Viewing 31 posts - 81 through 111 (of 111 total)
  • What present day car will be a solid and reliable car in 10-15 years time?
  • Premier Icon hora
    Free Member

    Evening. Are you blaming a car for a battery?

    My old Subaru lost its battery. The battery was 6yrs old and though Batteries are consumable and add ons. Anyway So I hoped in a taxi to Halfords and back.

    That’s the only time that JAPANESE and PETROL car failed on me. Well, the battery.

    BTW I’ve never had ‘AA’ or other breakdown coverand that’s on French or Japanese cars. If I owned a German car I probably would (being honest) but then I wouldn’t buy German..

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    a 15plate civic.

    batterys probably fine- gremlins draining his battery id reckon .

    Premier Icon wagenwheel
    Free Member

    a 15plate civic.

    batterys probably fine- gremlins draining his battery id reckon

    Nah, battery was goosed

    Premier Icon ski
    Free Member

    Stuff reliable cars that will outlive you, what you need is a big gas guzzler of a two seater sports car, something antisocial, that farts large clouds of black smoke every time you start, crawls along the road creating a walking pace traffic jam that can be seen from the moon while you drive 400 yards to the nearest theme pub to dribble over the bar with a shandy in one hand and a viagra in the other.

    It will need to rot at the same rate you do, so as you breath your last breath, the four wheels parked at your retirement home will collapse into a pile of red rust dust, so leaving your offspring nothing but a huge bill to shovel the remains into a skip!

    Premier Icon wilburt
    Free Member

    Theres no reason any modern simple well designed car shouldnt provide 20+ yrs good service if boredom doesnt see it off.

    The comparison with older cars reminds of that recent dealer service thread, when I was doing my apprenticeship a service was a days work with points, plugs, dist cap and leads, filters fluids and tappets adjust the brakes test drives brin it back fettle a bit more etc and even if you did look after them well the cars werent galvinised so soon dissolved back into the earth.

    A modern car needs little more than a change the oil every year and the occasioanl new part itll keep you mobile indefinitely.

    Premier Icon hora
    Free Member

    Don’t most main dealers now avoid retailing anything over 5-7yrs+. Not exactly encouraging is it.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Incorrect.

    There’s no reason why they can’t be though.
    As is the modern way things don’t last because they are designed not to. There’s no money to be made if things last forever.
    Planned obsolescence.

    Err, no. If a Cortina made it to 100k without major surgery, you’d break out the champagne. My cheap Ford is well past that with no rust and routine servicing. It’s a total fallacy to suggest cars don’t last as long – they last far longer.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    It’s a total fallacy to suggest cars don’t last as long – they last far longer.

    They do.

    Just the number of parts they need (we did not need ABS units, AC compressors, DMF, DPF, engine management computers etc 15 years ago) and the cost of those parts has/is rather higher than we would like with the rise of ‘oh, you cant just replace a wheel bearing sonny, you need the whole hub…’ approach to modern cars.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Just the number of parts they need (we did not need ABS units, AC compressors, DMF, DPF, engine management computers etc 15 years ago) and the cost of those parts has/is rather higher than we would like with the rise of ‘oh, you cant just replace a wheel bearing sonny, you need the whole hub…’ approach to modern cars.

    Whilst it’s true that an AC compressor is an expensive item should it break, my car doesn’t need an oil change every 5,000 miles, valve clearances resetting, fuel mixture setting, points, etc, etc.

    Premier Icon TheLittlestHobo
    Free Member

    Pretty much any car will last 10yrs plus if its looked after properly.

    I bought a car I want to keep forever and that’s a blooming Fiat 500 which is pretty much the softest engineered car you can buy.

    But I figured as long as I kept the basic spec its the ‘extras’ that cause trouble rather than the basics.

    1.2 petrol engine which is pence to fix or replace
    No Air Con
    No Auto gearbox
    No sunroof
    No gadgets other than the electric windows & mirrors.
    Waxoiled from new and has been claybarred 3 times in 3 years.

