house has a smaller kitchen and there isn’t an out of the way corner to put a bike.

    chakaping
    Free Member

    Don’t know if I’m really adding anything to the above comments, but I’d usually spray the bike with a garden hose (low-ish pressure) and use a bucket of warm soapy water and a brush.

    Then I pop the dehumidifer in with it to dry it off.

    alan1977
    Free Member

    wait? talk to me about muc off?

    tbh, i buy whatever the cheapest bike specific concentrate is at the time, lifeline, muc off? talk to me

    chakaping
    Free Member

    wait? talk to me about muc off?

    tbh, i buy whatever the cheapest bike specific concentrate is at the time, lifeline, muc off? talk to me

    Try a bucket of warm water with washing up liquid and a brush, see if you notice any real difference.

    nickc
    Full Member

    .I use Muc off too so I guess that’s a no no

    You have to heavily dose the thing and leave it to soak in with Muc-Off to see any sort of corrosion, and TBH, if you’re the sort of person that thinks that any silicone spray from any manufacturer is a substitute to a regular strip-down and service, then you deserve whatever you get. If on the other hand your spray a bit on the stanchions, cycle the forks to pull what muck is floating about the wiper seals away from them, and wipe of any residue with a clean micro fibre including any excess Muc-Off . Your fork will be fine. 

    kelvin
    Full Member

    Don’t know if I’m really adding anything to the above comments, but I’d usually spray the bike with a garden hose (low-ish pressure) and use a bucket of warm soapy water and a brush.

    Then I pop the dehumidifer in with it to dry it off.

    That’s what I do. Dehumidifier for 2 hours. I avoid muck-off etc… can ruin paint not just anodising.

    Whenever I see cracked and perished seals on forks and shocks I always ask customers if they use suspension lubes, and its always a resounding yes!

    Is that not just because they’re likely to be the kind of rider who goes for far too long between services, rather than as a direct result of the suspension “lube”? (assuming you mean silicone spray with no other inappropriate for rubber shit in it)

    molgrips
    Free Member

    if water can get, you’re driving grit into the bearings.

    If seals so were so poor that low pressure water could force grit past them, they wouldn’t last literally 5 minutes on a muddy trail.

    You could maybe force water past seals with a jet washer directed straight at them, but that would be quite difficult due to the way they are made.

    I think the way that bearings fail is as you bounce around on the bike the balls flex slightly, it roughens up the surfaces which causes more wear and as the balls and races get damaged the seals end up having to flex more to account for the movement, and eventually on one hit a trace of moisture gets in which, if the bike is dirty brings a tiny bit of material in with it. Once this is in the balls and races start to wear which then makes more play and more water gets in then within a ride they are knackered.

    Nooks and crannies on bikes collect crud and grime, and if there’s a bearing there the accumulated crud is ready to work its way in.  So I hose the pivot areas with a garden hose, sometimes a cleaner, to wash the crud out. I think that silicone spray or something similar would help bead water and stop it collecting in wet crud, but it doesn’t seem to last long so I don’t bother.   My bearings last many years (except on that Gary Fisher because they were comically undersized). I even jetwashed my bike regularly for many years and it had no effect on the bearing longevity – because I didn’t stuff the jet right up against the pivots, I held it about 30cm from the areas concerned.  If you’re using a small jetwasher then you can stick your fingers in the stream 30cm from the nozzle and it’s pretty low pressure but high flow which is what you want.  Don’t spend tons of money on some industrial grade weapon of mass destruction, they do more harm than good.

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    Its nice that some people are so caring about their bikes, but why so precious about washing but not so precious about riding or transporting? ie whilst riding mud must get forced towards pivots at high speed and then anyone who uses a bike rack or uplift. How do bikes cope with being used but not being washed ?

    scruff
    Free Member

    Paint brush (1 inch) as mentioned above is the best thing for getting into suspension nooks and crannies. Bit of muc off / fairy and a low pressure hose off.

    endoverend
    Full Member

    I think the way that bearings fail is as you bounce around on the bike the balls flex slightly

    errmmm. No they don’t, not the balls in the bearings anyhow.

    aphex_2k
    Free Member

    WD40 ? Yikes Wouldn’t the solvent damage the seals?

    thols2
    Full Member

    How do bikes cope with being used but not being washed ?

    Mine seem to cope fine. I don’t ride through bogs, put them on a roof rack, or own a jet washer. I mostly don’t clean them, if they get muddy I let them dry and then brush it off.

    mert
    Free Member

    I think the way that bearings fail is as you bounce around on the bike the balls flex slightly, it roughens up the surfaces which causes more wear and as the balls and races get damaged the seals end up having to flex more to account for the movement, and eventually on one hit a trace of moisture gets in which, if the bike is dirty brings a tiny bit of material in with it. Once this is in the balls and races start to wear which then makes more play and more water gets in then within a ride they are knackered.

    Lots of mechanisms at play in bearing failure, the rolling elements flexing is quite a long way down the list…

    Nothing, bearings are sealed.

    “Sealed”.

    If they were actually *sealed* they wouldn’t rotate very freely…

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