Viewing 28 posts - 1 through 28 (of 28 total)
  • what rear light for night riding?
  • Premier Icon sofaboy73
    Free Member

    need a new rear light for the MTB for night rides as there’s a few road sections on a a couple of my regular loops. have managed to ‘misplace’ my old one since last year and can’t for the life of me remember what it was.

    quick look at CRC / Wiggle throws up many many choices, so is there a go to light that people are using or is it much of a muchness for what i want?

    ideally easy secure clamp to seatpost / seat tube that can be angled / pivotted so light isn’t just shining on tyre, rechargeable with decent run time, c £25.

    any notable suggestions

    TIA

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    This is my current favourite rear light, 6 hours on bright flash (which is very bright) and weights only 40g. Fits securely on seat posts.

    £28 here: https://www.cyclestore.co.uk/giant_recon_tl_200_rear_light_2020-ID_78428

    Premier Icon tomnavman
    Full Member

    I’m a big fan of the moon range of rear lights – they have interchangeable mounts, and the lights come with a range of mounts (saddle rails, seat post and bag clip)

    I tend to have a shield as my standard light, mounted on the saddle rails then a smaller backup in my pack just in case.

    Premier Icon Yetiman
    Free Member

    I have the previous version of that Lezyne nobeer posted above which is still going strong and is only on its second battery. Fitted it again last night ready for another winter.

    Premier Icon scuttler
    Full Member

    I have one on the back of my lid. I lost too many off the back of my pack tossing it around and the seat post mounted ones get hammered with wet and mud that reduces life and effectiveness and they don’t play so well with droppers. Plus I have two bikes so I don’t have to swap (minor point).

    Premier Icon simon_g
    Full Member

    If you run an Exposure front light, the Redeye is good – takes power from the front light so one less thing to charge or run out.

    Else I like the round Lezynes, for road riding the mode where it keeps one steady and flashes the other two is really nice.

    Premier Icon sofaboy73
    Free Member

    @Nobeerinthefridge
    @Yetiman

    do those lezyne lights have anyway of angling them? i have a set of there small emergency lights that fix with the band system, problem being that with a relatively slack set tube angle and a fat kancker sagging the suspension, the light end up angled toward the tyre and not where driver can see it most

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Tbh I’ve never needed too, it’s bright enough that the angle down on a FS is still good. Mine is probably the same as Yetimans, can be a front or a rear light.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Full Member

    I use a See.sense on the road, but if I wanted a light for occasional night ride use – I’d just get a Phaart from Planet X – £3/£4 I’ve got a couple of them, just as good as any other if you don’t mind sticking new Energizers in them each winter.

    Premier Icon Yetiman
    Free Member

    @sofaboy73 – same as nobeer. It angles down a bit but it is still very visible.

    I also just remembered the rear light on my daughters hardtail is a Lezyne and it has a slightly angled bracket to offset the seat tube angle. I just googled and it’s the Femto model…

    https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Lezyne-Femto-Drive-LED-Rear-Light_55567.htm

    Premier Icon richmtb
    Full Member

    The correct answer is 2 lights.

    I use one of those Lezyne lights on my seatpost (the band will fit round the collar of a dropper) and a second cheapo Smart clipped to my jacket or camelbak

    Premier Icon whatyadoinsucka
    Free Member

    an exposure traceR for £30 (tredz £5 of £30) cannot be beaten if in direct aim of the rear tyre mud and water, i’ve got 2 use them all year round and day and night, mounts are £7-9, so depending on usage well worth it.

    i also have the redeye microlight plugged into the back of my joystick/axis headtorch for mtbing.

    as others have said the moon lights are great too
    on my gravel drops i have a moon aerolite £20, includes a flashing rear light, the Moon Ring is great to clip on a backpack out the way of mud and wet, as my first one warranty replaced as it breaks..

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    OP I have the same problem with my Lezyne strip-drive rear-light. Fine on my retro rides but anything modern with slack angles (my 29er for instance) means it’s not operating as intended and is less visible especially as an early-warning at distance. It can still be seen by other road-users in the pitch black even when pointing at the tyre – but in urban or lightly-lit semi-rural settings it doesn’t have that piercing distance.