    Its gonna do 5,000mls per annum. Its going to be handed to my kids at about 7yrs old to be the car they learn to drive in. If and when I get it back I will put it in the garage and have it as my toy car.

    I have access to some very nice cars with my day job but I always get a huge smile on my face when I take the wifes car out for a drive.

    Premier Icon philjunior
    Free Member

    I find it interesting that emissions regulations get the blame for the increasing complexity of cars, which these days “have” to have:
    – Climate control
    – Power steering
    – Satnav
    – Heated & electronically controlled seats.
    – Electric windows/mirrors

    etc.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    Don’t most main dealers now avoid retailing anything over 5-7yrs+. Not exactly encouraging is it.

    Or there just isn’t a margin in older cars.

    Look in glasses/parkers and the difference in PX to dealer price is 20% of the value. That’s on a £100 on a £500 banger or £2k on a £10k nearly new Focus. Seeing as (cashflow aside, lets assume they’re managed well and can deal with that) they’re limited by space, so if cars take a weekend or two to sell, that space on the forecourt can either net you £100 or £2k, which car would you put on it? That’s why they send PX’s to the auctions, they could lose the whole £500 and still be better off selling another car with a £2k margin than tying up that space.

    That and there’s always an abundance of 3 year old lease cars to sell which fits in with most peoples mentality of buy a 3yr old car once the depreciation has waned, so they’re quick and easy to shift.

    Premier Icon spectabilis
    Free Member

    Whilst it’s true that an AC compressor is an expensive item should it break, my car doesn’t need an oil change every 5,000 miles, valve clearances resetting, fuel mixture setting, points, etc, etc.

    Yes but that is all simple driveway servicing your everyday owner could do It’s not non serviceable items failing requiring expensive expensive replacements.
    The modern car has killed the home mechanic.

    Premier Icon breatheeasy
    Free Member

    Don’t get so hung up about a car lasting 10 years. You could drive it out of the showroom and written off within minutes (mate got pranged when he was waiting to turn into a petrol station to fill up for the first time…).

    Premier Icon ghostlymachine
    Free Member

    philjunior wrote:

    I find it interesting that emissions regulations get the blame for the increasing complexity of cars, which these days “have” to have:
    – Climate control
    – Power steering
    – Satnav
    – Heated & electronically controlled seats.
    – Electric windows/mirrors

    Failed emissions equipment can stop the car, or destroy the engine, or make it an economic write off, broken sat nav can’t……

    Premier Icon ghostlymachine
    Free Member

    mintyjim wrote:

    Bloody Touran has died again, fault code is stating P0321 which is the crank speed sensor implausible speed – which I replaced 300 miles ago. Gutted as it’s actually a really good car.

    I’d be checking the connector for corrosion, tracking the harness round the engine bay looking for chafe damage (it’s not hugely uncommon to find bits of harness resting against edges of body structure/powertrain after a few years use) so you might get a short of some description, then have a poke around inside the bell housing of the gearbox, see if the sensor ring is damaged, dirty, corroded. I’ve seen what happens when (for instance) the starter motor doesn’t sit quite straight, it eats the ring gear and sprays metal filings all over the inside of the bell housing and clogs everything up, including the sensor ring (and sensor). A stone can damage it (depending what sort of ring it is, and if the housing is open anywhere) so the sensor can’t see it anymore (gap is too big) or a feature is damaged so the sensor gets an illogical number of pulses. Could also be that the sensor is slightly out of position, that’ll give you some odd signals as well.

    Premier Icon Mintyjim
    Full Member

    Thanks Ghostlymachine, interesting comments. I plan to check the loom and I’ll also be changing the starter motor which could be forcing issues as it struggles to start from cold – battery is fine.
    It’s a DSG if that makes any difference??

    I’ve also put the Honda on hold for now and have decided to throw a little more time and money at the Touran so my car of future could change.

    Love the idea of the Landy, I grew up with them and living on the coast in West Wales they’re 2 a penny plus everyone, including me, can fix them!

    Premier Icon deejayen
    Full Member

    I’ve got a Defender, and recently I’ve been taking a curious interest in other cars. The Jazz Si was one I liked the look of. However, I visited a Honda showroom and had a look at the new Jazz (mid-level model) and a Civic Tourer, and like someone else mentioned, I wasn’t too keen on the trim. I know Hondas are reputedly very reliable, but they seemed quite flimsy, and I’m not sure how the non-mechanical parts would stand up to high mileages over many years.

    As for the Defender, the main problem is probably ‘the rot’. Not only the chassis, but the aluminium/steel interfaces. Mine is actually not too bad – it usually gets an annual under-body treatment, but some parts of the bodywork are blistering. It had two new doors just inside the 6 year warranty. It’s had a few breakdowns and problems, but most of these tend to be cyclical – ie the same things go every few ten thousand miles. Overall, it’s not bad for its age and mileage, and I’m fortunate in having a good specialist close by who’s seen all the problems before. Also, parts are readily available and generally not too expensive.

    On the other hand, I’ve heard a good few horror stories about some Discovery and Range Rover models – I’m not sure many of these will be around in 15 years, as they can eat up a lot of money.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    You’re right – modern cars are so much better.

    [quote]
    Incorrect.

    There’s no reason why they can’t be though.
    As is the modern way things don’t last because they are designed not to. There’s no money to be made if things last forever.[/quote]

    Whats your basis for cars not being designed to last. The first few cars and vans I bought in the late 80s / early 90s had 5-digit odometers. By 1980s/90s standards my last van had been round the clock three and half times before I sold it and apart from consumables and service items had an all original drive train and it was all still going strong. I typically don’t buy vehicles until they’ve been two times round the clock and I’m confident they’ll each last me 5 – 8 years and at least another 100k.

    My typical experience in the late 80s / early 90s was clutches lasting 30k, gearbox failures between 60k and 80k, fuel tanks rotting through at 80-90k, then structural rot and an MOT failure sheet 2 pages long by the time it was approaching 10 years old whatever the milage.

    The issue isn’t the quality of manufacture its the complexity of manufacture to achieve the efficiency and performance we want these days. My current bog standard, 10 year old astra van is quieter, more powerful, has double the mechanical longevity and unmeasureably better integrity and build quality, is safer, requires less frequent servicing, is more reliable and uses between a third and a half less fuel of the one I used to drive 20 years ago. Its also older (at the point of purchase and use) and was cheaper to buy than the one I had 20 years ago too.

    The issue of complexity isn’t that the car is designed to fail its that there are too many mechanics who aren’t competent at maintaining and repairing them, believe that modern components can’t be repaired and can only be replaced and most importantly have no idea how to diagnose them.

    Premier Icon hora
    Free Member

    Theres no margin in cars 5-7yrs+? Poppicot! Ever see the difference in what your offered at trade in and the dealers asking price for the car that you are buying? Does your px go to a Nun run orphanage as a gift? Does wbac run with excellent offered prices?.. 🙂

    I’m saying main dealers seem to be avoiding retailing such cars. Why?

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Yes but that is all simple driveway servicing your everyday owner could do It’s not non serviceable items failing requiring expensive expensive replacements.
    The modern car has killed the home mechanic.

    I once rebuilt an engine on a 1980s Citroen. The big end bearing shells were shot, the journals were showing ovality, the piston rings were worn and the tappets were knackered.

    This was on a car that had done 75k. Now, you could argue that it was repairable by a home mechanic, but I’d rather have a car that didn’t require Sundays spent fixing the damned thing, and the occasional large garage bill is a small price to pay for cars that just work.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    All this is an excellent case for buying a 1950s Raleigh Superbe roadster.