    Pisses me off, but I could probably engineer some rubber wedge and glue it in place to correct the beam-angle. Or sell on and buy something more suitable 🙂

    Bookmarked with interest.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Pisses me off, but I could probably engineer some rubber wedge and glue it in place to correct the beam-angle. Or sell on and buy something more suitable

    Just use a blob of sugro to make a wedge….

    https://sugru.com/

    Premier Icon benp1
    Full Member

    Rather than recommend a light, because I find they’re all pretty good at that price, I’m recommending where to position it

    I put it on the seat stay. It’s out the way of any mud or water (if you don’t run mudguards), it’s still OK if you go bikepacking, and it’s not high enough to blind anyone you’re riding with

    I use one there and one on my lid (red eye micro)

    Premier Icon jeffl
    Full Member

    I’ve got this Aldi one which just sits below the collar of the dropper post. Can be angled so that it points back rather than at the rear tyre. Perfect for road sections linking up off-road.

    https://www.aldi.co.uk/front-%26-rear-bike-light-set/p/017096282743300

    On the commuter I use a standard flashy job from Aldi and an Exposure Trace-R. Used to have a moon shield which was also really good and lasted me a couple of years of commuting until the strap broke and it disappeared one day. Another good reason to run two rear lights.

    Premier Icon WildHunter2009
    Full Member

    Just picked up a Moon nebula and so far impressed. On full its ludicrously bright and nice long strip. I tend to run that on my seatpost and another clipped onto back of helmet or rucksack.

    Premier Icon dangeourbrain
    Full Member

    but anything modern with slack angles

    Don’t those modern bikes have steeper seat angles than the old ones?

    Any who. I’ve a moon nebula at the moment which seems very good, I’m assuming the mount is pants though as I rescued it from trail side.

    Variously I’ve had ebay cheapo, knog, px, exposure etc. Even the more adjustable ones on a post/tube mount only moved so far before the tube prevents them pivoting further so where possible I mount to saddle rails. (eg the current moon one)

    Performance wise the two moon ones I’ve used have been good, the old alu exposure one was great and the knog were very got until the strap broke.

    Premier Icon burko73
    Full Member

    I’ve got an exposure tracer it’s bombproof and blinding with a simple robust mount and just seems to work without much fuss. The back up from exposure is usually worth a few quid extra although I’ve had no problems with mine.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Just ordered one of those exposure redeye micros, mate had one on his joystick last night, very impressive.

    Premier Icon madhouse
    Full Member

    I use a knog blinder. Have an early one (4 LED’s, usb thing flips out) on the MTB that’s been through all manner of conditions and it’s still going strong. Later one (fixed usb thingie) on the road bike which has been equally reliable and is charging as I type.

    In fact the only issue is the battery lasts so long I forget to charge them.

    Premier Icon greatbeardedone
    Free Member

    Don’t think it’s available in the UK just yet.

    But as the other posters said, use as many lights as you can.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    Don’t those modern bikes have steeper seat angles than the old ones?

    Good contentious point. The most modern I get is half a decade ago 😎🍺

    But…just punched a few random 2020 fulls sussers (Vitus Mythique and Boardman MTR) into image search and slapped a virtual version of my strap-mounted light on them and seems to exhibit similar problem

    Premier Icon pampmyride
    Full Member

    ">

    The solution – bar end light using Lezyne light mentioned earlier. Folding mount. Used this for years…

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    I’d say that’s a pretty perfect looking angle for a rear light tbh!

    Premier Icon dangeourbrain
    Full Member

    into image search and slapped a virtual version of my strap-mounted light on them and seems to exhibit similar problem

    I can see your issue, Needz moar layzerz obvz.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    I’d say that’s a pretty perfect looking angle for a rear light tbh!

    Yes for trails/groups, no for roads/vehicle traffic (except maybe when cresting a hill). At least with my old strip drive. Have done the walking back up the road test and when angled 180deg to the surface there is a massive boost in visibility /brightness from a distance.

    Also don’t fancy a rear light on handlebars. F & R lights are best kept at distant points apart so to give approaching road-users some idea of what’s going on/to estimate speed/distance/proximity/direction. A static light at the rear is best. Additional lights that flash (or, preferably, pulse) can be added.

    Some interesting reading here

    https://www.bikelightdatabase.com/faq/

    , Needz moar layzerz obvz.

    Moar layzerz alwayz! #sharkzneedzfeedz

Viewing 28 posts - 1 through 28 (of 28 total)

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