    You can guarantee it will still be running in 50 years. 🙂

    Premier Icon ghostlymachine
    Free Member

    Mike wrote:

    I’m saying main dealers seem to be avoiding retailing such cars. Why?

    There’s no margin on them. The difference between trade in and sale values has to cover wages, tidying it up, possibly a service, space to store it, advertising it and the discount they give you off the new car.
    Plus they get no volume discount from their importer.

    Premier Icon andy8442
    Free Member

    So, has anyone proposed a 2015 model car yet?

    Premier Icon butcher
    Full Member

    I’m saying main dealers seem to be avoiding retailing such cars. Why?

    I thought this was due to the number of people willing to seek legal action for faulty goods these days. I don’t think that is anything to do with declining reliability of cars though. More due to the increasing amount people suing people in general. Not really worth it for a couple of hundred quid.

    Premier Icon ryan91
    Free Member

    My old Corsa 1.8 with 109,000 miles on the clock was going very strong, unfortunately met it’s fate in the hands of a chav and quickly joined the scrapheap.
    Therein lies the issue, the value of cars in this country is way too low for people to give a hoot about once they reach their old age. I seem to recall a lot of rusty/broken old cars of little value on drives as a child, with owners spending their free time doing them up. Hardly ever see such vehicles now.
    My corsa actually made sense for a long-term bet. Simple mechanicals, cheap spares, rugged and an understressed engine with spares at any scrapyard nearby.

    Premier Icon outofbreath
    Free Member

    2015 Dacia Sandero. No toys, superb access to engine, very little emmisions electronic trickery. Thousands of them in France less common in UK ‘cos they’ve only recently started doing RHD versions.

    The only problem will be finding one at 10 years old cos I reckon the uncool badge will mean many good ones getting scrapped before their time.

    I think I’m first to suggest a 2015 model. What do I win?

    Premier Icon milky1980
    Free Member

    Go for the uncool car with no major bells and whistles then choose the simplest engine. That’s what I did. A 63 plate Fabia, the only luxury is A/C. The 1.2 12v engine that’s got no DMF, DPF (petrol) manual gearbox and no known major issues. Heading towards 30k now and it’s just starting to loosen up!

    Bought it to replace a 9 year old Fiesta 1.25 that had done 133k. Engine was still sound and the bodywork was rust-free but all the trim was falling off it, creaks galore and always needed a new pair of headlights (the bulb auto-adjust motors would fail, known issue) and at least one new front spring (snapped them for fun, another known issue) at each MOT. Was just incredibly annoying to drive and own so got shot of it.

    I hope to get 10 years + out of the Fabia 🙂

    Premier Icon ghostlymachine
    Free Member

    A modern car needs little more than a change the oil every year and the occasioanl new part itll keep you mobile indefinitely.

    LOL.

    Premier Icon ratadog
    Full Member

    Hopefully, the one I bought on Friday in exchange for a sum of money and its unreliable predecessor.

    Premier Icon MrNutt
    Free Member

    I drive a 96 Volvo 850SE 2.5ltr, had an intermittent fault, which often see’s these head to the scrapyard as garages tend to claim its the ECU or similar and could cost a fortune to diagnose let alone fix.

    After about 3 days of head scratching I managed to suss out that it was the Engine Temp Sensor and it cost me a whopping £20 for the sensor and a few quid to a mate to swap them over (I would have done it but the restaurant has me too busy).

    Now thats fixed I anticipate only about another £100 spend on the horizon (replacement shock) and then it should be good for at least another 12 mths. (oh a small rusty patch on the drivers side wing)

    All the spares are available for these things and thankfully they’re from just before everything became overly computerised.

    It’s also very comfortable, safe and quick. Whats more once we capture those ISIS oil wells the cost of unleaded is bound to plummet!!

    And its a saloon so it can’t ever be considered “desirable”

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